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  #1  
Old April 9th 21, 10:59 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
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Beyond variances between NAND type and design, for JEDEC claims
interpretively given unrefreshed SSD memory, within an inoperable
stasis for an least affected, pure state of hypothetical storage, that
data loss is a potential factor within a week;- whereas another and
proposition given a web-based hardware site is one of related
temperature coefficients, such that the lower temperature measure over
storage, than what characteristically a SSD is designed to operate at
upon being written to, is a (presumption the) lower subsequent
inoperable temperature will relate adversely upon expected longevity
of data cohesion (an extensively suppositional if populist allowance
at quite some leeway exceeding a former JEDEC's published reception).

(And apt dated for an observation posted five years ago in a
server-type forum.)
  #2  
Old April 9th 21, 12:00 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Paul[_28_]
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Posts: 1,467
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Flasherly wrote:
Beyond variances between NAND type and design, for JEDEC claims
interpretively given unrefreshed SSD memory, within an inoperable
stasis for an least affected, pure state of hypothetical storage, that
data loss is a potential factor within a week;- whereas another and
proposition given a web-based hardware site is one of related
temperature coefficients, such that the lower temperature measure over
storage, than what characteristically a SSD is designed to operate at
upon being written to, is a (presumption the) lower subsequent
inoperable temperature will relate adversely upon expected longevity
of data cohesion (an extensively suppositional if populist allowance
at quite some leeway exceeding a former JEDEC's published reception).

(And apt dated for an observation posted five years ago in a
server-type forum.)


There may be some observations possible at end-of-life,
but generally not seen during normal life period.

Writing at low temperature, increases damage to flash cells
but the data lasts longer.

Writing at high temperature, comes closer to annealing,
reduces wear, but may also have the data lasting less long.

Powerful ECC is used to hide these factors and make the
device function for 3000 writes on TLC (less for QLC).

Paul
  #3  
Old April 9th 21, 02:46 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
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Posts: 2,407
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2021 07:00:14 -0400, Paul
wrote:

Writing at low temperature, increases damage to flash cells
but the data lasts longer.

Writing at high temperature, comes closer to annealing,
reduces wear, but may also have the data lasting less long.

Powerful ECC is used to hide these factors and make the
device function for 3000 writes on TLC (less for QLC).


My best SSDs (a medium rating) run as much as 20 degrees (F) cooler
than alongside a couple of (lesser rated and most inexpensive) QLC
class and decidedly hotter operating SSDs. Were incidence leveled,
however, into some hypothetical independence, for neither having
occurred significance for their main matrix of total terabytes
written, whereupon removal of the SSD is effected in its entirety, of
one residual to a storage consideration, temperature, independent of
electrical operation, most will then factor for SSD data retention
cohesion. Anywhere from 1 to 404 weeks seems a peculiar way to toss
the dice. (Anandtech's, indirectly, unfortunately for their link not
to have survived my software buffer, as I'd formerly construed the
below. . .)

-

This would vary by NAND type, manufacturer, etc., and personally, I am
not aware of any concrete data on the subject. I have not seen anyone
do an experiment like many people did to test endurance. With that
said, there was a controversial article last year which was based on
some JEDEC/Intel data which showed that under some conditions SSDs
could lose data in as little as a week. Here's Anandtech's take on it:
The Truth About SSD Data Retention -- The basic takeaway from all of
that is that data retention periods will depend on SSD's operating
temperature and its storage temperature. If you manage to write your
data to an SSD that is running at 55C and then store it at 25C, you'd
be looking at 404 weeks of data retention for a client SSD.
 




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