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Me
October 19th 03, 06:33 PM
Sorry for the OT question, but I'm sure someone here can help.

I have a spare monitor that I want to put in my bedroom and connect a dvd
player or a video player or perhaps hook up the cable box to.

I know a cheap tv would do a better job, but assuming that that there is
such a thing, can I buy a "box" that would allow me to use the monitor and
amplified speakers for the above box without having to connect a pc?

Hope my questions make sense!

phobos
October 19th 03, 09:03 PM
Me wrote:
> Sorry for the OT question, but I'm sure someone here can help.
>
> I have a spare monitor that I want to put in my bedroom and connect a dvd
> player or a video player or perhaps hook up the cable box to.
>
> I know a cheap tv would do a better job, but assuming that that there is
> such a thing, can I buy a "box" that would allow me to use the monitor and
> amplified speakers for the above box without having to connect a pc?
>
> Hope my questions make sense!
>
>
>
>

You need an external scanline converter, also somtimes called a 'line
doubler'. These are the lowend devices often used to connect game
consoles to your VGA monitor. Redant makes them, and I'm sure there's a
bunch on Lik-Sang. But the key thing you'll need to find i ssomething
with S-Video, assuming your DVD player supports it.

The signal won't be nearly as clear as normal (since it's an
interpolated low res NTSC composite signal) and unless you spend a lot
of money these devices don't usually match the quality of a good TV with
component inputs. Never the less they can be handy for DVD's or a
Gamecube, etc.

Keep in mind that these won't actually increase the resolution of the
source. Your DVD player will still output at the NTSC standard of 525
lines converted (usually) to a 640x480 VGA signal. S-Video will be
cleaner, but you input will still be interlaced unless you find one that
uses component cables for progressive scan.

Lurkin Gumby
October 23rd 03, 02:49 AM
phobos > wrote in message

> Keep in mind that these won't actually increase the resolution of the
> source. Your DVD player will still output at the NTSC standard of 525
> lines converted (usually) to a 640x480 VGA signal. S-Video will be
> cleaner, but you input will still be interlaced unless you find one that
> uses component cables for progressive scan.

Forgive me for adding to an "OT thread", but I'm puzzled by the above.
Could someone please explain "progressive scan" as it relates to DVD
players and computer monitors? I've heard of progressive scan DVD
players; how is the output from these supposed to be better in light
of what's written above about NTSC displays? How is S-video cleaner?

The reason that I ask is that I've got a 17" LCD monitor that I've
been thinking about hooking up to a DVD player using an NTSC/PAL to
VGA converter (I've seen a few different models advertised by various
online retailers). My 1280x1024 LCD monitor has an RGB operating
frequency of 28-80 kHz horizontal and 48-75 Hz vertical, but it only
has a standard RGB input connector. Does the above suggest that there
are different/better kinds of converters than NTSC to VGA that might
be more appropriate for use with a monitor like mine?

Thanks in advance for the help!

Kevin

phobos
October 23rd 03, 04:37 AM
Lurkin Gumby wrote:
> phobos > wrote in message
>
>
>>Keep in mind that these won't actually increase the resolution of the
>>source. Your DVD player will still output at the NTSC standard of 525
>>lines converted (usually) to a 640x480 VGA signal. S-Video will be
>>cleaner, but you input will still be interlaced unless you find one that
>>uses component cables for progressive scan.
>
>
> Forgive me for adding to an "OT thread", but I'm puzzled by the above.
> Could someone please explain "progressive scan" as it relates to DVD
> players and computer monitors? I've heard of progressive scan DVD
> players; how is the output from these supposed to be better in light
> of what's written above about NTSC displays? How is S-video cleaner?
>
> The reason that I ask is that I've got a 17" LCD monitor that I've
> been thinking about hooking up to a DVD player using an NTSC/PAL to
> VGA converter (I've seen a few different models advertised by various
> online retailers). My 1280x1024 LCD monitor has an RGB operating
> frequency of 28-80 kHz horizontal and 48-75 Hz vertical, but it only
> has a standard RGB input connector. Does the above suggest that there
> are different/better kinds of converters than NTSC to VGA that might
> be more appropriate for use with a monitor like mine?
>
> Thanks in advance for the help!
>
> Kevin

To put it simply, a computer monitor is progressive by nature, it draws
one complete line across at a time (top to bottom) till it completes a
full frame (picture), then jumps to the top and does it all over again.

The number of times it redraws is the refresh rate (60hz = 60 draws per
second).

Now interlaced is what TV is. It has these partial pictures called
"fields" that are basically half a picture each of alternating lines.
It draws 1 set of lines (odd), then another (even). It's basically the
same as drawing two half pictures in the same time frame, but slightly
apart (30/1.001 of a second I think).

So due to the persistence of vision, your eyes see 60-ish "frames" per
second, but they're interlaced.

Your DVD software takes that interlaced DVD material and then converts
it to progressive through a process called ITVC (inverse telecine) to
get the clean 24p (24 full progressive frames per second).

A VGA converter is also known as a scanline converter, it is different;
it still shows a interlaced signal, but just upscaled to your monitor's
default VGA resolution (640x480 in most cases).

In order to get true progressive frames you need any of the following
setups:

1. HDTV with a progressive DVD player using component input.
2. PC with DVD drive.
3. Monitor with high end scanline converter and appropriate input
(YCbCr component or true RGB in).

Progressive DVD players will convert material into 24p, but if you're
still using an interlaced signal (like composite, s-video, or even RF)
then the signal is still interlaced.