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TUSL2 CMOS reset?



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 8th 03, 08:18 AM
Paul
external usenet poster
 
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Default TUSL2 CMOS reset?

In article , "RHD" wrote:

Hi,

I have a TUSL2 motherboard, is there a way I can reset the CMOS?

I have read through the manual and I can't find any info on it.

I have tried to install windows 2000 twice and flashed the BIOS also and I
still get corruption error messages when installing windows.

Any help appriciated.

Would removing the battery do it?

Thanks

-RHD


A PDF version of the manual is he

ftp://ftp.asus.com.tw/pub/ASUS/mb/so...e811_tusl2.pdf (pg.59)

It is the section "Forgot the password?" that contains the clear
CMOS procedure in the older manuals. If searching the PDF manual, I
look for CLRTC or RTC (real time clock) to try to find where the procedure
is hidden.

In this case, there is no mention of the battery, so I guess shorting
the solder points is enough. Note the "unplug your computer" step is
very important, as sometimes the power for the RTC circuit is connected
to +5VSB (the standby supply), and if you short the solder points while
+5VSB is still powered, parts of the circuit can be damaged (people
have reported burning up a diode by doing that).

From the manual -

"To erase the RTC RAM:

(1) Unplug your computer,
(2) Short the solder points,
(3) Turn ON your computer,
(4) Hold down Delete during bootup and enter BIOS setup
to re-enter user preferences."

In terms of the circuit, in some CMOS battery circuits, there is a
current limiting resistor coming from the battery. If you short the
solder points, this resistor prevents the battery current from becoming
too high. Power also comes from +5VSB, but a current limiting resistor
cannot be placed on that side of the circuit, because when the computer
is running, much more current is drawn from +5VSB. Without a current
limiting resistor, there is much more potential for damage when shorting
the solder points. That is the reason for unplugging the computer.

Note that some Asus manuals have incorrect procedures listed for
clearing the CMOS. That is why it is important when going to the download
site, to click the "Manual" button, and see if there are any documents
that contain corrections to the manual (usually called an "insert").

http://www.asus.com.tw/support/download/download.aspx (download page)

HTH,
Paul
  #2  
Old July 8th 03, 12:38 PM
RHD
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks Paul


"Paul" wrote in message
...
In article , "RHD"

wrote:

Hi,

I have a TUSL2 motherboard, is there a way I can reset the CMOS?

I have read through the manual and I can't find any info on it.

I have tried to install windows 2000 twice and flashed the BIOS also and

I
still get corruption error messages when installing windows.

Any help appriciated.

Would removing the battery do it?

Thanks

-RHD


A PDF version of the manual is he

ftp://ftp.asus.com.tw/pub/ASUS/mb/so...e811_tusl2.pdf

(pg.59)

It is the section "Forgot the password?" that contains the clear
CMOS procedure in the older manuals. If searching the PDF manual, I
look for CLRTC or RTC (real time clock) to try to find where the procedure
is hidden.

In this case, there is no mention of the battery, so I guess shorting
the solder points is enough. Note the "unplug your computer" step is
very important, as sometimes the power for the RTC circuit is connected
to +5VSB (the standby supply), and if you short the solder points while
+5VSB is still powered, parts of the circuit can be damaged (people
have reported burning up a diode by doing that).

From the manual -

"To erase the RTC RAM:

(1) Unplug your computer,
(2) Short the solder points,
(3) Turn ON your computer,
(4) Hold down Delete during bootup and enter BIOS setup
to re-enter user preferences."

In terms of the circuit, in some CMOS battery circuits, there is a
current limiting resistor coming from the battery. If you short the
solder points, this resistor prevents the battery current from becoming
too high. Power also comes from +5VSB, but a current limiting resistor
cannot be placed on that side of the circuit, because when the computer
is running, much more current is drawn from +5VSB. Without a current
limiting resistor, there is much more potential for damage when shorting
the solder points. That is the reason for unplugging the computer.

Note that some Asus manuals have incorrect procedures listed for
clearing the CMOS. That is why it is important when going to the download
site, to click the "Manual" button, and see if there are any documents
that contain corrections to the manual (usually called an "insert").

http://www.asus.com.tw/support/download/download.aspx (download page)

HTH,
Paul



 




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