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Can you copy a whole audio CD to HDD in native format, no "ripping"?, & many other Q's



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 28th 05, 12:50 AM
external usenet poster
 
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Default Can you copy a whole audio CD to HDD in native format, no "ripping"?, & many other Q's

I may not be understanding this right, but IIRC ripping degrades sound
quality, then re-burning to CD more so (depending on compression & codec).
Is there any way to burn the exact digital image of what was on the 1st CD
to a 2nd? How bout to the HDD and be able to play it from there? If so,
what prog(s) do I need for each? Is an audio CD all one continuous file,
and does that force you to either play the whole thing from HDD, or
convert to other format? If other format, which and what sampling should
one go with to preserve 100% discernable sound quality (and I mean on an
audiophile type system)? Is it possible, or am I better off with a mega
CD changer? Seen em up to 400 disks for $300, so not too bad. But, still
would be nice to share my collection with my bro, and visa versa.
--
__________________________________________________ ___
For email response, or CC, please mailto:see.my.sig.4.addr(at)bigfoot.com.
Yeah, it's really a real address
  #2  
Old March 28th 05, 02:35 AM
Dan G
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Posts: n/a
Default

You are quite mistaken. Ripping does nothing to sound quality, and neither
does burning. Each track is a separate file, and can be copied as is. Files
on an audio CD show as ".cda" file types, which is the same thing as ".wav".
Ripping merely saves them to HD in ".wav" files which can be played in any
media player.

Suggest you start by reading the help files from your burning program.


wrote in message
...
I may not be understanding this right, but IIRC ripping degrades sound
quality, then re-burning to CD more so (depending on compression & codec).
Is there any way to burn the exact digital image of what was on the 1st CD
to a 2nd? How bout to the HDD and be able to play it from there? If so,
what prog(s) do I need for each? Is an audio CD all one continuous file,
and does that force you to either play the whole thing from HDD, or
convert to other format? If other format, which and what sampling should
one go with to preserve 100% discernable sound quality (and I mean on an
audiophile type system)? Is it possible, or am I better off with a mega
CD changer? Seen em up to 400 disks for $300, so not too bad. But, still
would be nice to share my collection with my bro, and visa versa.
--
__________________________________________________ ___
For email response, or CC, please mailto:see.my.sig.4.addr(at)bigfoot.com.
Yeah, it's really a real address



  #3  
Old March 28th 05, 04:54 AM
wayfarrer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dan G.

You may need to do some reading yourself about this subject. Did you ever check
the file size of a CDA file and wonder why it's so small as compared to its wave
equivalent? There are all only 1KB. They are just pointers, not files. See this
article for some basic info about .cda files and then Google for mo

http://www.unrelatedinventions.com/A.../.cdafiles.htm

"Dan G" wrote in message
...
You are quite mistaken. Ripping does nothing to sound quality, and neither
does burning. Each track is a separate file, and can be copied as is. Files
on an audio CD show as ".cda" file types, which is the same thing as ".wav".
Ripping merely saves them to HD in ".wav" files which can be played in any
media player.

Suggest you start by reading the help files from your burning program.


wrote in message
...
I may not be understanding this right, but IIRC ripping degrades sound
quality, then re-burning to CD more so (depending on compression & codec).
Is there any way to burn the exact digital image of what was on the 1st CD
to a 2nd? How bout to the HDD and be able to play it from there? If so,
what prog(s) do I need for each? Is an audio CD all one continuous file,
and does that force you to either play the whole thing from HDD, or
convert to other format? If other format, which and what sampling should
one go with to preserve 100% discernable sound quality (and I mean on an
audiophile type system)? Is it possible, or am I better off with a mega
CD changer? Seen em up to 400 disks for $300, so not too bad. But, still
would be nice to share my collection with my bro, and visa versa.
--
__________________________________________________ ___
For email response, or CC, please mailto:see.my.sig.4.addr(at)bigfoot.com.
Yeah, it's really a real address





  #4  
Old March 28th 05, 08:19 AM
Graham Mayor
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Posts: n/a
Default

It doesn't alter the basic premise that ripping CD Audio (CDA) to WAV does
not degrade the sound quality nor does writing WAV back to CD Audio - indeed
it is possible that the re-written disc could be better than the original by
virtue of having a lower error count for the player to contend with.

--

Graham Mayor





wayfarrer wrote:
Dan G.

You may need to do some reading yourself about this subject. Did you
ever check the file size of a CDA file and wonder why it's so small
as compared to its wave equivalent? There are all only 1KB. They are
just pointers, not files. See this article for some basic info about
.cda files and then Google for mo

http://www.unrelatedinventions.com/A.../.cdafiles.htm

"Dan G" wrote in message
...
You are quite mistaken. Ripping does nothing to sound quality, and
neither does burning. Each track is a separate file, and can be
copied as is. Files on an audio CD show as ".cda" file types, which
is the same thing as ".wav". Ripping merely saves them to HD in
".wav" files which can be played in any media player.

Suggest you start by reading the help files from your burning
program.


wrote in message
...
I may not be understanding this right, but IIRC ripping degrades
sound quality, then re-burning to CD more so (depending on
compression & codec). Is there any way to burn the exact digital
image of what was on the 1st CD to a 2nd? How bout to the HDD and
be able to play it from there? If so, what prog(s) do I need for
each? Is an audio CD all one continuous file, and does that force
you to either play the whole thing from HDD, or convert to other
format? If other format, which and what sampling should one go
with to preserve 100% discernable sound quality (and I mean on an
audiophile type system)? Is it possible, or am I better off with a
mega CD changer? Seen em up to 400 disks for $300, so not too bad.
But, still would be nice to share my collection with my bro, and
visa versa. -- __________________________________________________ ___
For email response, or CC, please
mailto:see.my.sig.4.addr(at)bigfoot.com. Yeah, it's really a real
address



 




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