A computer components & hardware forum. HardwareBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » HardwareBanter forum » Processors » Overclocking
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

how much can i overclock my computer en how



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old July 5th 03, 07:16 PM
MiniDisc_2k2
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default how much can i overclock my computer en how


"Joop van vugt" wrote in message
...
Hello ik have a proccessor pentium 4 2.4 fsb 533


Same as me. Good overclocking choice (I'll tell you why in a second).

i have also 528 rimm memory (pc4200)


Wow that's fast.

And i have a asus motherboard type p4t533


Perfectly suitable.

I will now overclock the computer
and i dont no how far i can go its nou running on 133


Actually that's helpful, considering that it causes the multiplier to be
low. If you had a 100MHz 2.4Ghz, you would have a 24x multiplier which is
much harder to overclock.

maby anyone can help me please
greetings Joop




Well your motherboard should support changing the FSB through the BIOS in
increments of 1MHz. My P4b 2.4 was able to go up to 2.95GHz. Try a google
search for "overclocking basics," as well as look at www.sharkyextreme.com
's articles on how to overclock. But here's a brief overview.

Your 2.4GHz processor has something called a CPU multiplier. The multiplier
can be found by dividing the speed (2400MHz, or actually 2394MHz) by the
system bus (133MHz). Therefore, your multiplier is 18x. This is crucial to
determining how much overclocking potential you have. Because intel
processors have a "locked multiplier" (that is, you can't change it), the
only way you're going to be able to overclock is by increasing the system
bus. The higher your multiplier is, the harder it is to increase the system
bus, because each 1MHz increase in the system bus causes an 18MHz jump in
the CPU speed. Therefore, you cannot increase the system bus too much
because your CPU simply cannot go too fast. Also note that your FSB
multiplier is 4x (533/4 is about 133). Thus, your FSB increases by 4MHz for
every 1MHz increase to the system bus. Usually, people start off by
increasing the system bus by 10MHz at a time. This will cause a 180MHz
difference to your CPU and a 40MHz difference to your FSB. As you get to
higher speeds, you'll probably want to adjust your CPU's voltage, commonly
referred to as VCore. At default, it is set to 1.55V. If your motherboard
does not support adjusting this, your overclocking abilities are going to be
severely limited. If, however, you can increase this, increasing your VCore
will make your system more stable at higher speeds. Don't set it too high,
though, as it will cause your temperatures to go higher and can cause damage
to your CPU if it's too high. Generally, a 10-15% increase is safe, and not
many people like to go higher than that. My VCore is currently set at
1.675V, an 8% increase. I don't need to set it higher because my CPU is
currently stable, and if I were to increase the system bus more, my CPU
fails to post. Here's the steps you should take while overclocking:

**PLEASE NOTE: While doing this proceedure, you must set your RAM, PCI, and
AGP divider settings to keep your RAM PCI and AGP clocks standard. If they
are not standard, you will probably encounter errors.**

*****SECOND NOTE: You cannot hold me responsible for any damage caused by
following the steps below. By following the steps below you assume all risks
that are inherent from overclocking your system. Note that overclocking your
system probably violates and voids warranties which may be standing on your
processor or other peripherals.*****


1. Increase your VCore by 5%, if possible.
2. Increase your system bus by 10MHz
3. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 4. If not, give up on
overclocking
4. Increase your system bus by 5MHz
5. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 6. If not, go to step 7.
6. Are you satisfied with how much overclocking you've done? If yes, go to
step 16. If not, go to step 4.
7. Increase your VCore by .025V
8. Are you above 15% increase to VCore? If yes, go to step 10. If not, go to
step 9.
9. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 6. If not, go to step 7.
10. Bring your VCore back down to the 15% increase level
11. Bring your system bus down by 1MHz.
12. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 13. If not, go to step 11.
13. Bring your VCore down .025V. (If you're already at 1.55V, go to step 16)
14. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 13. If not, go to step 15.
15. Bring your VCore back up to the last setting that succeeded.
16. Load windows
17. Is your system stable? If yes, go to step 20. Otherwise go to step 18.
18. Increase your VCore by .025V. If you're already above 15% increase,
decrease your system bus by 1MHz.
19. Go to step 16.
20. Run a CPU and RAM extensive program. Preferrably some kind of 3D game.
21. Are there any unexpected things in the game (wierd dots across the
screen, images not rendering properly)? If yes, go to step 22. If not, go to
step 24.
22. Increase your VCore by .025V. If you're already above 15% increase,
decrease your system bus by 1MHz.
23. Go to step 20.
24. You're done.

Following these steps, I was able to bring my 2.4GHz/533MHz P4 to a
2.95GHz/656MHz processor. Much cheaper than the available 3.02GHz. I was
hoping to get it above 3GHz but I'll settle for that. Maybe you'll have
better luck.


Good luck!
--
MiniDisc_2k2
To reply, replace nospam.com with cox dot net.


  #2  
Old July 5th 03, 11:52 PM
Joop van vugt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

olricht but how high is your fsb and vcore when i will try to same als you
greetings joop

"MiniDisc_2k2" schreef in bericht
...

"Joop van vugt" wrote in message
...
Hello ik have a proccessor pentium 4 2.4 fsb 533


Same as me. Good overclocking choice (I'll tell you why in a second).

i have also 528 rimm memory (pc4200)


Wow that's fast.

And i have a asus motherboard type p4t533


Perfectly suitable.

I will now overclock the computer
and i dont no how far i can go its nou running on 133


Actually that's helpful, considering that it causes the multiplier to be
low. If you had a 100MHz 2.4Ghz, you would have a 24x multiplier which is
much harder to overclock.

maby anyone can help me please
greetings Joop




Well your motherboard should support changing the FSB through the BIOS in
increments of 1MHz. My P4b 2.4 was able to go up to 2.95GHz. Try a google
search for "overclocking basics," as well as look at www.sharkyextreme.com
's articles on how to overclock. But here's a brief overview.

Your 2.4GHz processor has something called a CPU multiplier. The

multiplier
can be found by dividing the speed (2400MHz, or actually 2394MHz) by the
system bus (133MHz). Therefore, your multiplier is 18x. This is crucial to
determining how much overclocking potential you have. Because intel
processors have a "locked multiplier" (that is, you can't change it), the
only way you're going to be able to overclock is by increasing the system
bus. The higher your multiplier is, the harder it is to increase the

system
bus, because each 1MHz increase in the system bus causes an 18MHz jump in
the CPU speed. Therefore, you cannot increase the system bus too much
because your CPU simply cannot go too fast. Also note that your FSB
multiplier is 4x (533/4 is about 133). Thus, your FSB increases by 4MHz

for
every 1MHz increase to the system bus. Usually, people start off by
increasing the system bus by 10MHz at a time. This will cause a 180MHz
difference to your CPU and a 40MHz difference to your FSB. As you get to
higher speeds, you'll probably want to adjust your CPU's voltage, commonly
referred to as VCore. At default, it is set to 1.55V. If your motherboard
does not support adjusting this, your overclocking abilities are going to

be
severely limited. If, however, you can increase this, increasing your

VCore
will make your system more stable at higher speeds. Don't set it too high,
though, as it will cause your temperatures to go higher and can cause

damage
to your CPU if it's too high. Generally, a 10-15% increase is safe, and

not
many people like to go higher than that. My VCore is currently set at
1.675V, an 8% increase. I don't need to set it higher because my CPU is
currently stable, and if I were to increase the system bus more, my CPU
fails to post. Here's the steps you should take while overclocking:

**PLEASE NOTE: While doing this proceedure, you must set your RAM, PCI,

and
AGP divider settings to keep your RAM PCI and AGP clocks standard. If they
are not standard, you will probably encounter errors.**

*****SECOND NOTE: You cannot hold me responsible for any damage caused by
following the steps below. By following the steps below you assume all

risks
that are inherent from overclocking your system. Note that overclocking

your
system probably violates and voids warranties which may be standing on

your
processor or other peripherals.*****


1. Increase your VCore by 5%, if possible.
2. Increase your system bus by 10MHz
3. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 4. If not, give up on
overclocking
4. Increase your system bus by 5MHz
5. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 6. If not, go to step 7.
6. Are you satisfied with how much overclocking you've done? If yes, go to
step 16. If not, go to step 4.
7. Increase your VCore by .025V
8. Are you above 15% increase to VCore? If yes, go to step 10. If not, go

to
step 9.
9. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 6. If not, go to step 7.
10. Bring your VCore back down to the 15% increase level
11. Bring your system bus down by 1MHz.
12. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 13. If not, go to step 11.
13. Bring your VCore down .025V. (If you're already at 1.55V, go to step

16)
14. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 13. If not, go to step 15.
15. Bring your VCore back up to the last setting that succeeded.
16. Load windows
17. Is your system stable? If yes, go to step 20. Otherwise go to step 18.
18. Increase your VCore by .025V. If you're already above 15% increase,
decrease your system bus by 1MHz.
19. Go to step 16.
20. Run a CPU and RAM extensive program. Preferrably some kind of 3D game.
21. Are there any unexpected things in the game (wierd dots across the
screen, images not rendering properly)? If yes, go to step 22. If not, go

to
step 24.
22. Increase your VCore by .025V. If you're already above 15% increase,
decrease your system bus by 1MHz.
23. Go to step 20.
24. You're done.

Following these steps, I was able to bring my 2.4GHz/533MHz P4 to a
2.95GHz/656MHz processor. Much cheaper than the available 3.02GHz. I was
hoping to get it above 3GHz but I'll settle for that. Maybe you'll have
better luck.


Good luck!
--
MiniDisc_2k2
To reply, replace nospam.com with cox dot net.




  #3  
Old July 6th 03, 12:58 AM
MiniDisc_2k2
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Please note that there's a difference between the system bus and the front
side bus. I'm not even sure if I'm right when I say this or if they even can
be used interchangably, but AFAIK, the system bus is what you overclock, the
FSB is the speed of transfer between RAM and CPU. I consistently see people
referring to the system bus as the FSB, and I'm not sure if they're right in
saying that. I've even seen tutorials do that. IIRC, the FSB is speed of
data transfer, system bus is the thing starting at 133MHz. Anyways,
following that logic, here's my stats (I'm telling you what it's rated, and
what I overclocked it to). Please note that the only thing that I
overclocked was the system bus, VCore, and RAM dividers, everything else is
just simple multiplication.

System bus: Rated 133MHz, Overclocked to 164MHz
Front Side Bus: Rated 533MHz, Overclocked to 656MHz
CPU Speed: Rated 2.40GHz, Overclocked to 2.95GHz
VCo Rated 1.550V, Set at 1.675V
RAM Speed: Rated DDR400, Overclocked to DDR410

One more note. I can't tell you precisely what my RAM, PCI, and AGP dividers
are set to. My BIOS simply gives me a bunch of settings for the RAM, so I
don't have to worry about the divider settings. I simply picked the one
closest to DDR400 without going under. RAM is really hard to overclock so I
just didn't worry about it. Also, the PCI and AGP settings for my BIOS are
async, that means that they are set manually, no worrying about dividers. If
your motherboard doesn't support these options, you'll have to do the
calculations yourself.

Good luck!
MiniDisc_2k2


"Joop van vugt" wrote in message
...
olricht but how high is your fsb and vcore when i will try to same als you
greetings joop

"MiniDisc_2k2" schreef in bericht
...

"Joop van vugt" wrote in message
...
Hello ik have a proccessor pentium 4 2.4 fsb 533


Same as me. Good overclocking choice (I'll tell you why in a second).

i have also 528 rimm memory (pc4200)


Wow that's fast.

And i have a asus motherboard type p4t533


Perfectly suitable.

I will now overclock the computer
and i dont no how far i can go its nou running on 133


Actually that's helpful, considering that it causes the multiplier to be
low. If you had a 100MHz 2.4Ghz, you would have a 24x multiplier which

is
much harder to overclock.

maby anyone can help me please
greetings Joop




Well your motherboard should support changing the FSB through the BIOS

in
increments of 1MHz. My P4b 2.4 was able to go up to 2.95GHz. Try a

google
search for "overclocking basics," as well as look at

www.sharkyextreme.com
's articles on how to overclock. But here's a brief overview.

Your 2.4GHz processor has something called a CPU multiplier. The

multiplier
can be found by dividing the speed (2400MHz, or actually 2394MHz) by the
system bus (133MHz). Therefore, your multiplier is 18x. This is crucial

to
determining how much overclocking potential you have. Because intel
processors have a "locked multiplier" (that is, you can't change it),

the
only way you're going to be able to overclock is by increasing the

system
bus. The higher your multiplier is, the harder it is to increase the

system
bus, because each 1MHz increase in the system bus causes an 18MHz jump

in
the CPU speed. Therefore, you cannot increase the system bus too much
because your CPU simply cannot go too fast. Also note that your FSB
multiplier is 4x (533/4 is about 133). Thus, your FSB increases by 4MHz

for
every 1MHz increase to the system bus. Usually, people start off by
increasing the system bus by 10MHz at a time. This will cause a 180MHz
difference to your CPU and a 40MHz difference to your FSB. As you get to
higher speeds, you'll probably want to adjust your CPU's voltage,

commonly
referred to as VCore. At default, it is set to 1.55V. If your

motherboard
does not support adjusting this, your overclocking abilities are going

to
be
severely limited. If, however, you can increase this, increasing your

VCore
will make your system more stable at higher speeds. Don't set it too

high,
though, as it will cause your temperatures to go higher and can cause

damage
to your CPU if it's too high. Generally, a 10-15% increase is safe, and

not
many people like to go higher than that. My VCore is currently set at
1.675V, an 8% increase. I don't need to set it higher because my CPU is
currently stable, and if I were to increase the system bus more, my CPU
fails to post. Here's the steps you should take while overclocking:

**PLEASE NOTE: While doing this proceedure, you must set your RAM, PCI,

and
AGP divider settings to keep your RAM PCI and AGP clocks standard. If

they
are not standard, you will probably encounter errors.**

*****SECOND NOTE: You cannot hold me responsible for any damage caused

by
following the steps below. By following the steps below you assume all

risks
that are inherent from overclocking your system. Note that overclocking

your
system probably violates and voids warranties which may be standing on

your
processor or other peripherals.*****


1. Increase your VCore by 5%, if possible.
2. Increase your system bus by 10MHz
3. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 4. If not, give up on
overclocking
4. Increase your system bus by 5MHz
5. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 6. If not, go to step 7.
6. Are you satisfied with how much overclocking you've done? If yes, go

to
step 16. If not, go to step 4.
7. Increase your VCore by .025V
8. Are you above 15% increase to VCore? If yes, go to step 10. If not,

go
to
step 9.
9. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 6. If not, go to step 7.
10. Bring your VCore back down to the 15% increase level
11. Bring your system bus down by 1MHz.
12. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 13. If not, go to step 11.
13. Bring your VCore down .025V. (If you're already at 1.55V, go to step

16)
14. Does your system POST? If yes, go to step 13. If not, go to step 15.
15. Bring your VCore back up to the last setting that succeeded.
16. Load windows
17. Is your system stable? If yes, go to step 20. Otherwise go to step

18.
18. Increase your VCore by .025V. If you're already above 15% increase,
decrease your system bus by 1MHz.
19. Go to step 16.
20. Run a CPU and RAM extensive program. Preferrably some kind of 3D

game.
21. Are there any unexpected things in the game (wierd dots across the
screen, images not rendering properly)? If yes, go to step 22. If not,

go
to
step 24.
22. Increase your VCore by .025V. If you're already above 15% increase,
decrease your system bus by 1MHz.
23. Go to step 20.
24. You're done.

Following these steps, I was able to bring my 2.4GHz/533MHz P4 to a
2.95GHz/656MHz processor. Much cheaper than the available 3.02GHz. I was
hoping to get it above 3GHz but I'll settle for that. Maybe you'll have
better luck.


Good luck!
--
MiniDisc_2k2
To reply, replace nospam.com with cox dot net.






 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Off Topic - Lou Costello buys a computer :J:W:B: General 0 September 1st 04 03:37 PM
Hewlett-Packard & Circuit City Richard E Sgrignoli General 2 March 17th 04 09:42 AM
How to Fix Your Computer Ben Dellar Overclocking AMD Processors 4 November 12th 03 01:39 AM
how to trace a stolen computer ? General 3 October 9th 03 03:14 AM
Silent Computer - Advice David Taylor General 49 October 7th 03 11:26 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 HardwareBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.