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  #1  
Old October 26th 03, 10:51 AM
Someone
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default O/C

Hi,

I have the following configuration:
Mobo: MSI K7T266 Pro2
CPU: AMD Athlon Thunderbird 1400 FSB: 133MHz
OS: WinXP (home)
BIOS: AMI v7.00T
Chipset: VIA KT266/333
Southbridge: VIA VT8233

In the BIOS I have changed the FSB to 143MHz. This results in a CPU speed of
1500MHz and a "Bus speed" (I guess that's the PCI bus?) of 286MHz. I've
found that increasing the FSB further makes the system less stable.

In the BIOS I've also found a setting called clock multiplier which is set
to 10.5x It can be increased to (I think) 16x.

I'm wondering if it is possible to increase the CPU speed without loss of
stability, but I'm not sure how to do that.
Any suggestionas are welcome.

--
--
Someone


  #2  
Old October 26th 03, 12:39 PM
Ben Pope
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Someone wrote:
Hi,

I have the following configuration:
Mobo: MSI K7T266 Pro2
CPU: AMD Athlon Thunderbird 1400 FSB: 133MHz
OS: WinXP (home)
BIOS: AMI v7.00T
Chipset: VIA KT266/333
Southbridge: VIA VT8233

In the BIOS I have changed the FSB to 143MHz. This results in a CPU speed
of 1500MHz and a "Bus speed" (I guess that's the PCI bus?) of 286MHz. I've
found that increasing the FSB further makes the system less stable.


No, 143MHz will be the speed of the FSB, the bus is DDR and so 286M
transfers per second can happen.

PCI bus should be 33MHz, but depending on your chipset, it could have risen
to 33 * (143/133) ~36MHz.

In the BIOS I've also found a setting called clock multiplier which is set
to 10.5x It can be increased to (I think) 16x.

I'm wondering if it is possible to increase the CPU speed without loss of
stability, but I'm not sure how to do that.
Any suggestionas are welcome.


Well that would depend on the source of your instability.

Use Memtest86 to test your RAM... if that shows no errors after 2 passes,
then chances are your instabilty is a result of the CPU or a device on the
PCI or AGP bus.

I'm not sure how fast the Thunderbird cores can go to, but I'm assuming your
Tbird is now running at 143*10.5 = 1500MHz.

Ben
--
I'm not just a number. To many, I'm known as a String...


  #3  
Old October 26th 03, 05:56 PM
Someone
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Ben Pope" schreef in bericht
...
| Someone wrote:
| Hi,
|
| I have the following configuration:
| Mobo: MSI K7T266 Pro2
| CPU: AMD Athlon Thunderbird 1400 FSB: 133MHz
| OS: WinXP (home)
| BIOS: AMI v7.00T
| Chipset: VIA KT266/333
| Southbridge: VIA VT8233
|
| In the BIOS I have changed the FSB to 143MHz. This results in a CPU
speed
| of 1500MHz and a "Bus speed" (I guess that's the PCI bus?) of 286MHz.
I've
| found that increasing the FSB further makes the system less stable.
|
| No, 143MHz will be the speed of the FSB, the bus is DDR and so 286M
| transfers per second can happen.
|
| PCI bus should be 33MHz, but depending on your chipset, it could have
risen
| to 33 * (143/133) ~36MHz.

Ok.

|
| In the BIOS I've also found a setting called clock multiplier which is
set
| to 10.5x It can be increased to (I think) 16x.
|
| I'm wondering if it is possible to increase the CPU speed without loss
of
| stability, but I'm not sure how to do that.
| Any suggestionas are welcome.
|
| Well that would depend on the source of your instability.
|
| Use Memtest86 to test your RAM... if that shows no errors after 2 passes,
| then chances are your instabilty is a result of the CPU or a device on the
| PCI or AGP bus.

There's nothing wrong with the RAM according to MemTest86.

| I'm not sure how fast the Thunderbird cores can go to, but I'm assuming
your

That was my question.

| Tbird is now running at 143*10.5 = 1500MHz.

Correct.

Above a setting of 143 the system reboots continuously and I have to short
out (read reset) the CMOS to return to the factory settings. But that is not
the point I'm trying to make here.

What I wanted to know is if (1) it is possible to take the Thunderbird to
speeds above 1500MHz and (2) how to achieve that. I am guessing that the
clock multiplier has something to do with that, but as I have no idea *what*
it does exactly I'm hesitant to change it. I was hoping someone would say
something like: "take the FSB to xxxMHz then change the clock multiplier to
YYx and you have a zzzzMHz system".
At 1500MHz the BIOS reports a CPU temperature of around 60C.

--
SomeOne


  #4  
Old October 26th 03, 06:11 PM
Ben Pope
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Someone wrote:
Above a setting of 143 the system reboots continuously and I have to short
out (read reset) the CMOS to return to the factory settings. But that is
not the point I'm trying to make here.


Well then it's probably safe to say that you can't go beyond 143.

What I wanted to know is if (1) it is possible to take the Thunderbird to
speeds above 1500MHz and (2) how to achieve that. I am guessing that the
clock multiplier has something to do with that, but as I have no idea
*what* it does exactly I'm hesitant to change it.


143MHz*10.5 = 1500MHz

FSB * Multiplier = CPU speed.

I was hoping someone
would say something like: "take the FSB to xxxMHz then change the clock
multiplier to YYx and you have a zzzzMHz system".
At 1500MHz the BIOS reports a CPU temperature of around 60C.



Well thats all well and good, but it depends on far too may factors that are
unmeasurable, each system is different.

If you're settled on 143FSB (which it seems you are) then increase the
multiplier a step to 11, giving you 143MHz * 11 = 1573MHz. If you can't
boot with the new multiplier then you're at max. That could be due to
thermal problems, or the transistors not charging fast enough in the chip...
if thats the case, voltage will help, but temps need to be kept under
control as they tend to soar with more voltage. Since you have no idea what
the core temperature is with the old Tbirds, I don't know how you really do
that - I guess by having a safe margin on the socket temp.

Ben
--
I'm not just a number. To many, I'm known as a String...


  #5  
Old October 26th 03, 08:01 PM
dr_hardware
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Someone" wrote in message
...
Hi,

I have the following configuration:
Mobo: MSI K7T266 Pro2
CPU: AMD Athlon Thunderbird 1400 FSB: 133MHz
OS: WinXP (home)
BIOS: AMI v7.00T
Chipset: VIA KT266/333
Southbridge: VIA VT8233

In the BIOS I have changed the FSB to 143MHz. This results in a CPU speed

of
1500MHz and a "Bus speed" (I guess that's the PCI bus?) of 286MHz. I've
found that increasing the FSB further makes the system less stable.

In the BIOS I've also found a setting called clock multiplier which is set
to 10.5x It can be increased to (I think) 16x.

I'm wondering if it is possible to increase the CPU speed without loss of
stability, but I'm not sure how to do that.
Any suggestionas are welcome.

--
--
Someone



The Thunderbird 1400 MHz CPU didn't run much above nominal speed. 1500 MHz
is about it with that core. Increasing Vcore will help stabilize it at
higher speeds, but you're getting about all you'll get out of it now.
You won't be able to go higher in FSB because the PCI (and AGP) bus will be
out of spec and could cause data corruption. At 143 MHz FSB, the PCI bus is
already at 36 MHz.




  #6  
Old October 26th 03, 10:16 PM
Wes Newell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 26 Oct 2003 18:56:46 +0100, Someone wrote:

What I wanted to know is if (1) it is possible to take the Thunderbird to
speeds above 1500MHz and (2) how to achieve that. I am guessing that the
clock multiplier has something to do with that, but as I have no idea *what*
it does exactly I'm hesitant to change it. I was hoping someone would say
something like: "take the FSB to xxxMHz then change the clock multiplier to
YYx and you have a zzzzMHz system".
At 1500MHz the BIOS reports a CPU temperature of around 60C.


Multiplier times FSB equals cpu clock speed. With extreme cooling (below
0) you can probably get more than 1500MHz out of it, but why. Just buy a
new XP cpu for $60 and get much more on air. If you're just messing around
try 11x133, 12.5x133, or whatever works. Raise vcore to max first. Make
sure you have a good cooler.

--
Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.html
  #7  
Old October 27th 03, 08:49 AM
iTsMeMa
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I'm running a 1.4 tBird on a K7T-LE and best I've ever got was 1562 mHZ or
11X143. I played with voltage, cooling and different ram, all to no avail.
Recently a buddy loaned me his Barton XP2500 to play with.
I was able to run at 12.5 X 152 or 1900 mHZ.
Only change was the cpu, I even ran it under the 1.65 volt recommendation.
I have to agree with Wes, buy an XP chip, they're cheap.
Do yourself a favour and get an XP2100 or higher to take advantage of the
upper multipliers.
I dont believe your board supports the 5th bit.

Regards,

Garry.

"Someone" wrote in message
...

"Ben Pope" schreef in bericht
...
| Someone wrote:
| Hi,
|
| I have the following configuration:
| Mobo: MSI K7T266 Pro2
| CPU: AMD Athlon Thunderbird 1400 FSB: 133MHz
| OS: WinXP (home)
| BIOS: AMI v7.00T
| Chipset: VIA KT266/333
| Southbridge: VIA VT8233
|
| In the BIOS I have changed the FSB to 143MHz. This results in a CPU
speed
| of 1500MHz and a "Bus speed" (I guess that's the PCI bus?) of 286MHz.
I've
| found that increasing the FSB further makes the system less stable.
|
| No, 143MHz will be the speed of the FSB, the bus is DDR and so 286M
| transfers per second can happen.
|
| PCI bus should be 33MHz, but depending on your chipset, it could have
risen
| to 33 * (143/133) ~36MHz.

Ok.

|
| In the BIOS I've also found a setting called clock multiplier which is
set
| to 10.5x It can be increased to (I think) 16x.
|
| I'm wondering if it is possible to increase the CPU speed without loss
of
| stability, but I'm not sure how to do that.
| Any suggestionas are welcome.
|
| Well that would depend on the source of your instability.
|
| Use Memtest86 to test your RAM... if that shows no errors after 2

passes,
| then chances are your instabilty is a result of the CPU or a device on

the
| PCI or AGP bus.

There's nothing wrong with the RAM according to MemTest86.

| I'm not sure how fast the Thunderbird cores can go to, but I'm assuming
your

That was my question.

| Tbird is now running at 143*10.5 = 1500MHz.

Correct.

Above a setting of 143 the system reboots continuously and I have to short
out (read reset) the CMOS to return to the factory settings. But that is

not
the point I'm trying to make here.

What I wanted to know is if (1) it is possible to take the Thunderbird to
speeds above 1500MHz and (2) how to achieve that. I am guessing that the
clock multiplier has something to do with that, but as I have no idea

*what*
it does exactly I'm hesitant to change it. I was hoping someone would say
something like: "take the FSB to xxxMHz then change the clock multiplier

to
YYx and you have a zzzzMHz system".
At 1500MHz the BIOS reports a CPU temperature of around 60C.

--
SomeOne




 




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