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New HD in Dell Dimension 4300?



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 2nd 03, 02:47 PM
Leif K-Brooks
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Default New HD in Dell Dimension 4300?

I own a Dell Dimension 4300. I want to install a new 120GB hard drive
in it, with 40GB extra for Windows and 80GB for a new SuSE Linux
installation. I have a few questions:

1) Which hard drive would everyone reccomend? I don't need something
incredibly fast, but not really slow either. I'm hoping to spend less
than $200 on the hard drive.
2) According to the Dell website
(http://support.ap.dell.com/docs/syst...ce.htm#1124764
step 8), I should install the new hard drive in the upper bay and move
the existing one into the lower bay. Why can't I install the new one in
the lower bay?
3) I'm planning to buy an anti-static mat and wrist strap. Should I
just touch the metal on the computer like Dell says?
4) Once I install the hard drive, how would I correctly partition it for
my purposes? I'm guessing I would make a 40GB partition for Windows and
let the SuSE installer make the other. How would I do that, or is it
the correct way?


  #2  
Old July 3rd 03, 02:48 AM
MiniDisc_2k2
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Default


"Leif K-Brooks" wrote in
message ...
I own a Dell Dimension 4300. I want to install a new 120GB hard drive
in it, with 40GB extra for Windows and 80GB for a new SuSE Linux
installation. I have a few questions:

1) Which hard drive would everyone reccomend? I don't need something
incredibly fast, but not really slow either. I'm hoping to spend less
than $200 on the hard drive.


You could get a bunch of options for the 120GB hard drive for under $200.
Because your system does not support SATA (Serial ATA, a faster type of hard
drive), you won't need to worry about spending over $200. I would recommend
the Western Digital Caviar line, which uses a high RPM speed and large
cache, resulting in increased performance. Maxtor also has the same
7200RPM/8MB cache hard drives for about the same price (buy whichever's on
sale). Try to get an ATA/133 drive. These are backwards compatible with
whatever hard drive you're using right now, and will run at the fastest
speed available if possible (or if you upgrade your computer further).

2) According to the Dell website
(http://support.ap.dell.com/docs/syst...ce.htm#1124764
step 8), I should install the new hard drive in the upper bay and move
the existing one into the lower bay. Why can't I install the new one in
the lower bay?


1. Don't listen to Dell, they're a bunch of people who can't speak english
and don't know computers enough to save their life.
2. The only reason that they're saying this is because they probably assume
that you'd want the new hard drive to be the master (main) hard drive.
Because both hard drives fit on the same ribbon cable, the only way you
would be able to fit the cable on both hard drives was if the master was in
the upper bay (or if the two hard drives were upside down).
3. From what I understand, you'll just be throwing out the old hard drive so
this doesn't matter anyways. But I'd recommend keeping that old hard drive
in your case for increased storage.
4. Use the hard drive manufacturer's instructions and software. It'll be
much easier to understand and more relevant.


3) I'm planning to buy an anti-static mat and wrist strap. Should I
just touch the metal on the computer like Dell says?


Yeah, don't worry about the antistatic stuff. The only time you really need
that is when you'll be working on the computer for an extended period of
time, like when replacing the motherboard. In fact, I have even touched my
motherboard while the computer was plugged in (oops) and the hard power was
on (double oops) a few times but nothing happened. Therefore, I am biased to
say that the antistatic strap is really unnecessary. Just make sure to touch
the case before touching anything. That, and make sure that the power's off.
I refuse to take responsibility if you go home and try leaving it plugged
in. :-)

4) Once I install the hard drive, how would I correctly partition it for
my purposes? I'm guessing I would make a 40GB partition for Windows and
let the SuSE installer make the other. How would I do that, or is it
the correct way?


Your hard drive should come with software to partition the hard drive. I
would recommend using that software rather than mucking about with the
installer. Mixing linux and windows installers could mean mixing dos
partitions and whatever linux uses (sorry I don't use it). This could cause
a real strain on the two OSes. Usually it's easier (nicer user interface) to
use the software which came with the hard drive as well. Maxtor has a
particularily easy-to-manage user interface which I had the pleasure of
using. Unfortunately their "quick format" which they brag about actually
doesn't work. Just reformat the hard drive after setting up the partitions
(and after it claims that the partition(s) has/have been formatted)

Good luck
-- MiniDisc_2k2
To reply, replace nospam.com with cox dot net.


  #3  
Old July 3rd 03, 05:23 AM
Leif K-Brooks
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

MiniDisc_2k2 wrote:
You could get a bunch of options for the 120GB hard drive for under $200.
Because your system does not support SATA (Serial ATA, a faster type of hard
drive), you won't need to worry about spending over $200. I would recommend
the Western Digital Caviar line, which uses a high RPM speed and large
cache, resulting in increased performance. Maxtor also has the same
7200RPM/8MB cache hard drives for about the same price (buy whichever's on
sale). Try to get an ATA/133 drive. These are backwards compatible with
whatever hard drive you're using right now, and will run at the fastest
speed available if possible (or if you upgrade your computer further).


Hmm... thanks. They look about right.

The only reason that they're saying this is because they probably assume
that you'd want the new hard drive to be the master (main) hard drive.
Because both hard drives fit on the same ribbon cable, the only way you
would be able to fit the cable on both hard drives was if the master was in
the upper bay (or if the two hard drives were upside down).


Actually, it looks like the slave has to go in the middle of the cable,
which puts it on the top.

From what I understand, you'll just be throwing out the old hard drive so
this doesn't matter anyways. But I'd recommend keeping that old hard drive
in your case for increased storage.


No, I'm keeping it for my Windows installation. The second HD will just
be used for Linux and extra space for Windows.

Yeah, don't worry about the antistatic stuff. The only time you really need
that is when you'll be working on the computer for an extended period of
time, like when replacing the motherboard. In fact, I have even touched my
motherboard while the computer was plugged in (oops) and the hard power was
on (double oops) a few times but nothing happened. Therefore, I am biased to
say that the antistatic strap is really unnecessary. Just make sure to touch
the case before touching anything. That, and make sure that the power's off.
I refuse to take responsibility if you go home and try leaving it plugged
in. :-)


I'll probably get one anyway, simply because I'm a coward. :-)

Your hard drive should come with software to partition the hard drive. I
would recommend using that software rather than mucking about with the
installer.


I don't see why the SuSE installer wouldn't be able to figure out what
to do with 80GB of unpartitioned space if I tell it to. It does have an
option to use free space...

Mixing linux and windows installers could mean mixing dos
partitions and whatever linux uses (sorry I don't use it). This could cause
a real strain on the two OSes.


How is that a strain on the OSes?


 




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