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Why is it not letting me extend the partition?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 24th 21, 04:20 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
Yousuf Khan[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,296
Default Why is it not letting me extend the partition?

So one of my oldest SSD's just finally had a bad misfire. One of its
memory cells seems to have gone bad, and it happened to be my boot
drive, so I had to restore to a new SSD from backups. That took a fair
bit of time to restore, but the new drive is twice as large as the old
one, but it created a partition that is the same size as the original. I
expected that, but I also expected that I should be able to extend the
partition after the restore to fill the new drive's size. However going
into disk management it doesn't allow me to fill up that entire drive.
Any idea what's going on here?

Yousuf Khan
  #2  
Old March 24th 21, 04:48 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
John Doe[_9_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 410
Default Why is it not letting me extend the partition?

Yousuf Khan wrote:

So one of my oldest SSD's just finally had a bad misfire. One of its
memory cells seems to have gone bad, and it happened to be my boot
drive, so I had to restore to a new SSD from backups. That took a fair
bit of time to restore, but the new drive is twice as large as the old
one, but it created a partition that is the same size as the original. I
expected that, but I also expected that I should be able to extend the
partition after the restore to fill the new drive's size. However going
into disk management it doesn't allow me to fill up that entire drive.
Any idea what's going on here?


You mean Microsoft disk management? Use a real partitioning utility. I got a
free one several years ago downloaded from Amazon that works... Partition
Master Technician 13.0 Portable. See if it's still available. If you make
Windows backups (like everybody should), you don't even need to keep it on
your system, just don't re-install it after the next restore.

  #3  
Old March 24th 21, 05:25 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,453
Default Why is it not letting me extend the partition?

Yousuf Khan wrote:

So one of my oldest SSD's just finally had a bad misfire. One of its
memory cells seems to have gone bad, and it happened to be my boot
drive, so I had to restore to a new SSD from backups. That took a fair
bit of time to restore, but the new drive is twice as large as the old
one, but it created a partition that is the same size as the original. I
expected that, but I also expected that I should be able to extend the
partition after the restore to fill the new drive's size. However going
into disk management it doesn't allow me to fill up that entire drive.
Any idea what's going on here?

Yousuf Khan


There are a lot of partition manipulations that the Disk Manager in
Windows won't do. You need to use a 3rd party partition manager. There
are lots of free ones. I use Easeus Partition Master, but there are
lots of others.

You might want to investigate overprovisioning for SSDs. It prolongs
the lifespan of SSDs by giving them more room for remapping bad blocks.
SSDs are self-destructive: they have a maximum number of writes. They
will fail depending on the volume of writes you impinge on the SSD. The
SSD will likely come with a preset of 7% to 10% of its capacity to use
for overprovisioning. You can increase that. A tool might've come with
the drive, or be available from the SSD maker. However, a contiguous
span of unallocated space will increase the overprovisioning space, and
you can use a 3rd party partition manager for that, too. You could
expand the primary partition to occupy all of the unallocated space, or
you could enlarge it just shy of how much unallocated space you want to
leave to increase overprovisioning.
  #4  
Old March 24th 21, 07:14 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
Paul[_28_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,467
Default Why is it not letting me extend the partition?

Yousuf Khan wrote:
So one of my oldest SSD's just finally had a bad misfire. One of its
memory cells seems to have gone bad, and it happened to be my boot
drive, so I had to restore to a new SSD from backups. That took a fair
bit of time to restore, but the new drive is twice as large as the old
one, but it created a partition that is the same size as the original. I
expected that, but I also expected that I should be able to extend the
partition after the restore to fill the new drive's size. However going
into disk management it doesn't allow me to fill up that entire drive.
Any idea what's going on here?

Yousuf Khan


It's GPT and you need to find a utility that does a
better job of showing the partitions.

The Microsoft Reserved partition has no recognizable
file system inside, and the information I can find suggests
it is used as a space when something needs to be adjusted. It
is a tiny supply of "slack". But, it might also function as
a "blocker" when Disk Management is at work. And then, not
every utility lists it properly. Some utilities try to "hide"
things like this, and only show data partitions.

Try Linux GDisk or Linux GParted, and see if you can
spot the blocker there. The disktype utility might work,
but the only edition available there is the Cygwin one.

disktype.exe /dev/sda

--- /dev/sda
Block device, size 2.729 TiB (3000592982016 bytes)
DOS/MBR partition map
Partition 1: 2.000 TiB (2199023255040 bytes, 4294967295 sectors from 1)
Type 0xEE (EFI GPT protective)
GPT partition map, 128 entries
Disk size 2.729 TiB (3000592982016 bytes, 5860533168 sectors)
Disk GUID EE053214-E191-B343-A670-D3A712F353DB
Partition 1: 512 MiB (536870912 bytes, 1048576 sectors from 2048)
Type EFI System (FAT) (GUID 28732AC1-1FF8-D211-BA4B-00A0C93EC93B)
Partition Name "EFI System Partition"
Partition GUID 0CF3D241-6DA1-764C-AE0F-559E55314B8C
FAT32 file system (hints score 5 of 5)
Volume size 511.0 MiB (535805952 bytes, 130812 clusters of 4 KiB)
Partition 2: 20 GiB (21474836480 bytes, 41943040 sectors from 1050624)
Type Unknown (GUID AF3DC60F-8384-7247-8E79-3D69D8477DE4)
Partition Name "MINT193"
Partition GUID 0647492B-0C78-DC4E-914C-E210AB6FF5A5
Ext3 file system
Volume name "MINT193"
UUID E96B501E-23B5-4F80-A41C-CEE6A5E1D59C (DCE, v4)
Last mounted at "/media/bullwinkle/MINT193"
Volume size 20 GiB (21474836480 bytes, 5242880 blocks of 4 KiB)
Partition 3: 16 MiB (16777216 bytes, 32768 sectors from 123930624) === not visible,
Type MS Reserved (GUID 16E3C9E3-5C0B-B84D-817D-F92DF00215AE) diskmgmt.msc
Partition Name "Microsoft reserved partition"
Partition GUID 0C569E59-E917-AC40-B336-E7B2527D77AD
Blank disk/medium
Partition 4: 300.4 GiB (322502360576 bytes, 629887423 sectors from 123963392)
Type Basic Data (GUID A2A0D0EB-E5B9-3344-87C0-68B6B72699C7)
Partition Name "Basic data partition" === actually,
Partition GUID 65A1A4E6-4F11-7944-874A-B3A515F131DE "WIN10"
NTFS file system
Volume size 300.4 GiB (322502360064 bytes, 629887422 sectors)
Partition 5: 514 MiB (538968064 bytes, 1052672 sectors from 753854464)
Type Unknown (GUID A4BB94DE-D106-404D-A16A-BFD50179D6AC)
Partition Name ""
Partition GUID 99242951-459E-1144-BF88-61517A280CCA === recovery
NTFS file system partition
Volume size 514.0 MiB (538967552 bytes, 1052671 sectors)

HTH,
Paul


  #5  
Old March 24th 21, 09:01 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
Jeff Barnett
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Why is it not letting me extend the partition?

On 3/24/2021 12:14 AM, Paul wrote:
Yousuf Khan wrote:
So one of my oldest SSD's just finally had a bad misfire. One of its
memory cells seems to have gone bad, and it happened to be my boot
drive, so I had to restore to a new SSD from backups. That took a fair
bit of time to restore, but the new drive is twice as large as the old
one, but it created a partition that is the same size as the original.
I expected that, but I also expected that I should be able to extend
the partition after the restore to fill the new drive's size. However
going into disk management it doesn't allow me to fill up that entire
drive. Any idea what's going on here?

¬*¬*¬* Yousuf Khan


It's GPT and you need to find a utility that does a
better job of showing the partitions.

The Microsoft Reserved partition has no recognizable
file system inside, and the information I can find suggests
it is used as a space when something needs to be adjusted. It
is a tiny supply of "slack". But, it might also function as
a "blocker" when Disk Management is at work. And then, not
every utility lists it properly. Some utilities try to "hide"
things like this, and only show data partitions.

Try Linux GDisk or Linux GParted, and see if you can
spot the blocker there. The disktype utility might work,
but the only edition available there is the Cygwin one.

disktype.exe /dev/sda

--- /dev/sda
Block device, size 2.729 TiB (3000592982016 bytes)
DOS/MBR partition map
Partition 1: 2.000 TiB (2199023255040 bytes, 4294967295 sectors from 1)
¬* Type 0xEE (EFI GPT protective)
GPT partition map, 128 entries
¬* Disk size 2.729 TiB (3000592982016 bytes, 5860533168 sectors)
¬* Disk GUID EE053214-E191-B343-A670-D3A712F353DB
Partition 1: 512 MiB (536870912 bytes, 1048576 sectors from 2048)
¬* Type EFI System (FAT) (GUID 28732AC1-1FF8-D211-BA4B-00A0C93EC93B)
¬* Partition Name "EFI System Partition"
¬* Partition GUID 0CF3D241-6DA1-764C-AE0F-559E55314B8C
¬* FAT32 file system (hints score 5 of 5)
¬*¬*¬* Volume size 511.0 MiB (535805952 bytes, 130812 clusters of 4 KiB)
Partition 2: 20 GiB (21474836480 bytes, 41943040 sectors from 1050624)
¬* Type Unknown (GUID AF3DC60F-8384-7247-8E79-3D69D8477DE4)
¬* Partition Name "MINT193"
¬* Partition GUID 0647492B-0C78-DC4E-914C-E210AB6FF5A5
¬* Ext3 file system
¬*¬*¬* Volume name "MINT193"
¬*¬*¬* UUID E96B501E-23B5-4F80-A41C-CEE6A5E1D59C (DCE, v4)
¬*¬*¬* Last mounted at "/media/bullwinkle/MINT193"
¬*¬*¬* Volume size 20 GiB (21474836480 bytes, 5242880 blocks of 4 KiB)
Partition 3: 16 MiB (16777216 bytes, 32768 sectors from 123930624)
=== not visible,
¬* Type MS Reserved (GUID
16E3C9E3-5C0B-B84D-817D-F92DF00215AE)¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* diskmgmt.msc
¬* Partition Name "Microsoft reserved partition"
¬* Partition GUID 0C569E59-E917-AC40-B336-E7B2527D77AD
¬* Blank disk/medium
Partition 4: 300.4 GiB (322502360576 bytes, 629887423 sectors from
123963392)
¬* Type Basic Data (GUID A2A0D0EB-E5B9-3344-87C0-68B6B72699C7)
¬* Partition Name "Basic data partition"
=== actually,
¬* Partition GUID
65A1A4E6-4F11-7944-874A-B3A515F131DE¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬* "WIN10"
¬* NTFS file system
¬*¬*¬* Volume size 300.4 GiB (322502360064 bytes, 629887422 sectors)
Partition 5: 514 MiB (538968064 bytes, 1052672 sectors from 753854464)
¬* Type Unknown (GUID A4BB94DE-D106-404D-A16A-BFD50179D6AC)
¬* Partition Name ""
¬* Partition GUID 99242951-459E-1144-BF88-61517A280CCA
=== recovery
¬* NTFS file
system¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* partition
¬*¬*¬* Volume size 514.0 MiB (538967552 bytes, 1052671 sectors)

HTH,
¬*¬* Paul


There may be another issue. I'm thinking of Samsung over provisioning
(or is over something else?) where about 10% of disk free space is used
by the disk firmware to shuffle blocks in use in order to level wear. If
I wanted to change my SSD, I'd probably need to use the Samsung Magician
to first undo that block; then I could do my partition management; then
use Samsung again to enable the wear leveling. I presume that that more
than Samsung implements such a scheme.

This is not my area of expertise and I'm generalizing from my limited
experience using a few Samsung SSD on my systems. Perhaps someone more
knowledgeable can either poo poo my observation or, if it sounds right,
flesh out what is going on.
--
Jeff Barnett

  #6  
Old March 24th 21, 11:17 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 24
Default SSD "overprovisioning" (was: Why is it not letting me extend the partition?)

On Tue, 23 Mar 2021 at 23:25:49, VanguardLH wrote (my
responses usually follow points raised):
Yousuf Khan wrote:

[]
drive, so I had to restore to a new SSD from backups. That took a fair
bit of time to restore, but the new drive is twice as large as the old
one, but it created a partition that is the same size as the original. I
expected that, but I also expected that I should be able to extend the
partition after the restore to fill the new drive's size. However going
into disk management it doesn't allow me to fill up that entire drive.
Any idea what's going on here?

Yousuf Khan


There are a lot of partition manipulations that the Disk Manager in
Windows won't do. You need to use a 3rd party partition manager. There
are lots of free ones. I use Easeus Partition Master, but there are
lots of others.


(I use that one too. It was the first one I tried and does what I want,
so I haven't tried any others, so can't say if it's better or worse than
any. The UI is similar to the Windows one - but then maybe they all
are.)

You might want to investigate overprovisioning for SSDs. It prolongs
the lifespan of SSDs by giving them more room for remapping bad blocks.
SSDs are self-destructive: they have a maximum number of writes. They
will fail depending on the volume of writes you impinge on the SSD. The
SSD will likely come with a preset of 7% to 10% of its capacity to use
for overprovisioning. You can increase that. A tool might've come with
the drive, or be available from the SSD maker. However, a contiguous
span of unallocated space will increase the overprovisioning space, and
you can use a 3rd party partition manager for that, too. You could
expand the primary partition to occupy all of the unallocated space, or
you could enlarge it just shy of how much unallocated space you want to
leave to increase overprovisioning.


How does the firmware (or whatever) in the SSD _know_ how much space
you've left unallocated, if you use any partitioning utility other than
one from the SSD maker (which presumably has some way of "telling" the
firmware)?

If, after some while using an SSD, it has used up some of the slack,
because of some cells having been worn out, does the apparent total size
of the SSD - including unallocated space - appear (either in
manufacturer's own or some third-party partitioning utility) smaller
than when that utility is run on it when nearly new?

If - assuming you _can_ - you reduce the space for overprovisioning to
zero (obviously unwise), will the SSD "brick" either immediately, or
very shortly afterwards (i. e. as soon as another cell fails)?

If, once an SSD _has_ "bricked" [and is one of the ones that goes to
read-only rather than truly bricking], can you - obviously in a dock on
a different machine - change (increase) its overprovisioning allowance
and bring it back to life, at least temporarily?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"I'm tired of all this nonsense about beauty being only skin-deep. That's deep
enough. What do you want, an adorable pancreas?" - Jean Kerr
  #7  
Old March 24th 21, 11:39 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
Paul[_28_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,467
Default Why is it not letting me extend the partition?

Jeff Barnett wrote:
On 3/24/2021 12:14 AM, Paul wrote:
Yousuf Khan wrote:
So one of my oldest SSD's just finally had a bad misfire. One of its
memory cells seems to have gone bad, and it happened to be my boot
drive, so I had to restore to a new SSD from backups. That took a
fair bit of time to restore, but the new drive is twice as large as
the old one, but it created a partition that is the same size as the
original. I expected that, but I also expected that I should be able
to extend the partition after the restore to fill the new drive's
size. However going into disk management it doesn't allow me to fill
up that entire drive. Any idea what's going on here?

Yousuf Khan


It's GPT and you need to find a utility that does a
better job of showing the partitions.

The Microsoft Reserved partition has no recognizable
file system inside, and the information I can find suggests
it is used as a space when something needs to be adjusted. It
is a tiny supply of "slack". But, it might also function as
a "blocker" when Disk Management is at work. And then, not
every utility lists it properly. Some utilities try to "hide"
things like this, and only show data partitions.

Try Linux GDisk or Linux GParted, and see if you can
spot the blocker there. The disktype utility might work,
but the only edition available there is the Cygwin one.

disktype.exe /dev/sda

--- /dev/sda
Block device, size 2.729 TiB (3000592982016 bytes)
DOS/MBR partition map
Partition 1: 2.000 TiB (2199023255040 bytes, 4294967295 sectors from 1)
Type 0xEE (EFI GPT protective)
GPT partition map, 128 entries
Disk size 2.729 TiB (3000592982016 bytes, 5860533168 sectors)
Disk GUID EE053214-E191-B343-A670-D3A712F353DB
Partition 1: 512 MiB (536870912 bytes, 1048576 sectors from 2048)
Type EFI System (FAT) (GUID 28732AC1-1FF8-D211-BA4B-00A0C93EC93B)
Partition Name "EFI System Partition"
Partition GUID 0CF3D241-6DA1-764C-AE0F-559E55314B8C
FAT32 file system (hints score 5 of 5)
Volume size 511.0 MiB (535805952 bytes, 130812 clusters of 4 KiB)
Partition 2: 20 GiB (21474836480 bytes, 41943040 sectors from 1050624)
Type Unknown (GUID AF3DC60F-8384-7247-8E79-3D69D8477DE4)
Partition Name "MINT193"
Partition GUID 0647492B-0C78-DC4E-914C-E210AB6FF5A5
Ext3 file system
Volume name "MINT193"
UUID E96B501E-23B5-4F80-A41C-CEE6A5E1D59C (DCE, v4)
Last mounted at "/media/bullwinkle/MINT193"
Volume size 20 GiB (21474836480 bytes, 5242880 blocks of 4 KiB)
Partition 3: 16 MiB (16777216 bytes, 32768 sectors from 123930624)
=== not visible,
Type MS Reserved (GUID
16E3C9E3-5C0B-B84D-817D-F92DF00215AE) diskmgmt.msc
Partition Name "Microsoft reserved partition"
Partition GUID 0C569E59-E917-AC40-B336-E7B2527D77AD
Blank disk/medium
Partition 4: 300.4 GiB (322502360576 bytes, 629887423 sectors from
123963392)
Type Basic Data (GUID A2A0D0EB-E5B9-3344-87C0-68B6B72699C7)
Partition Name "Basic data partition"
=== actually,
Partition GUID
65A1A4E6-4F11-7944-874A-B3A515F131DE "WIN10"
NTFS file system
Volume size 300.4 GiB (322502360064 bytes, 629887422 sectors)
Partition 5: 514 MiB (538968064 bytes, 1052672 sectors from 753854464)
Type Unknown (GUID A4BB94DE-D106-404D-A16A-BFD50179D6AC)
Partition Name ""
Partition GUID 99242951-459E-1144-BF88-61517A280CCA
=== recovery
NTFS file
system partition
Volume size 514.0 MiB (538967552 bytes, 1052671 sectors)

HTH,
Paul


There may be another issue. I'm thinking of Samsung over provisioning
(or is over something else?) where about 10% of disk free space is used
by the disk firmware to shuffle blocks in use in order to level wear. If
I wanted to change my SSD, I'd probably need to use the Samsung Magician
to first undo that block; then I could do my partition management; then
use Samsung again to enable the wear leveling. I presume that that more
than Samsung implements such a scheme.

This is not my area of expertise and I'm generalizing from my limited
experience using a few Samsung SSD on my systems. Perhaps someone more
knowledgeable can either poo poo my observation or, if it sounds right,
flesh out what is going on.


Wear leveling is done in the virtual to physical translation
inside the drive. Sector 1 is not stored in offset 1 of the
flash. Your data is "sprayed" all over the place in there.
If you lose the virtual to physical map inside the SSD, the
data recovery specialist will not be able to "put the
blocks back in order".

The drive declares a capacity. It's a call in the ATA/ATAPI
protocol. The sizing was settled in a law suit long ago, which
penalized a company for attempting to lie about the capacity.
The capacity on a 1TB drive, will be some number of
cylinders larger than 1e12 bytes. The size is an odd number,
so some CHS habits of yore, continue to work. The size is not
actually a rounded number that customers would enjoy, it's
a number used to keep snotty softwares happy.

Any spares pool, and spares management for wear leveling,
is behind the scenes and does not influence drive operation.
The spares pool means the physical surface inside the drive,
is somewhat larger than the virtual presentation to the outside
world.

We can Secure Erase the drive. All this does, is remove
memory of what was there previously (Secure Erase being
suitable before selling on the drive).

We can TRIM a drive, and this is an opportunity for the
OS, to deliver a "hint" to the drive, as to what virtual
areas of the 1TB, are not actually in usage by the OS.
If you've removed the partition table from the drive,
then the OS during TRIM, could tell the drive that the
entire surface is unused, then all LBAs are put in the
spares, ready to be used on the next write(s). You might
be able to deliver this news from the ToolKit software,
if the GUI in the OS had no mechanism for it. (Maybe
you can do it from Diskpart, but I haven't checked.)

The SMART table gives information about Reallocations,
which are permanently spared out blocks. As the drive
gets older, the controller may mark portions of it as
unusable. But, because there is virtual to physical
translation, as long as there are sufficient blocks
to present a 1TB surface, we can't tell from the outside,
it's in trouble. However, if you have the ToolKit for
the drive installed, it can take a reading every day,
and extrapolate remaining life (using either the
number of writes to cells, or, using the reallocation
total to predict the drive is in trouble). A drive
can die before the warranty period is up, or before the
wear life has expired. SMART allows this to be tracked.

There is a "critical data" storage area, which may
receive a lot more writes than the average cell. Perhaps
it's constructed from SLC cells. If this is damaged, that
can lead to instant drive death, because the drive
has lost its spares table, its map of virtual to
physical and so on. Some drives may have sufficient wear
life, but a failure to record critical data, means they
poop out early. And maybe this isn't covered all that
well from a SMART perspective.

But generally, all corner cases ignored, you just use
SSDs in the same way you'd use an HDD. You don't need to
pamper them. The ToolKit will tell you if your pattern
is abusive, and with any luck, warn you before the drive
takes a dive. But like any device, you should have
backups for any eventuality. Regular hard drives can
die instantly, if the power (like +12V), rises above
+15V or so. So if someone tells me they have a 33TB array
and no backups, all I have to do is warn them that the
ATX PSU is a liability and could, if it chose to, ruin
the entire array (redundancy and all) in one fell swoop.

We had a server at work, providing licensed software to
500 engineers. One day, at 2PM in the afternoon, the
controller firmware in the RAID controller card, wrote
zeros across the array, down low. Wiping out some critical
structure for the file system. Instantly, 500 engineers
had no software. Most went home for the day :-) Paid of course.
Costing the company a lost-work fortune. While RAIDs are
nice and all, they do have some (rather unfortunate)
common mode failure modes.

A second RAID controller of the same model, did the same
thing to its RAID array. Nobody went home for that one,
and at least then they were thinking it was a firmware
bug in the RAID card.

Summary - No, the SSD has no excuses. It's either ready
for service, or its not. There are no in-between
states where a partition boundary cannot move.
The ToolKit software each brand provides, will
have rudimentary extrapolation of life-remaining.
As long as some life remains, you can move
partition boundaries or do anything else involving
writes.

Paul
  #8  
Old March 24th 21, 11:47 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
Chris Elvidge
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Why is it not letting me extend the partition?

On 24/03/2021 03:20 am, Yousuf Khan wrote:
So one of my oldest SSD's just finally had a bad misfire. One of its
memory cells seems to have gone bad, and it happened to be my boot
drive, so I had to restore to a new SSD from backups. That took a fair
bit of time to restore, but the new drive is twice as large as the old
one, but it created a partition that is the same size as the original. I
expected that, but I also expected that I should be able to extend the
partition after the restore to fill the new drive's size. However going
into disk management it doesn't allow me to fill up that entire drive.
Any idea what's going on here?

Yousuf Khan


Without a current layout diagram it's impossible to say what's wrong.
Is the free space into which you want to expand the partition contiguous
with the partition you want to expand? Is it the partition you wish to
expand the boot partition?
See he
https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/...b-2462a09bf629

--
Chris Elvidge
England
  #9  
Old March 24th 21, 01:24 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
Paul[_28_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,467
Default SSD "overprovisioning"

J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:


If, after some while using an SSD, it has used up some of the slack,
because of some cells having been worn out, does the apparent total size
of the SSD - including unallocated space - appear (either in
manufacturer's own or some third-party partitioning utility) smaller
than when that utility is run on it when nearly new?


The declared size of an SSD does not change.

The declared size of an HDD does not change.

What happens under the covers, is not on display.

The reason you cannot arbitrarily move the end of a drive,
is because some structures are up there, which don't appear
in diagrams. This too is a secret.

Any time something under the covers breaks, the
storage device will say "I cannot perform my function,
therefore I will brick". That is preferable to moving
the end of the drive and damaging the backup GPT partition,
the RAID metadata, or the Dynamic Disk declaration.

Paul
  #10  
Old March 24th 21, 01:43 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
Paul[_28_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,467
Default Why is it not letting me extend the partition?

Yousuf Khan wrote:
So one of my oldest SSD's just finally had a bad misfire. One of its
memory cells seems to have gone bad, and it happened to be my boot
drive, so I had to restore to a new SSD from backups. That took a fair
bit of time to restore, but the new drive is twice as large as the old
one, but it created a partition that is the same size as the original. I
expected that, but I also expected that I should be able to extend the
partition after the restore to fill the new drive's size. However going
into disk management it doesn't allow me to fill up that entire drive.
Any idea what's going on here?

Yousuf Khan


One thing you can try.

Boot from your Linux LiveDVD USB stick.

Attempt to mount the partitions on the disk. Then

cat /etc/mtab

Look at the mount points. Are any "ro" for
read-only, instead of "rw" for read-write ?
It's possible to mark a storage device as
read-only, but I've not been able to find
sufficient diagrams of the details. It may
be a flag located next to the VolumeID 32 bit
number in the MBR. The partition headers may
have a similar mechanism, but I got no hints at
all there.

https://linux.die.net/man/8/hdparm

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/hdparm...with-examples/

sudo hdparm -I /dev/sda # Dump info

sudo hdparm -r0 /dev/sda # set ReadOnly flag to zero, make drive ReadWrite.
# reboot recommended, as Ripley would say.

Diskpart in Windows likely has a similar function,
but we're not sure it works. The threads I could find
were not conclusive. Otherwise I would have done a Windows one for you.

In any case, the *boot* drive, should not be the
same drive you experiment with. On Windows, maybe
C: is on /dev/sda, whereas /dev/sdb is the "broken"
drive needing modification. And a reboot maybe.
No OS need behave well when it comes to corner conditions.
F5 (refresh) doesn't work at all levels.

Paul
 




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