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RAID1 on SATA drives



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 15th 07, 12:10 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Squat
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default RAID1 on SATA drives

Hello all,
I would like to clone a Seagate SATA drive to another drive (It's my boot
drive)
My new drive is a larger seagate SATA drive.
My PC has the abaility to create a RAID drive in the boot options (before
windows is running)


My goal is to create a RAID 1, then remove the original and run the new
drive and the primary drive in the PC.

My question is this.
Can a raid be established on different size drives? My new one is larger
than the first drive.
Thanks in advance.
Squat,


  #2  
Old July 15th 07, 03:58 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
peter
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 405
Default RAID1 on SATA drives

It is my understanding that in order to create a RAID array you wll need
drives of the same size..........maybe even from the same company.
peter
"Squat" wrote in message
...
Hello all,
I would like to clone a Seagate SATA drive to another drive (It's my boot
drive)
My new drive is a larger seagate SATA drive.
My PC has the abaility to create a RAID drive in the boot options (before
windows is running)


My goal is to create a RAID 1, then remove the original and run the new
drive and the primary drive in the PC.

My question is this.
Can a raid be established on different size drives? My new one is larger
than the first drive.
Thanks in advance.
Squat,


  #3  
Old July 15th 07, 05:13 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Bob Knowlden
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 128
Default RAID1 on SATA drives

I've never done it, but I have read that it is possible to use
different-sized disks to make an array. The result, however, will be the
same size as if all of the drives were the same as the SMALLEST one.

It might be more satisfactory to spend some more cash on a twin to your new
drive.


Return address scrambled. Replace nkbob with bobkn.

"Squat" wrote in message
...
Hello all,
I would like to clone a Seagate SATA drive to another drive (It's my boot
drive)
My new drive is a larger seagate SATA drive.
My PC has the abaility to create a RAID drive in the boot options (before
windows is running)


My goal is to create a RAID 1, then remove the original and run the new
drive and the primary drive in the PC.

My question is this.
Can a raid be established on different size drives? My new one is larger
than the first drive.
Thanks in advance.
Squat,


  #4  
Old July 15th 07, 08:20 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13,364
Default RAID1 on SATA drives

Bob Knowlden wrote:
I've never done it, but I have read that it is possible to use
different-sized disks to make an array. The result, however, will be the
same size as if all of the drives were the same as the SMALLEST one.

It might be more satisfactory to spend some more cash on a twin to your
new drive.


Return address scrambled. Replace nkbob with bobkn.


To give an example, if you tried RAID1, using a 40GB and a 320GB drive,
the resulting mirrored array has a capacity of 40GB, and 280GB on the
second drive is inaccessible. Given the low price of drives, buying two
new ones ro make a RAID1, makes more sense.

Paul


"Squat" wrote in message
...
Hello all,
I would like to clone a Seagate SATA drive to another drive (It's my
boot drive)
My new drive is a larger seagate SATA drive.
My PC has the abaility to create a RAID drive in the boot options
(before windows is running)


My goal is to create a RAID 1, then remove the original and run the
new drive and the primary drive in the PC.

My question is this.
Can a raid be established on different size drives? My new one is
larger than the first drive.
Thanks in advance.
Squat,


  #5  
Old July 16th 07, 01:09 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Squat
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default RAID1 on SATA drives


"Paul" wrote in message ...
Bob Knowlden wrote:
I've never done it, but I have read that it is possible to use
different-sized disks to make an array. The result, however, will be the
same size as if all of the drives were the same as the SMALLEST one.

It might be more satisfactory to spend some more cash on a twin to your
new drive.


Return address scrambled. Replace nkbob with bobkn.


To give an example, if you tried RAID1, using a 40GB and a 320GB drive,
the resulting mirrored array has a capacity of 40GB, and 280GB on the
second drive is inaccessible. Given the low price of drives, buying two
new ones ro make a RAID1, makes more sense.

Paul

Thanks, This might work if I can remove the smaller drive later and use it
as a recovered drive.
My main problem is that I can not copy all of drive A: (the smaller, older
drive) to the newer drive. (it's larger) Windows crashs while copying it and
so does the Seagate utility that came with the drive.
I was hoping the Raid function might work around it by copying everything to
the new drive as a back up and then installing the new drive in place of the
older drive.

Think it will work?
S


  #6  
Old July 16th 07, 01:52 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Timothy Drouillard[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 57
Default RAID1 on SATA drives

If all you want to do is move to a new larger hard drive, all you need is
something like Acronis TrueImage.

It'll allow you to clone your original HD to the larger one, resizing the
partitions as part of the process.


"Squat" wrote in message
...

"Paul" wrote in message ...
Bob Knowlden wrote:
I've never done it, but I have read that it is possible to use
different-sized disks to make an array. The result, however, will be the
same size as if all of the drives were the same as the SMALLEST one.

It might be more satisfactory to spend some more cash on a twin to your
new drive.


Return address scrambled. Replace nkbob with bobkn.


To give an example, if you tried RAID1, using a 40GB and a 320GB drive,
the resulting mirrored array has a capacity of 40GB, and 280GB on the
second drive is inaccessible. Given the low price of drives, buying two
new ones ro make a RAID1, makes more sense.

Paul

Thanks, This might work if I can remove the smaller drive later and use it
as a recovered drive.
My main problem is that I can not copy all of drive A: (the smaller, older
drive) to the newer drive. (it's larger) Windows crashs while copying it
and so does the Seagate utility that came with the drive.
I was hoping the Raid function might work around it by copying everything
to the new drive as a back up and then installing the new drive in place
of the older drive.

Think it will work?
S


 




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