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Unreally Lucky HDD



 
 
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  #11  
Old June 15th 18, 05:15 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Yes[_2_]
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Posts: 86
Default Unreally Lucky HDD

Flasherly wrote:

-- snipped --

Time to buy another 2T HDD - just not Seagate. I'll probably get
Western Digital. I'm not sure which I trust more between a Seagate
and Samsung, although for a fair share and sense of luck it's "OK" to
say Western Digital will be the first choice. Rather I'll go lazy and
join the pack, where Western Digital rules Amazon's marketing user
review feedback stats;- expensive or not HDDs subject to IT review
sites for longevity standings is also considerate if not smart[er],
just not as lazy.

My 2T drives that are crammed, also, with maybe 50GB remaining free;-
I expect to be adding another 1T drive before long to supplement this
2T.


wrt Seagate, I have just finished installing a Seagate BarraCuda
ST3000DM007 3TB internal hard drive. It took three tries. The first
two drives were DOA. The third time the drive seems to be working;
only time will tell. As I understand it, this drive (3TB size) is
fairly new.

I'm not happy that it took three times to get one that works. I bought
the first drive through newegg but contacted Seagate directly with
regard to the replacement/warranty process. I placed the order with
newegg in late April and finished getting and installing the working
drive around June 2. The reviews at newegg suggested that about 25% of
the users panned Seagate for DOA drives, so I did have some warning
that DOA drives were a problem. Looking at reviews for Western Digital
drives, I got the impression that WD had a similar problem, just not as
big - may 20% of the reviews citing a DOA drive.

The only good thing was that I was very satisfied with the the service
at Seagate Support. Their reps answered my questions about the return
procedure and what I should expect to happen. The shipping worked as
expected. The reps had their notes on hand to see what we had talked
about from the previous conversations.

The other thing is that I chose to deal directly with Seagate to handle
the warranty replacements. Seagate will replace the defective drive
but not substitute. I could have done the RMA through newegg but
figured it'd be faster all around to use Seagate. After the 2nd DOA
drive, I felt like I made a mistake; I began thinking that I should
have gone through newegg to have the option of refund, replacement or
substitution. My initial thinking was that it would take less time to
resolve the problem and that surely I wouldn't be hit with multiple DOA
drives. Sigh.

John
  #12  
Old June 15th 18, 10:38 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
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Posts: 2,047
Default Unreally Lucky HDD

On Fri, 15 Jun 2018 16:15:49 -0000 (UTC), "Yes"
wrote:

wrt Seagate, I have just finished installing a Seagate BarraCuda
ST3000DM007 3TB internal hard drive. It took three tries. The first
two drives were DOA. The third time the drive seems to be working;
only time will tell. As I understand it, this drive (3TB size) is
fairly new.

I'm not happy that it took three times to get one that works. I bought
the first drive through newegg but contacted Seagate directly with
regard to the replacement/warranty process. I placed the order with
newegg in late April and finished getting and installing the working
drive around June 2. The reviews at newegg suggested that about 25% of
the users panned Seagate for DOA drives, so I did have some warning
that DOA drives were a problem. Looking at reviews for Western Digital
drives, I got the impression that WD had a similar problem, just not as
big - may 20% of the reviews citing a DOA drive.

The only good thing was that I was very satisfied with the the service
at Seagate Support. Their reps answered my questions about the return
procedure and what I should expect to happen. The shipping worked as
expected. The reps had their notes on hand to see what we had talked
about from the previous conversations.

The other thing is that I chose to deal directly with Seagate to handle
the warranty replacements. Seagate will replace the defective drive
but not substitute. I could have done the RMA through newegg but
figured it'd be faster all around to use Seagate. After the 2nd DOA
drive, I felt like I made a mistake; I began thinking that I should
have gone through newegg to have the option of refund, replacement or
substitution. My initial thinking was that it would take less time to
resolve the problem and that surely I wouldn't be hit with multiple DOA
drives. Sigh.

John


Tiered for their pricing, they're using increments of a one terabyte
at 25% less for the most common drive sizes on the EZRZ series I
bought, i.e. $44 for 1T, $60 @ 2T, and $75 @ 3T. At 4T linear pricing
allowances change to closer to a 40% increase, initially at least,
perhaps due to a change from build constraints, such as newer
"shingled" track read/write technology.

Is this your first time up with a 3T installation? Were you given a
RMA for no shipping costs, if not at your expense, to return the
drive, having to print your own shipping label, a shipping agency
recognizes as paid for and legal, or did Seagate sent you box no
different then to place a HDD to be returned, for you to deliver the
box to a shipping agency physically located near you?

Paying shipping on a new drive is another 25% cost increase, but
straight-down depreciation. Which I'd already factored on mine from
prestated assurances, I would not be charged, by an intermediary
jobber policy interests to be honored for 30-days after haven taken
delivery of a contract.

At times I don't get far behind an anonymous browser, not that I need
to if failure rates are sensitive and difficult for manufacturers to
represent themselves. IT lobby interests may also bear some relevance
for what drive failure abstracts they may provide.

And then their are the models, an IT's specialty in part his bread and
butter, in knowing to equip customers with relative serial numbers
known characteristically secure for longevity and lack of problematic
issues.

I can as well see the numbers you're citing, although the question
remains, how much incontrovertible faith are you willing to place in
what you are told by others, and what you are told by slick-gloss
experts published in trade material, or as much the manufacturer and
how they are to account a benefit derived from your buying their
product.

Perhaps it is time now that a 3T HDD ought to be as plain, at least as
plain is to me, as it is determine with very little doubt a
distinctiveness apparent between an operational 2T HDD and one that
exhibits deficiency.

I should think. To have even one 3T, or larger, HDD among stacks of
HDDs I do keep. Which I don't.
  #13  
Old June 15th 18, 11:54 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Yes[_2_]
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Posts: 86
Default Unreally Lucky HDD

Flasherly wrote:

On Fri, 15 Jun 2018 16:15:49 -0000 (UTC), "Yes"
wrote:

wrt Seagate, I have just finished installing a Seagate BarraCuda
ST3000DM007 3TB internal hard drive. It took three tries. The
first two drives were DOA. The third time the drive seems to be
working; only time will tell. As I understand it, this drive (3TB
size) is fairly new.

I'm not happy that it took three times to get one that works. I
bought the first drive through newegg but contacted Seagate
directly with regard to the replacement/warranty process. I placed
the order with newegg in late April and finished getting and
installing the working drive around June 2. The reviews at newegg
suggested that about 25% of the users panned Seagate for DOA
drives, so I did have some warning that DOA drives were a problem.
Looking at reviews for Western Digital drives, I got the impression
that WD had a similar problem, just not as big - may 20% of the
reviews citing a DOA drive.

The only good thing was that I was very satisfied with the the
service at Seagate Support. Their reps answered my questions about
the return procedure and what I should expect to happen. The
shipping worked as expected. The reps had their notes on hand to
see what we had talked about from the previous conversations.

The other thing is that I chose to deal directly with Seagate to
handle the warranty replacements. Seagate will replace the
defective drive but not substitute. I could have done the RMA
through newegg but figured it'd be faster all around to use
Seagate. After the 2nd DOA drive, I felt like I made a mistake; I
began thinking that I should have gone through newegg to have the
option of refund, replacement or substitution. My initial thinking
was that it would take less time to resolve the problem and that
surely I wouldn't be hit with multiple DOA drives. Sigh.

John


Tiered for their pricing, they're using increments of a one terabyte
at 25% less for the most common drive sizes on the EZRZ series I
bought, i.e. $44 for 1T, $60 @ 2T, and $75 @ 3T. At 4T linear pricing
allowances change to closer to a 40% increase, initially at least,
perhaps due to a change from build constraints, such as newer
"shingled" track read/write technology.

Is this your first time up with a 3T installation? Were you given a
RMA for no shipping costs, if not at your expense, to return the
drive, having to print your own shipping label, a shipping agency
recognizes as paid for and legal, or did Seagate sent you box no
different then to place a HDD to be returned, for you to deliver the
box to a shipping agency physically located near you?

Paying shipping on a new drive is another 25% cost increase, but
straight-down depreciation. Which I'd already factored on mine from
prestated assurances, I would not be charged, by an intermediary
jobber policy interests to be honored for 30-days after haven taken
delivery of a contract.

At times I don't get far behind an anonymous browser, not that I need
to if failure rates are sensitive and difficult for manufacturers to
represent themselves. IT lobby interests may also bear some relevance
for what drive failure abstracts they may provide.

And then their are the models, an IT's specialty in part his bread and
butter, in knowing to equip customers with relative serial numbers
known characteristically secure for longevity and lack of problematic
issues.

I can as well see the numbers you're citing, although the question
remains, how much incontrovertible faith are you willing to place in
what you are told by others, and what you are told by slick-gloss
experts published in trade material, or as much the manufacturer and
how they are to account a benefit derived from your buying their
product.

Perhaps it is time now that a 3T HDD ought to be as plain, at least as
plain is to me, as it is determine with very little doubt a
distinctiveness apparent between an operational 2T HDD and one that
exhibits deficiency.

I should think. To have even one 3T, or larger, HDD among stacks of
HDDs I do keep. Which I don't.


If I'm understanding your questions correctly,
1. the drive was and is under warranty
2. the cost of returning the defective drive was $0. Seagate provided
a pre-printed shipping label with the replacement drive for where
to return the HD. I was not charged anything because it was
was under warranty. All I had to do was put the defective drive
in the box that the replacement drive came in, wrap the box
and use the shipping service (UPS in my case) to return it to
Seagate. seagate recommended using a staffed UPS store so that
I could get a receipt as proof of return in case for some reason
Seagate did not receive the returned drive.
3. I don't have need to buy hard drives (or other eqpt. FWIW) very
often. I rely upon responses to questions I pose in this NG,
reading articles gleaned from googling, and looking at what's
'popular' or 'best selling' per newegg and a few other vendors.
I built my existing pc around 2010 and the hd was to be the
first major addition I planned to make to it since 2010. It's
not like I buy or install a lot of software. It was built for
use with Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit. I intended to add the HD in
anticipation of learning more about VMs and perhaps resume
learning more programming.
4. The statistics I cited were based on my observation after reading
of the comments at newegg for both the Seagate and the WD models
that had interested me. They're not from the manufacturer or
some independent testing lab. As far as I can tell, the mfrs do
not publish that type data. My methodology was to look at the %
of 1-star ratings, and read through 20 or so reviews (most recent
first) to get a "feel" for what people were complaining or
praising. My overwhelming impression about the 1-star ratings
was that the person gave that rating because the drive was DOA.
5. In lieu of recognized third party labs publishing actual numbers, I
am left with doing what has continually been recommended in this
NG - use them cautiously.
6. My previous experience using a Seagate drive was around 1997. I put
two Seagate Barracude SCSI drives because they were rated as best
of class for enterprise environment at that time, and my thoughts
were that if major businesses were using them based on quality
and reliability and I could afford it, then that was sufficient
reason. I value reliability and quality. The next build I moved
to using WD drives to fit a more modest budget and because
IIRC the qualty of Seagate drives, as WD IIRC, was starting to
decline given what users were saying.
6. It was my first experience with a 3TB installation. I chose the 3TB
model because newegg offered it a price that was reasonable when
compared to what they had on sale then, and I was not interested
in a larger drive due to price and unfamiliarity with using those
sized drives. I still had 1TB across three drives in reserve, so
a really large drive (4+TB did not make sense given my usage.

So as a sample size of 1, my experience wrt the DOA drives could just
be one of those outrageous outliers. All I can say is that I'm
crossing my fingers and hope that I don't experience any more problems
with the HD.

John
  #14  
Old June 16th 18, 12:41 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
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Posts: 2,047
Default Unreally Lucky HDD

On Fri, 15 Jun 2018 17:38:15 -0400, Flasherly
wrote:

Cut&dry for an initial sampling, unless you want $30 extra for mine
and a year less warranty. Might offhand want to stay out of the 25%
*rejection rates, even for Seagate.

WD Red 4TB NAS Hard Disk Drive 5400RPM
$124.99 4,519 customer reviews
5 star 75%
4 star 12%
3 star 4%
2 star 3%
1 star 6%

https://www.amazon.com/Red-4TB-Hard-.../dp/B00EHBERSE

4.4 out of 5 stars
8,988 4,519 customer reviews
WD Blue Price: $103.75
5 star 76%
4 star 12%
3 star 3%
2 star 2%
1 star 7%

*. . .not quite a cough. . .

8,154 3.9 out of 5 stars
5 star 61%
4 star 12%
3 star 5%
2 star 5%
1 star 17%
Seagate SATA 6Gb/s 3.5-Inch 4TB Desktop HDD (ST4000DM000)
  #15  
Old June 16th 18, 01:26 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
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Posts: 2,047
Default Unreally Lucky HDD

On Fri, 15 Jun 2018 22:54:36 -0000 (UTC), "Yes"
wrote:

6. My previous experience using a Seagate drive was around 1997. I put
two Seagate Barracude SCSI drives because they were rated as best
of class for enterprise environment at that time, and my thoughts
were that if major businesses were using them based on quality
and reliability and I could afford it, then that was sufficient
reason. I value reliability and quality. The next build I moved
to using WD drives to fit a more modest budget and because
IIRC the qualty of Seagate drives, as WD IIRC, was starting to
decline given what users were saying.
6. It was my first experience with a 3TB installation. I chose the 3TB
model because newegg offered it a price that was reasonable when
compared to what they had on sale then, and I was not interested
in a larger drive due to price and unfamiliarity with using those
sized drives. I still had 1TB across three drives in reserve, so
a really large drive (4+TB did not make sense given my usage.

So as a sample size of 1, my experience wrt the DOA drives could just
be one of those outrageous outliers. All I can say is that I'm
crossing my fingers and hope that I don't experience any more problems
with the HD.


Thanks John. I've interchangeably went with Seagates since MFM, RLL,
and first IDE 40G drives. Yes, there are periods where the
manufacturer will quality vary, including Sea Snakes, where it seems
best just to go with the flow and risk where your interpretation for
reliability would seem best placed. I've also had horrible Western
Digitals, even if an exception for generally proving where fools and
money part. I'm neither laughing, also having returned a 3T drive,
based on my experience with a security-class HDD (intended for camera
installations). I willingly paid the return, at and on my costs, for
that experience. A little less on the price for the ST4000DM000
linked in the prior message, a little less for ratings across a
satisfied purchase base, but given appreciable shipping costs and
customer service - they nonetheless count to your sense of worth and
purchase value. You mentioned, unless I'm misinterpreting, you're
effectively tapped out on returns -- Seagate will only send you so
many replacement warranty issues, three now being your last right to
make a warranty claim? No doubt WD, as would others, have similar
provisos. I've experienced, for the most, a positive reception for HDD
reliability. A minimum effort on my part in part perhaps to check
first for patterns between popular reception among drive model
offerings, and then some regularity for fragmentation maintenance,
undue thrashing, or a general appreciation to correctly meet a type of
software operations normally expected of HDD usage.

Busy, hard-hit WEB servers and a volume of nonstop random distribution
criteria is a scary comparison.

Well, you're over the hump and into a present technology for Mass
Storage. Also on value time now - committed to getting your money's
worth out of a Seagate without further support. I'm not sure how I'll
make the transition after my first attempt with the 3T security-camera
HDD. Perhaps I'll skip it altogether, rather for some ridiculously
priced 8T, or near capacity, HDD of commonly acceptable (a great
subject for the flavor of day) regard.
  #16  
Old June 16th 18, 02:20 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Charlie Hoffpauir
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 322
Default Unreally Lucky HDD

On Fri, 15 Jun 2018 19:41:17 -0400, Flasherly
wrote:

On Fri, 15 Jun 2018 17:38:15 -0400, Flasherly
wrote:

Cut&dry for an initial sampling, unless you want $30 extra for mine
and a year less warranty. Might offhand want to stay out of the 25%
*rejection rates, even for Seagate.

WD Red 4TB NAS Hard Disk Drive 5400RPM
$124.99 4,519 customer reviews
5 star 75%
4 star 12%
3 star 4%
2 star 3%
1 star 6%

https://www.amazon.com/Red-4TB-Hard-.../dp/B00EHBERSE

4.4 out of 5 stars
8,988 4,519 customer reviews
WD Blue Price: $103.75
5 star 76%
4 star 12%
3 star 3%
2 star 2%
1 star 7%

*. . .not quite a cough. . .

8,154 3.9 out of 5 stars
5 star 61%
4 star 12%
3 star 5%
2 star 5%
1 star 17%
Seagate SATA 6Gb/s 3.5-Inch 4TB Desktop HDD (ST4000DM000)


Well, I'd like to know more...
My observation on reading many of the reviews is that the review
posted with a particular drive, for example, isn't really about that
particular model drive at all. Sometimes this is pretty clear, but
often it seems obscured. Did you happen to notice similar instances?
IIRC, I've seen that in reviews on both Amazon and Newegg.
  #17  
Old June 16th 18, 03:36 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Yes[_2_]
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Posts: 86
Default Unreally Lucky HDD

Flasherly wrote:

-- snipped --
You mentioned, unless I'm misinterpreting, you're
effectively tapped out on returns -- Seagate will only send you so
many replacement warranty issues, three now being your last right to
make a warranty claim?
-- snipped --


No, as far as I know. I bought the original HD in April 2018. The
warranty extends till 2020. My impression when talking with the
Seagate representatives is that Seagate would continue to replace a
defective drive with a new one until I got one that worked. The
customer service experience I had after buying the drive and the
follow-up conversations were very direct, pleasant and satisfactory.

The "three times" is a reference that the original drive I bought was
DOA. The replacement drive (number two) Seagate sent me was DOA. The
replacement drive (number three) Seagate sent me to replace drive
number two works. "Crossing my fingers" was meant to convey my hope
that the drive will continue working for its expected life but that,
given that the first two drives were DOA, there is no certainty it will.

I have had very good luck with my hard drives in the past or just don't
put them to a lot of stress to wear them out quickly. In either case,
I don't have a need to buy them very often. Prior to this purchase, I
bought one hard drive (new) in December 2016 for a build. Before that,
I think 2010 was the last time I was in the market for a hard drive(s).
I wouldn't even have bought one now (2018) except that I wanted to add
another drive. So I build a new pc for myself about every seven years
and for the most part do my research when I'm at the point that I can
use the info to actually choose what to build/buy. That's when I start
asking questions in the NG. My impression is that your experience with
pc buuilding is much greater than mine, that you did/do this type of
activity either professionally or as a hobby.

I hope this clarifies what I wrote previously.

John
  #18  
Old June 16th 18, 04:56 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,047
Default Unreally Lucky HDD

On Sat, 16 Jun 2018 14:36:09 -0000 (UTC), "Yes"
wrote:

No, as far as I know. I bought the original HD in April 2018. The
warranty extends till 2020. My impression when talking with the
Seagate representatives is that Seagate would continue to replace a
defective drive with a new one until I got one that worked. The
customer service experience I had after buying the drive and the
follow-up conversations were very direct, pleasant and satisfactory.

The "three times" is a reference that the original drive I bought was
DOA. The replacement drive (number two) Seagate sent me was DOA. The
replacement drive (number three) Seagate sent me to replace drive
number two works. "Crossing my fingers" was meant to convey my hope
that the drive will continue working for its expected life but that,
given that the first two drives were DOA, there is no certainty it will.

I have had very good luck with my hard drives in the past or just don't
put them to a lot of stress to wear them out quickly. In either case,
I don't have a need to buy them very often. Prior to this purchase, I
bought one hard drive (new) in December 2016 for a build. Before that,
I think 2010 was the last time I was in the market for a hard drive(s).
I wouldn't even have bought one now (2018) except that I wanted to add
another drive. So I build a new pc for myself about every seven years
and for the most part do my research when I'm at the point that I can
use the info to actually choose what to build/buy. That's when I start
asking questions in the NG. My impression is that your experience with
pc buuilding is much greater than mine, that you did/do this type of
activity either professionally or as a hobby.

I hope this clarifies what I wrote previously.


That counts, as I said, that you're getting through. Some apparently
don't, with Seagate taking the position they first demonstrate a HDD
fault condition to prove a sufficient clause exists -- their tools vs
possible 3rd-party HDD and SMART diagnostics. And the thread would
seem fairly recent.

https://www.reddit.com/r/DataHoarder...hit_heres_why/

As well, from the horse's mouth
https://www.seagate.com/support/warr...nty-checklist/

To others with different expectations, I wasn't aware of how picky
Seagate can potentially be about the whole physical aspect of
qualifying a condition of a drive warranty. Not offhand that I should
be getting back any kind of "cap" indications on anyone being denied
their full warranty, because the manufacturer is tired of sending out
too many bad drives for replacement to people who can't seem to stop
complaining. Small wonder.

Not good at all -- two drives not powering up new and out of the box.
Although I've never experienced such, I'm not quite sure how far I
might go before pegging my concern-o-meter. Least to mention the
overall inconvenience factor, procedures and to an extent equipment
and demands, all for the one low price in addition to having bought
their product in the first place. They probably like you as well and
with good reason: Not everyone is going to be so agreeable.

You could have physically listened for the faulted drives to spin up,
although I can't imagine anyone actually would want to if the drive
does not subsequently initiate or cannot be picked up through the
BIOS.

I also enjoy building PCs for the most, although I don't now build as
often, to face the same technological changes after some inactivity
from an otherwise satisfactory machine, when that time then comes for
an update.

Nor do I always understand the full implications of a nature overall
of PCs, especially over time, wear and usage, to being more or less
impervious when lamely going about doing things exactly as expected,
if ever actually so performed prior.

HDDs now are equipped with SMART firmware diagnostic readouts. Which
we all will no doubt dutifully watch for reported fault conditions: of
some possible, perhaps, 40 discrete indicators whereby importance is
ranked for a severity among yellow "warnings", before the same, if not
others, turn into dreaded "reds" of eminent failure.

I fear, yes, even HDDs are prone overall to imperfections of a less
obvious nature, crossing our fingers, as you say, simply giving it but
one for an added measure, as I might. Apart from a backup strategy
integral to data, even to computers going back 180K floppies, a SMART
condition, one might wonder, really how smart can that be -- as if
anyone by in large is going to open up the HDD for a modular
replacement, a fix -- or simply turn to ignore it for as long as the
HDD continues to play its role and limp along.

People always have had exceptions, provisions and uncertainty when
dealing in HDDs. And it may be awhile for SDDs to pull them out from
the quagmire.
  #19  
Old June 16th 18, 05:16 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
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Posts: 2,047
Default Unreally Lucky HDD

On Sat, 16 Jun 2018 08:20:12 -0500, Charlie Hoffpauir
wrote:

Well, I'd like to know more...
My observation on reading many of the reviews is that the review
posted with a particular drive, for example, isn't really about that
particular model drive at all. Sometimes this is pretty clear, but
often it seems obscured. Did you happen to notice similar instances?
IIRC, I've seen that in reviews on both Amazon and Newegg.


I tend favor NewEgg, rather once did, as it commanded a premier niche
in hardware supplies. The customer may have been more apt to reflect
it over an HTML selection of some 90 entry reviews, Amazon limits to
perhaps a dozen. Amazon then largely, among no doubt other factors,
negated NewEgg's former domination of technology sales.

Although the prices are near parity, NewEgg changed to require
customers to pay a shipping return in the event the purchase is
unsatisfactory.

Hence for 200 NewEgg reviews, often exhibiting total non-parity, the
same product on Amazon may have 8000 reviews. Can anything, Charlie,
really be clearer than domination from a greatest mass opinion, then
limited to a perspective of a single instance of ten posts linked to
the HTML equivalent to "turn the page"? Of course it can. But it's
going to take better eyes and patience to drill them for relevance I
can provide.

I was looking at a blender on Amazon. Not the two $500 units, the
classy ones with meat in numbers of manufacturer's coveting positive
reviews. This one had only 100 reviews, all mostly positive, and 100
more than a competitive but lesser-regarded brand may hold. And all
of them, highly and very much so, were shills.

Indicators for interpolation and abstracts, short of any science of
actual statistics, yes, such is possible. Asking for 'clarity',
however, is another matter. It's the casino Amazon built, where you
play by Amazon rules on Amazon time. It's also a part of a house,
Amazon built, where the National Security Agency stores its Top Secret
Data, on Amazon cloud services.
  #20  
Old June 16th 18, 06:53 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Larc[_3_]
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Posts: 337
Default Unreally Lucky HDD

On Sat, 16 Jun 2018 14:36:09 -0000 (UTC), "Yes" wrote:

| Flasherly wrote:
|
| -- snipped --
| You mentioned, unless I'm misinterpreting, you're
| effectively tapped out on returns -- Seagate will only send you so
| many replacement warranty issues, three now being your last right to
| make a warranty claim?
| -- snipped --
|
| No, as far as I know. I bought the original HD in April 2018. The
| warranty extends till 2020. My impression when talking with the
| Seagate representatives is that Seagate would continue to replace a
| defective drive with a new one until I got one that worked. The
| customer service experience I had after buying the drive and the
| follow-up conversations were very direct, pleasant and satisfactory.

3 replacements are too many. They could offer to keep replacing units until you get
one that's satisfactory until the cows come home, but that's too much crap to have to
put up with. I usually give anybody a chance to make things right... ONCE, but would
have demanded a refund with the 2nd defective HDD no matter how nice their customer
service people are.

Larc
 




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