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July 4th 03, 04:50 PM
The Constitution of the United States:

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union,
establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common
defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to
ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for
the United States of America.


Article. I.

Section. 1.

All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the
United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.

Section. 2.

The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every
second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each
State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most
numerous Branch of the State Legislature.

No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age
of twenty five Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States,
and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which he
shall be chosen.

Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several
States which may be included within this Union, according to their
respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole Number
of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and
excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons. The actual
Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the
Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten
Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number of
Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each
State shall have at Least one Representative; and until such enumeration
shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to chuse three,
Massachusetts eight, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations one,
Connecticut five, New-York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight,
Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South
Carolina five, and Georgia three.

When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive
Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies.

The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Officers;
and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment.

Section. 3.

The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each
State, chosen by the Legislature thereof for six Years; and each Senator
shall have one Vote.

Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the first
Election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three Classes. The
Seats of the Senators of the first Class shall be vacated at the Expiration
of the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth
Year, and of the third Class at the Expiration of the sixth Year, so that
one third may be chosen every second Year; and if Vacancies happen by
Resignation, or otherwise, during the Recess of the Legislature of any
State, the Executive thereof may make temporary Appointments until the next
Meeting of the Legislature, which shall then fill such Vacancies.

No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of
thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who
shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall
be chosen.

The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate,
but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided.

The Senate shall chuse their other Officers, and also a President pro
tempore, in the Absence of the Vice President, or when he shall exercise the
Office of President of the United States.

The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting
for that Purpose, they shall be on Oath or Affirmation. When the President
of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no
Person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the
Members present.

Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal
from Office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any Office of honor,
Trust or Profit under the United States: but the Party convicted shall
nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and
Punishment, according to Law.

Section. 4.

The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and
Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature
thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such
Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.

The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such Meeting
shall be on the first Monday in December, unless they shall by Law appoint a
different Day.

Section. 5.

Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Qualifications
of its own Members, and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do
Business; but a smaller Number may adjourn from day to day, and may be
authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such Manner, and
under such Penalties as each House may provide.

Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members
for disorderly Behaviour, and, with the Concurrence of two thirds, expel a
Member.

Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to time
publish the same, excepting such Parts as may in their Judgment require
Secrecy; and the Yeas and Nays of the Members of either House on any
question shall, at the Desire of one fifth of those Present, be entered on
the Journal.

Neither House, during the Session of Congress, shall, without the Consent of
the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other Place than
that in which the two Houses shall be sitting.

Section. 6.

The Senators and Representatives shall receive a Compensation for their
Services, to be ascertained by Law, and paid out of the Treasury of the
United States. They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of
the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the Session
of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and
for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in
any other Place.

No Senator or Representative shall, during the Time for which he was
elected, be appointed to any civil Office under the Authority of the United
States, which shall have been created, or the Emoluments whereof shall have
been encreased during such time; and no Person holding any Office under the
United States, shall be a Member of either House during his Continuance in
Office.

Section. 7.

All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of
Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as on
other Bills.

Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the
Senate, shall, before it become a Law, be presented to the President of the
United States: If he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall return
it, with his Objections to that House in which it shall have originated, who
shall enter the Objections at large on their Journal, and proceed to
reconsider it.If after such Reconsideration two thirds of that House shall
agree to pass the Bill, it shall be sent, together with the Objections, to
the other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved
by two thirds of that House, it shall become a Law. But in all such Cases
the Votes of both Houses shall be determined by yeas and Nays, and the Names
of the Persons voting for and against the Bill shall be entered on the
Journal of each House respectively. If any Bill shall not be returned by the
President within ten Days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been
presented to him, the Same shall be a Law, in like Manner as if he had
signed it, unless the Congress by their Adjournment prevent its Return, in
which Case it shall not be a Law.

Every Order, Resolution, or Vote to which the Concurrence of the Senate and
House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a question of
Adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States; and
before the Same shall take Effect, shall be approved by him, or being
disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two thirds of the Senate and House
of Representatives, according to the Rules and Limitations prescribed in the
Case of a Bill.

Section. 8.

The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and
Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general
Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be
uniform throughout the United States;

To borrow Money on the credit of the United States;

To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and
with the Indian Tribes;

To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the
subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States;

To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix the
Standard of Weights and Measures;

To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securities and current
Coin of the United States;

To establish Post Offices and post Roads;

To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited
Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective
Writings and Discoveries;

To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;

To define and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas, and
Offences against the Law of Nations;

To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules
concerning Captures on Land and Water;

To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall
be for a longer Term than two Years;

To provide and maintain a Navy;

To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval
Forces;

To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union,
suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions;

To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the Militia, and for
governing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the United
States, reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the
Officers, and the Authority of training the Militia according to the
discipline prescribed by Congress;

To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such
District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of particular
States, and the Acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government of
the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places purchased
by the Consent of the Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be,
for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-Yards, and other
needful Buildings;--And

To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into
Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this
Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or
Officer thereof.

Section. 9.

The Migration or Importation of such Persons as any of the States now
existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the
Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a Tax
or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars for
each Person.

The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless
when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it.

No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed.

No Capitation, or other direct, Tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to
the Census or enumeration herein before directed to be taken.

No Tax or Duty shall be laid on Articles exported from any State.

No Preference shall be given by any Regulation of Commerce or Revenue to the
Ports of one State over those of another; nor shall Vessels bound to, or
from, one State, be obliged to enter, clear, or pay Duties in another.

No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of
Appropriations made by Law; and a regular Statement and Account of the
Receipts and Expenditures of all public Money shall be published from time
to time.

No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person
holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent
of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any
kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.

Section. 10.

No State shall enter into any Treaty, Alliance, or Confederation; grant
Letters of Marque and Reprisal; coin Money; emit Bills of Credit; make any
Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts; pass any Bill
of Attainder, ex post facto Law, or Law impairing the Obligation of
Contracts, or grant any Title of Nobility.

No State shall, without the Consent of the Congress, lay any Imposts or
Duties on Imports or Exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for
executing it's inspection Laws: and the net Produce of all Duties and
Imposts, laid by any State on Imports or Exports, shall be for the Use of
the Treasury of the United States; and all such Laws shall be subject to the
Revision and Controul of the Congress.

No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any Duty of Tonnage,
keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement or
Compact with another State, or with a foreign Power, or engage in War,
unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of
delay.


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Article. II.

Section. 1.

The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of
America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years, and,
together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected, as
follows:

Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may
direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and
Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no
Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit
under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.

The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by Ballot for
two Persons, of whom one at least shall not be an Inhabitant of the same
State with themselves. And they shall make a List of all the Persons voted
for, and of the Number of Votes for each; which List they shall sign and
certify, and transmit sealed to the Seat of the Government of the United
States, directed to the President of the Senate. The President of the Senate
shall, in the Presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all
the Certificates, and the Votes shall then be counted. The Person having the
greatest Number of Votes shall be the President, if such Number be a
Majority of the whole Number of Electors appointed; and if there be more
than one who have such Majority, and have an equal Number of Votes, then the
House of Representatives shall immediately chuse by Ballot one of them for
President; and if no Person have a Majority, then from the five highest on
the List the said House shall in like Manner chuse the President. But in
chusing the President, the Votes shall be taken by States, the
Representation from each State having one Vote; A quorum for this purpose
shall consist of a Member or Members from two thirds of the States, and a
Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice. In every Case,
after the Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number of
Votes of the Electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should
remain two or more who have equal Votes, the Senate shall chuse from them by
Ballot the Vice President.

The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day on
which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout
the United States.

No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States,
at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the
Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office who
shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen
Years a Resident within the United States.

In Case of the Removal of the President from Office, or of his Death,
Resignation, or Inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the said
Office, the Same shall devolve on the Vice President, and the Congress may
by Law provide for the Case of Removal, Death, Resignation or Inability,
both of the President and Vice President, declaring what Officer shall then
act as President, and such Officer shall act accordingly, until the
Disability be removed, or a President shall be elected.

The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a
Compensation, which shall neither be increased nor diminished during the
Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive within
that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or any of them.

Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the following
Oath or Affirmation:--"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will
faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to
the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the
United States."

Section. 2.

The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United
States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the
actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing,
of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any
Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall
have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offences against the United
States, except in Cases of Impeachment.

He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to
make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he
shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall
appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the
supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose
Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be
established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such
inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the
Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.

The President shall have Power to fill up all Vacancies that may happen
during the Recess of the Senate, by granting Commissions which shall expire
at the End of their next Session.

Section. 3.

He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of
the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall
judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary Occasions, convene
both Houses, or either of them, and in Case of Disagreement between them,
with Respect to the Time of Adjournment, he may adjourn them to such Time as
he shall think proper; he shall receive Ambassadors and other public
Ministers; he shall take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed, and
shall Commission all the Officers of the United States.

Section. 4.

The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States,
shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason,
Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.


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Article III.

Section. 1.

The judicial Power of the United States shall be vested in one supreme
Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time
ordain and establish. The Judges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts,
shall hold their Offices during good Behaviour, and shall, at stated Times,
receive for their Services a Compensation, which shall not be diminished
during their Continuance in Office.

Section. 2.

The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising
under this Constitution, the Laws of the United States, and Treaties made,
or which shall be made, under their Authority;--to all Cases affecting
Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls;--to all Cases of admiralty
and maritime Jurisdiction;--to Controversies to which the United States
shall be a Party;--to Controversies between two or more States;-- between a
State and Citizens of another State;--between Citizens of different
States;--between Citizens of the same State claiming Lands under Grants of
different States, and between a State, or the Citizens thereof, and foreign
States, Citizens or Subjects.

In all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, and
those in which a State shall be Party, the supreme Court shall have original
Jurisdiction. In all the other Cases before mentioned, the supreme Court
shall have appellate Jurisdiction, both as to Law and Fact, with such
Exceptions, and under such Regulations as the Congress shall make.

The Trial of all Crimes, except in Cases of Impeachment, shall be by Jury;
and such Trial shall be held in the State where the said Crimes shall have
been committed; but when not committed within any State, the Trial shall be
at such Place or Places as the Congress may by Law have directed.

Section. 3.

Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against
them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No
Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two
Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court.

The Congress shall have Power to declare the Punishment of Treason, but no
Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except
during the Life of the Person attainted.


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Article. IV.

Section. 1.

Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts,
Records, and judicial Proceedings of every other State. And the Congress may
by general Laws prescribe the Manner in which such Acts, Records and
Proceedings shall be proved, and the Effect thereof.

Section. 2.

The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and
Immunities of Citizens in the several States.

A Person charged in any State with Treason, Felony, or other Crime, who
shall flee from Justice, and be found in another State, shall on Demand of
the executive Authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up, to
be removed to the State having Jurisdiction of the Crime.

No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof,
escaping into another, shall, in Consequence of any Law or Regulation
therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, but shall be delivered
up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labour may be due.

Section. 3.

New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new State
shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor
any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or Parts of
States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as
well as of the Congress.

The Congress shall have Power to dispose of and make all needful Rules and
Regulations respecting the Territory or other Property belonging to the
United States; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed as to
Prejudice any Claims of the United States, or of any particular State.

Section. 4.

The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican
Form of Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion; and on
Application of the Legislature, or of the Executive (when the Legislature
cannot be convened), against domestic Violence.


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Article. V.

The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary,
shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of the
Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention
for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all
Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when ratified by the
Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in
three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be
proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made prior
to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner affect
the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article; and
that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal Suffrage
in the Senate.


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Article. VI.

All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption of
this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this
Constitution, as under the Confederation.

This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in
Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the
Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and
the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the
Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.

The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the
several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of
the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or
Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall ever
be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the
United States.


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Article. VII.

The Ratification of the Conventions of nine States, shall be sufficient for
the Establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the
Same.

The Word, "the," being interlined between the seventh and eighth Lines of
the first Page, the Word "Thirty" being partly written on an Erazure in the
fifteenth Line of the first Page, The Words "is tried" being interlined
between the thirty second and thirty third Lines of the first Page and the
Word "the" being interlined between the forty third and forty fourth Lines
of the second Page.

Attest William Jackson Secretary

Done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States present the
Seventeenth Day of September in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven
hundred and Eighty seven and of the Independence of the United States of
America the Twelfth In witness whereof We have hereunto subscribed our
Names,

G°. Washington
Presidt and deputy from Virginia

Delaware
Geo: Read
Gunning Bedford jun
John Dickinson
Richard Bassett
Jaco: Broom

Maryland
James McHenry
Dan of St Thos. Jenifer
Danl. Carroll

Virginia
John Blair
James Madison Jr.

North Carolina
Wm. Blount
Richd. Dobbs Spaight
Hu Williamson

South Carolina
J. Rutledge
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
Charles Pinckney
Pierce Butler

Georgia
William Few
Abr Baldwin

New Hampshire
John Langdon
Nicholas Gilman

Massachusetts
Nathaniel Gorham
Rufus King

Connecticut
Wm. Saml. Johnson
Roger Sherman

New York
Alexander Hamilton

New Jersey
Wil: Livingston
David Brearley
Wm. Paterson
Jona: Dayton

Pennsylvania
B Franklin
Thomas Mifflin
Robt. Morris
Geo. Clymer
Thos. FitzSimons
Jared Ingersoll
James Wilson
Gouv Morris

neopolaris
July 4th 03, 05:36 PM
I love living in the most powerful country in the world. Commie crunching,
frog smashing, kraut killing...

I just can't get enough!!!
"SST" > wrote in message
t...
> The Constitution of the United States:
>
> We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union,
> establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common
> defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty
to
> ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for
> the United States of America.
>
>
> Article. I.
>
> Section. 1.
>
> All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the
> United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of
Representatives.
>
> Section. 2.
>
> The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every
> second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each
> State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most
> numerous Branch of the State Legislature.
>
> No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age
> of twenty five Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States,
> and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which
he
> shall be chosen.
>
> Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several
> States which may be included within this Union, according to their
> respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole
Number
> of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and
> excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons. The actual
> Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of
the
> Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten
> Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number of
> Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each
> State shall have at Least one Representative; and until such enumeration
> shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to chuse
three,
> Massachusetts eight, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations one,
> Connecticut five, New-York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight,
> Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South
> Carolina five, and Georgia three.
>
> When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive
> Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies.
>
> The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Officers;
> and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment.
>
> Section. 3.
>
> The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from
each
> State, chosen by the Legislature thereof for six Years; and each Senator
> shall have one Vote.
>
> Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the first
> Election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three Classes.
The
> Seats of the Senators of the first Class shall be vacated at the
Expiration
> of the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth
> Year, and of the third Class at the Expiration of the sixth Year, so that
> one third may be chosen every second Year; and if Vacancies happen by
> Resignation, or otherwise, during the Recess of the Legislature of any
> State, the Executive thereof may make temporary Appointments until the
next
> Meeting of the Legislature, which shall then fill such Vacancies.
>
> No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of
> thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who
> shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall
> be chosen.
>
> The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate,
> but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided.
>
> The Senate shall chuse their other Officers, and also a President pro
> tempore, in the Absence of the Vice President, or when he shall exercise
the
> Office of President of the United States.
>
> The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting
> for that Purpose, they shall be on Oath or Affirmation. When the President
> of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no
> Person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the
> Members present.
>
> Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal
> from Office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any Office of honor,
> Trust or Profit under the United States: but the Party convicted shall
> nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and
> Punishment, according to Law.
>
> Section. 4.
>
> The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and
> Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature
> thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such
> Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.
>
> The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such Meeting
> shall be on the first Monday in December, unless they shall by Law appoint
a
> different Day.
>
> Section. 5.
>
> Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Qualifications
> of its own Members, and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do
> Business; but a smaller Number may adjourn from day to day, and may be
> authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such Manner, and
> under such Penalties as each House may provide.
>
> Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members
> for disorderly Behaviour, and, with the Concurrence of two thirds, expel a
> Member.
>
> Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to time
> publish the same, excepting such Parts as may in their Judgment require
> Secrecy; and the Yeas and Nays of the Members of either House on any
> question shall, at the Desire of one fifth of those Present, be entered on
> the Journal.
>
> Neither House, during the Session of Congress, shall, without the Consent
of
> the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other Place than
> that in which the two Houses shall be sitting.
>
> Section. 6.
>
> The Senators and Representatives shall receive a Compensation for their
> Services, to be ascertained by Law, and paid out of the Treasury of the
> United States. They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach
of
> the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the
Session
> of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same;
and
> for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in
> any other Place.
>
> No Senator or Representative shall, during the Time for which he was
> elected, be appointed to any civil Office under the Authority of the
United
> States, which shall have been created, or the Emoluments whereof shall
have
> been encreased during such time; and no Person holding any Office under
the
> United States, shall be a Member of either House during his Continuance in
> Office.
>
> Section. 7.
>
> All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of
> Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as
on
> other Bills.
>
> Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the
> Senate, shall, before it become a Law, be presented to the President of
the
> United States: If he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall return
> it, with his Objections to that House in which it shall have originated,
who
> shall enter the Objections at large on their Journal, and proceed to
> reconsider it.If after such Reconsideration two thirds of that House shall
> agree to pass the Bill, it shall be sent, together with the Objections, to
> the other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if
approved
> by two thirds of that House, it shall become a Law. But in all such Cases
> the Votes of both Houses shall be determined by yeas and Nays, and the
Names
> of the Persons voting for and against the Bill shall be entered on the
> Journal of each House respectively. If any Bill shall not be returned by
the
> President within ten Days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been
> presented to him, the Same shall be a Law, in like Manner as if he had
> signed it, unless the Congress by their Adjournment prevent its Return, in
> which Case it shall not be a Law.
>
> Every Order, Resolution, or Vote to which the Concurrence of the Senate
and
> House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a question of
> Adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States; and
> before the Same shall take Effect, shall be approved by him, or being
> disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two thirds of the Senate and
House
> of Representatives, according to the Rules and Limitations prescribed in
the
> Case of a Bill.
>
> Section. 8.
>
> The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts
and
> Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general
> Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be
> uniform throughout the United States;
>
> To borrow Money on the credit of the United States;
>
> To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States,
and
> with the Indian Tribes;
>
> To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the
> subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States;
>
> To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix
the
> Standard of Weights and Measures;
>
> To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securities and current
> Coin of the United States;
>
> To establish Post Offices and post Roads;
>
> To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for
limited
> Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective
> Writings and Discoveries;
>
> To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;
>
> To define and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas, and
> Offences against the Law of Nations;
>
> To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules
> concerning Captures on Land and Water;
>
> To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use
shall
> be for a longer Term than two Years;
>
> To provide and maintain a Navy;
>
> To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval
> Forces;
>
> To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union,
> suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions;
>
> To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the Militia, and for
> governing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the
United
> States, reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the
> Officers, and the Authority of training the Militia according to the
> discipline prescribed by Congress;
>
> To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such
> District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of particular
> States, and the Acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government
of
> the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places
purchased
> by the Consent of the Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be,
> for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-Yards, and other
> needful Buildings;--And
>
> To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into
> Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this
> Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department
or
> Officer thereof.
>
> Section. 9.
>
> The Migration or Importation of such Persons as any of the States now
> existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the
> Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a Tax
> or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars for
> each Person.
>
> The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless
> when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it.
>
> No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed.
>
> No Capitation, or other direct, Tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to
> the Census or enumeration herein before directed to be taken.
>
> No Tax or Duty shall be laid on Articles exported from any State.
>
> No Preference shall be given by any Regulation of Commerce or Revenue to
the
> Ports of one State over those of another; nor shall Vessels bound to, or
> from, one State, be obliged to enter, clear, or pay Duties in another.
>
> No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of
> Appropriations made by Law; and a regular Statement and Account of the
> Receipts and Expenditures of all public Money shall be published from time
> to time.
>
> No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person
> holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the
Consent
> of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of
any
> kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.
>
> Section. 10.
>
> No State shall enter into any Treaty, Alliance, or Confederation; grant
> Letters of Marque and Reprisal; coin Money; emit Bills of Credit; make any
> Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts; pass any Bill
> of Attainder, ex post facto Law, or Law impairing the Obligation of
> Contracts, or grant any Title of Nobility.
>
> No State shall, without the Consent of the Congress, lay any Imposts or
> Duties on Imports or Exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for
> executing it's inspection Laws: and the net Produce of all Duties and
> Imposts, laid by any State on Imports or Exports, shall be for the Use of
> the Treasury of the United States; and all such Laws shall be subject to
the
> Revision and Controul of the Congress.
>
> No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any Duty of Tonnage,
> keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement or
> Compact with another State, or with a foreign Power, or engage in War,
> unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of
> delay.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> ----
>
> Article. II.
>
> Section. 1.
>
> The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of
> America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years, and,
> together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected, as
> follows:
>
> Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may
> direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and
> Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no
> Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit
> under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.
>
> The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by Ballot for
> two Persons, of whom one at least shall not be an Inhabitant of the same
> State with themselves. And they shall make a List of all the Persons voted
> for, and of the Number of Votes for each; which List they shall sign and
> certify, and transmit sealed to the Seat of the Government of the United
> States, directed to the President of the Senate. The President of the
Senate
> shall, in the Presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open
all
> the Certificates, and the Votes shall then be counted. The Person having
the
> greatest Number of Votes shall be the President, if such Number be a
> Majority of the whole Number of Electors appointed; and if there be more
> than one who have such Majority, and have an equal Number of Votes, then
the
> House of Representatives shall immediately chuse by Ballot one of them for
> President; and if no Person have a Majority, then from the five highest on
> the List the said House shall in like Manner chuse the President. But in
> chusing the President, the Votes shall be taken by States, the
> Representation from each State having one Vote; A quorum for this purpose
> shall consist of a Member or Members from two thirds of the States, and a
> Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice. In every Case,
> after the Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number
of
> Votes of the Electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should
> remain two or more who have equal Votes, the Senate shall chuse from them
by
> Ballot the Vice President.
>
> The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day
on
> which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout
> the United States.
>
> No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United
States,
> at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the
> Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office
who
> shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen
> Years a Resident within the United States.
>
> In Case of the Removal of the President from Office, or of his Death,
> Resignation, or Inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the said
> Office, the Same shall devolve on the Vice President, and the Congress may
> by Law provide for the Case of Removal, Death, Resignation or Inability,
> both of the President and Vice President, declaring what Officer shall
then
> act as President, and such Officer shall act accordingly, until the
> Disability be removed, or a President shall be elected.
>
> The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a
> Compensation, which shall neither be increased nor diminished during the
> Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive
within
> that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or any of them.
>
> Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the
following
> Oath or Affirmation:--"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will
> faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will
to
> the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of
the
> United States."
>
> Section. 2.
>
> The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the
United
> States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the
> actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in
writing,
> of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any
> Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall
> have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offences against the United
> States, except in Cases of Impeachment.
>
> He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to
> make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he
> shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate,
shall
> appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the
> supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose
> Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be
> established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of
such
> inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the
> Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.
>
> The President shall have Power to fill up all Vacancies that may happen
> during the Recess of the Senate, by granting Commissions which shall
expire
> at the End of their next Session.
>
> Section. 3.
>
> He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State
of
> the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall
> judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary Occasions, convene
> both Houses, or either of them, and in Case of Disagreement between them,
> with Respect to the Time of Adjournment, he may adjourn them to such Time
as
> he shall think proper; he shall receive Ambassadors and other public
> Ministers; he shall take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed, and
> shall Commission all the Officers of the United States.
>
> Section. 4.
>
> The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States,
> shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of,
Treason,
> Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> ----
>
> Article III.
>
> Section. 1.
>
> The judicial Power of the United States shall be vested in one supreme
> Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time
> ordain and establish. The Judges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts,
> shall hold their Offices during good Behaviour, and shall, at stated
Times,
> receive for their Services a Compensation, which shall not be diminished
> during their Continuance in Office.
>
> Section. 2.
>
> The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising
> under this Constitution, the Laws of the United States, and Treaties made,
> or which shall be made, under their Authority;--to all Cases affecting
> Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls;--to all Cases of
admiralty
> and maritime Jurisdiction;--to Controversies to which the United States
> shall be a Party;--to Controversies between two or more States;-- between
a
> State and Citizens of another State;--between Citizens of different
> States;--between Citizens of the same State claiming Lands under Grants of
> different States, and between a State, or the Citizens thereof, and
foreign
> States, Citizens or Subjects.
>
> In all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls,
and
> those in which a State shall be Party, the supreme Court shall have
original
> Jurisdiction. In all the other Cases before mentioned, the supreme Court
> shall have appellate Jurisdiction, both as to Law and Fact, with such
> Exceptions, and under such Regulations as the Congress shall make.
>
> The Trial of all Crimes, except in Cases of Impeachment, shall be by Jury;
> and such Trial shall be held in the State where the said Crimes shall have
> been committed; but when not committed within any State, the Trial shall
be
> at such Place or Places as the Congress may by Law have directed.
>
> Section. 3.
>
> Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War
against
> them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No
> Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two
> Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court.
>
> The Congress shall have Power to declare the Punishment of Treason, but no
> Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except
> during the Life of the Person attainted.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> ----
>
> Article. IV.
>
> Section. 1.
>
> Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts,
> Records, and judicial Proceedings of every other State. And the Congress
may
> by general Laws prescribe the Manner in which such Acts, Records and
> Proceedings shall be proved, and the Effect thereof.
>
> Section. 2.
>
> The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and
> Immunities of Citizens in the several States.
>
> A Person charged in any State with Treason, Felony, or other Crime, who
> shall flee from Justice, and be found in another State, shall on Demand of
> the executive Authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up,
to
> be removed to the State having Jurisdiction of the Crime.
>
> No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof,
> escaping into another, shall, in Consequence of any Law or Regulation
> therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, but shall be delivered
> up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labour may be due.
>
> Section. 3.
>
> New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new
State
> shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor
> any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or Parts of
> States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as
> well as of the Congress.
>
> The Congress shall have Power to dispose of and make all needful Rules and
> Regulations respecting the Territory or other Property belonging to the
> United States; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed as
to
> Prejudice any Claims of the United States, or of any particular State.
>
> Section. 4.
>
> The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a
Republican
> Form of Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion; and
on
> Application of the Legislature, or of the Executive (when the Legislature
> cannot be convened), against domestic Violence.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> ----
>
> Article. V.
>
> The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary,
> shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of
the
> Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention
> for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all
> Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when ratified by the
> Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in
> three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be
> proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made
prior
> to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner
affect
> the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article;
and
> that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal
Suffrage
> in the Senate.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> ----
>
> Article. VI.
>
> All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption of
> this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this
> Constitution, as under the Confederation.
>
> This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made
in
> Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under
the
> Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and
> the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the
> Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.
>
> The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the
> several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both
of
> the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or
> Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall
ever
> be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the
> United States.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> ----
>
> Article. VII.
>
> The Ratification of the Conventions of nine States, shall be sufficient
for
> the Establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the
> Same.
>
> The Word, "the," being interlined between the seventh and eighth Lines of
> the first Page, the Word "Thirty" being partly written on an Erazure in
the
> fifteenth Line of the first Page, The Words "is tried" being interlined
> between the thirty second and thirty third Lines of the first Page and the
> Word "the" being interlined between the forty third and forty fourth Lines
> of the second Page.
>
> Attest William Jackson Secretary
>
> Done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States present the
> Seventeenth Day of September in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven
> hundred and Eighty seven and of the Independence of the United States of
> America the Twelfth In witness whereof We have hereunto subscribed our
> Names,
>
> G°. Washington
> Presidt and deputy from Virginia
>
> Delaware
> Geo: Read
> Gunning Bedford jun
> John Dickinson
> Richard Bassett
> Jaco: Broom
>
> Maryland
> James McHenry
> Dan of St Thos. Jenifer
> Danl. Carroll
>
> Virginia
> John Blair
> James Madison Jr.
>
> North Carolina
> Wm. Blount
> Richd. Dobbs Spaight
> Hu Williamson
>
> South Carolina
> J. Rutledge
> Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
> Charles Pinckney
> Pierce Butler
>
> Georgia
> William Few
> Abr Baldwin
>
> New Hampshire
> John Langdon
> Nicholas Gilman
>
> Massachusetts
> Nathaniel Gorham
> Rufus King
>
> Connecticut
> Wm. Saml. Johnson
> Roger Sherman
>
> New York
> Alexander Hamilton
>
> New Jersey
> Wil: Livingston
> David Brearley
> Wm. Paterson
> Jona: Dayton
>
> Pennsylvania
> B Franklin
> Thomas Mifflin
> Robt. Morris
> Geo. Clymer
> Thos. FitzSimons
> Jared Ingersoll
> James Wilson
> Gouv Morris
>
>
>

bongdaddyboo
July 4th 03, 06:35 PM
SST wrote:

> The Constitution of the United States:

<Irrelevant message snipped>

Please stop cross-posting this tosh. Nobody wants it and it's got sod all
to do with any of the groups you've crossposted to.

Besides, the AUP & T&Cs of your ISP expressly forbid you to "Cross-post the
same or substantially similar message excessively" so you've just earned
yourself an abuse report sir!
--
take a hit dude,
bongdaddyboo

janh
July 4th 03, 07:44 PM
YEAH BABY! I'm With YA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
"neopolaris" <.> wrote in message ...
> I love living in the most powerful country in the world. Commie crunching,
> frog smashing, kraut killing...
>
> I just can't get enough!!!
> "SST" > wrote in message
> t...
> > The Constitution of the United States:
> >
> > We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union,
> > establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common
> > defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty
> to
> > ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for
> > the United States of America.
> >
> >
> > Article. I.
> >
> > Section. 1.
> >
> > All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the
> > United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of
> Representatives.
> >
> > Section. 2.
> >
> > The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every
> > second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each
> > State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most
> > numerous Branch of the State Legislature.
> >
> > No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age
> > of twenty five Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States,
> > and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which
> he
> > shall be chosen.
> >
> > Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several
> > States which may be included within this Union, according to their
> > respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole
> Number
> > of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and
> > excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons. The actual
> > Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of
> the
> > Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten
> > Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number of
> > Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each
> > State shall have at Least one Representative; and until such enumeration
> > shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to chuse
> three,
> > Massachusetts eight, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations one,
> > Connecticut five, New-York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight,
> > Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South
> > Carolina five, and Georgia three.
> >
> > When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive
> > Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies.
> >
> > The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Officers;
> > and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment.
> >
> > Section. 3.
> >
> > The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from
> each
> > State, chosen by the Legislature thereof for six Years; and each Senator
> > shall have one Vote.
> >
> > Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the first
> > Election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three Classes.
> The
> > Seats of the Senators of the first Class shall be vacated at the
> Expiration
> > of the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth
> > Year, and of the third Class at the Expiration of the sixth Year, so that
> > one third may be chosen every second Year; and if Vacancies happen by
> > Resignation, or otherwise, during the Recess of the Legislature of any
> > State, the Executive thereof may make temporary Appointments until the
> next
> > Meeting of the Legislature, which shall then fill such Vacancies.
> >
> > No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of
> > thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who
> > shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall
> > be chosen.
> >
> > The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate,
> > but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided.
> >
> > The Senate shall chuse their other Officers, and also a President pro
> > tempore, in the Absence of the Vice President, or when he shall exercise
> the
> > Office of President of the United States.
> >
> > The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting
> > for that Purpose, they shall be on Oath or Affirmation. When the President
> > of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no
> > Person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the
> > Members present.
> >
> > Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal
> > from Office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any Office of honor,
> > Trust or Profit under the United States: but the Party convicted shall
> > nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and
> > Punishment, according to Law.
> >
> > Section. 4.
> >
> > The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and
> > Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature
> > thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such
> > Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.
> >
> > The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such Meeting
> > shall be on the first Monday in December, unless they shall by Law appoint
> a
> > different Day.
> >
> > Section. 5.
> >
> > Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Qualifications
> > of its own Members, and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do
> > Business; but a smaller Number may adjourn from day to day, and may be
> > authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such Manner, and
> > under such Penalties as each House may provide.
> >
> > Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members
> > for disorderly Behaviour, and, with the Concurrence of two thirds, expel a
> > Member.
> >
> > Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to time
> > publish the same, excepting such Parts as may in their Judgment require
> > Secrecy; and the Yeas and Nays of the Members of either House on any
> > question shall, at the Desire of one fifth of those Present, be entered on
> > the Journal.
> >
> > Neither House, during the Session of Congress, shall, without the Consent
> of
> > the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other Place than
> > that in which the two Houses shall be sitting.
> >
> > Section. 6.
> >
> > The Senators and Representatives shall receive a Compensation for their
> > Services, to be ascertained by Law, and paid out of the Treasury of the
> > United States. They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach
> of
> > the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the
> Session
> > of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same;
> and
> > for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in
> > any other Place.
> >
> > No Senator or Representative shall, during the Time for which he was
> > elected, be appointed to any civil Office under the Authority of the
> United
> > States, which shall have been created, or the Emoluments whereof shall
> have
> > been encreased during such time; and no Person holding any Office under
> the
> > United States, shall be a Member of either House during his Continuance in
> > Office.
> >
> > Section. 7.
> >
> > All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of
> > Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as
> on
> > other Bills.
> >
> > Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the
> > Senate, shall, before it become a Law, be presented to the President of
> the
> > United States: If he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall return
> > it, with his Objections to that House in which it shall have originated,
> who
> > shall enter the Objections at large on their Journal, and proceed to
> > reconsider it.If after such Reconsideration two thirds of that House shall
> > agree to pass the Bill, it shall be sent, together with the Objections, to
> > the other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if
> approved
> > by two thirds of that House, it shall become a Law. But in all such Cases
> > the Votes of both Houses shall be determined by yeas and Nays, and the
> Names
> > of the Persons voting for and against the Bill shall be entered on the
> > Journal of each House respectively. If any Bill shall not be returned by
> the
> > President within ten Days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been
> > presented to him, the Same shall be a Law, in like Manner as if he had
> > signed it, unless the Congress by their Adjournment prevent its Return, in
> > which Case it shall not be a Law.
> >
> > Every Order, Resolution, or Vote to which the Concurrence of the Senate
> and
> > House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a question of
> > Adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States; and
> > before the Same shall take Effect, shall be approved by him, or being
> > disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two thirds of the Senate and
> House
> > of Representatives, according to the Rules and Limitations prescribed in
> the
> > Case of a Bill.
> >
> > Section. 8.
> >
> > The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts
> and
> > Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general
> > Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be
> > uniform throughout the United States;
> >
> > To borrow Money on the credit of the United States;
> >
> > To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States,
> and
> > with the Indian Tribes;
> >
> > To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the
> > subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States;
> >
> > To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix
> the
> > Standard of Weights and Measures;
> >
> > To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securities and current
> > Coin of the United States;
> >
> > To establish Post Offices and post Roads;
> >
> > To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for
> limited
> > Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective
> > Writings and Discoveries;
> >
> > To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;
> >
> > To define and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas, and
> > Offences against the Law of Nations;
> >
> > To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules
> > concerning Captures on Land and Water;
> >
> > To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use
> shall
> > be for a longer Term than two Years;
> >
> > To provide and maintain a Navy;
> >
> > To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval
> > Forces;
> >
> > To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union,
> > suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions;
> >
> > To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the Militia, and for
> > governing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the
> United
> > States, reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the
> > Officers, and the Authority of training the Militia according to the
> > discipline prescribed by Congress;
> >
> > To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such
> > District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of particular
> > States, and the Acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government
> of
> > the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places
> purchased
> > by the Consent of the Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be,
> > for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-Yards, and other
> > needful Buildings;--And
> >
> > To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into
> > Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this
> > Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department
> or
> > Officer thereof.
> >
> > Section. 9.
> >
> > The Migration or Importation of such Persons as any of the States now
> > existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the
> > Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a Tax
> > or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars for
> > each Person.
> >
> > The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless
> > when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it.
> >
> > No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed.
> >
> > No Capitation, or other direct, Tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to
> > the Census or enumeration herein before directed to be taken.
> >
> > No Tax or Duty shall be laid on Articles exported from any State.
> >
> > No Preference shall be given by any Regulation of Commerce or Revenue to
> the
> > Ports of one State over those of another; nor shall Vessels bound to, or
> > from, one State, be obliged to enter, clear, or pay Duties in another.
> >
> > No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of
> > Appropriations made by Law; and a regular Statement and Account of the
> > Receipts and Expenditures of all public Money shall be published from time
> > to time.
> >
> > No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person
> > holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the
> Consent
> > of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of
> any
> > kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.
> >
> > Section. 10.
> >
> > No State shall enter into any Treaty, Alliance, or Confederation; grant
> > Letters of Marque and Reprisal; coin Money; emit Bills of Credit; make any
> > Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts; pass any Bill
> > of Attainder, ex post facto Law, or Law impairing the Obligation of
> > Contracts, or grant any Title of Nobility.
> >
> > No State shall, without the Consent of the Congress, lay any Imposts or
> > Duties on Imports or Exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for
> > executing it's inspection Laws: and the net Produce of all Duties and
> > Imposts, laid by any State on Imports or Exports, shall be for the Use of
> > the Treasury of the United States; and all such Laws shall be subject to
> the
> > Revision and Controul of the Congress.
> >
> > No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any Duty of Tonnage,
> > keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement or
> > Compact with another State, or with a foreign Power, or engage in War,
> > unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of
> > delay.
> >
> >
> > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
> > ----
> >
> > Article. II.
> >
> > Section. 1.
> >
> > The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of
> > America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years, and,
> > together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected, as
> > follows:
> >
> > Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may
> > direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and
> > Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no
> > Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit
> > under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.
> >
> > The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by Ballot for
> > two Persons, of whom one at least shall not be an Inhabitant of the same
> > State with themselves. And they shall make a List of all the Persons voted
> > for, and of the Number of Votes for each; which List they shall sign and
> > certify, and transmit sealed to the Seat of the Government of the United
> > States, directed to the President of the Senate. The President of the
> Senate
> > shall, in the Presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open
> all
> > the Certificates, and the Votes shall then be counted. The Person having
> the
> > greatest Number of Votes shall be the President, if such Number be a
> > Majority of the whole Number of Electors appointed; and if there be more
> > than one who have such Majority, and have an equal Number of Votes, then
> the
> > House of Representatives shall immediately chuse by Ballot one of them for
> > President; and if no Person have a Majority, then from the five highest on
> > the List the said House shall in like Manner chuse the President. But in
> > chusing the President, the Votes shall be taken by States, the
> > Representation from each State having one Vote; A quorum for this purpose
> > shall consist of a Member or Members from two thirds of the States, and a
> > Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice. In every Case,
> > after the Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number
> of
> > Votes of the Electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should
> > remain two or more who have equal Votes, the Senate shall chuse from them
> by
> > Ballot the Vice President.
> >
> > The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day
> on
> > which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout
> > the United States.
> >
> > No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United
> States,
> > at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the
> > Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office
> who
> > shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen
> > Years a Resident within the United States.
> >
> > In Case of the Removal of the President from Office, or of his Death,
> > Resignation, or Inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the said
> > Office, the Same shall devolve on the Vice President, and the Congress may
> > by Law provide for the Case of Removal, Death, Resignation or Inability,
> > both of the President and Vice President, declaring what Officer shall
> then
> > act as President, and such Officer shall act accordingly, until the
> > Disability be removed, or a President shall be elected.
> >
> > The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a
> > Compensation, which shall neither be increased nor diminished during the
> > Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive
> within
> > that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or any of them.
> >
> > Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the
> following
> > Oath or Affirmation:--"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will
> > faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will
> to
> > the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of
> the
> > United States."
> >
> > Section. 2.
> >
> > The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the
> United
> > States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the
> > actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in
> writing,
> > of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any
> > Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall
> > have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offences against the United
> > States, except in Cases of Impeachment.
> >
> > He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to
> > make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he
> > shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate,
> shall
> > appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the
> > supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose
> > Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be
> > established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of
> such
> > inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the
> > Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.
> >
> > The President shall have Power to fill up all Vacancies that may happen
> > during the Recess of the Senate, by granting Commissions which shall
> expire
> > at the End of their next Session.
> >
> > Section. 3.
> >
> > He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State
> of
> > the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall
> > judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary Occasions, convene
> > both Houses, or either of them, and in Case of Disagreement between them,
> > with Respect to the Time of Adjournment, he may adjourn them to such Time
> as
> > he shall think proper; he shall receive Ambassadors and other public
> > Ministers; he shall take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed, and
> > shall Commission all the Officers of the United States.
> >
> > Section. 4.
> >
> > The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States,
> > shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of,
> Treason,
> > Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.
> >
> >
> > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
> > ----
> >
> > Article III.
> >
> > Section. 1.
> >
> > The judicial Power of the United States shall be vested in one supreme
> > Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time
> > ordain and establish. The Judges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts,
> > shall hold their Offices during good Behaviour, and shall, at stated
> Times,
> > receive for their Services a Compensation, which shall not be diminished
> > during their Continuance in Office.
> >
> > Section. 2.
> >
> > The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising
> > under this Constitution, the Laws of the United States, and Treaties made,
> > or which shall be made, under their Authority;--to all Cases affecting
> > Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls;--to all Cases of
> admiralty
> > and maritime Jurisdiction;--to Controversies to which the United States
> > shall be a Party;--to Controversies between two or more States;-- between
> a
> > State and Citizens of another State;--between Citizens of different
> > States;--between Citizens of the same State claiming Lands under Grants of
> > different States, and between a State, or the Citizens thereof, and
> foreign
> > States, Citizens or Subjects.
> >
> > In all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls,
> and
> > those in which a State shall be Party, the supreme Court shall have
> original
> > Jurisdiction. In all the other Cases before mentioned, the supreme Court
> > shall have appellate Jurisdiction, both as to Law and Fact, with such
> > Exceptions, and under such Regulations as the Congress shall make.
> >
> > The Trial of all Crimes, except in Cases of Impeachment, shall be by Jury;
> > and such Trial shall be held in the State where the said Crimes shall have
> > been committed; but when not committed within any State, the Trial shall
> be
> > at such Place or Places as the Congress may by Law have directed.
> >
> > Section. 3.
> >
> > Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War
> against
> > them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No
> > Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two
> > Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court.
> >
> > The Congress shall have Power to declare the Punishment of Treason, but no
> > Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except
> > during the Life of the Person attainted.
> >
> >
> > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
> > ----
> >
> > Article. IV.
> >
> > Section. 1.
> >
> > Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts,
> > Records, and judicial Proceedings of every other State. And the Congress
> may
> > by general Laws prescribe the Manner in which such Acts, Records and
> > Proceedings shall be proved, and the Effect thereof.
> >
> > Section. 2.
> >
> > The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and
> > Immunities of Citizens in the several States.
> >
> > A Person charged in any State with Treason, Felony, or other Crime, who
> > shall flee from Justice, and be found in another State, shall on Demand of
> > the executive Authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up,
> to
> > be removed to the State having Jurisdiction of the Crime.
> >
> > No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof,
> > escaping into another, shall, in Consequence of any Law or Regulation
> > therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, but shall be delivered
> > up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labour may be due.
> >
> > Section. 3.
> >
> > New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new
> State
> > shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor
> > any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or Parts of
> > States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as
> > well as of the Congress.
> >
> > The Congress shall have Power to dispose of and make all needful Rules and
> > Regulations respecting the Territory or other Property belonging to the
> > United States; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed as
> to
> > Prejudice any Claims of the United States, or of any particular State.
> >
> > Section. 4.
> >
> > The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a
> Republican
> > Form of Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion; and
> on
> > Application of the Legislature, or of the Executive (when the Legislature
> > cannot be convened), against domestic Violence.
> >
> >
> > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
> > ----
> >
> > Article. V.
> >
> > The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary,
> > shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of
> the
> > Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention
> > for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all
> > Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when ratified by the
> > Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in
> > three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be
> > proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made
> prior
> > to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner
> affect
> > the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article;
> and
> > that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal
> Suffrage
> > in the Senate.
> >
> >
> > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
> > ----
> >
> > Article. VI.
> >
> > All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption of
> > this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this
> > Constitution, as under the Confederation.
> >
> > This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made
> in
> > Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under
> the
> > Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and
> > the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the
> > Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.
> >
> > The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the
> > several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both
> of
> > the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or
> > Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall
> ever
> > be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the
> > United States.
> >
> >
> > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
> > ----
> >
> > Article. VII.
> >
> > The Ratification of the Conventions of nine States, shall be sufficient
> for
> > the Establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the
> > Same.
> >
> > The Word, "the," being interlined between the seventh and eighth Lines of
> > the first Page, the Word "Thirty" being partly written on an Erazure in
> the
> > fifteenth Line of the first Page, The Words "is tried" being interlined
> > between the thirty second and thirty third Lines of the first Page and the
> > Word "the" being interlined between the forty third and forty fourth Lines
> > of the second Page.
> >
> > Attest William Jackson Secretary
> >
> > Done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States present the
> > Seventeenth Day of September in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven
> > hundred and Eighty seven and of the Independence of the United States of
> > America the Twelfth In witness whereof We have hereunto subscribed our
> > Names,
> >
> > G°. Washington
> > Presidt and deputy from Virginia
> >
> > Delaware
> > Geo: Read
> > Gunning Bedford jun
> > John Dickinson
> > Richard Bassett
> > Jaco: Broom
> >
> > Maryland
> > James McHenry
> > Dan of St Thos. Jenifer
> > Danl. Carroll
> >
> > Virginia
> > John Blair
> > James Madison Jr.
> >
> > North Carolina
> > Wm. Blount
> > Richd. Dobbs Spaight
> > Hu Williamson
> >
> > South Carolina
> > J. Rutledge
> > Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
> > Charles Pinckney
> > Pierce Butler
> >
> > Georgia
> > William Few
> > Abr Baldwin
> >
> > New Hampshire
> > John Langdon
> > Nicholas Gilman
> >
> > Massachusetts
> > Nathaniel Gorham
> > Rufus King
> >
> > Connecticut
> > Wm. Saml. Johnson
> > Roger Sherman
> >
> > New York
> > Alexander Hamilton
> >
> > New Jersey
> > Wil: Livingston
> > David Brearley
> > Wm. Paterson
> > Jona: Dayton
> >
> > Pennsylvania
> > B Franklin
> > Thomas Mifflin
> > Robt. Morris
> > Geo. Clymer
> > Thos. FitzSimons
> > Jared Ingersoll
> > James Wilson
> > Gouv Morris
> >
> >
> >
>
>

SST
July 4th 03, 08:50 PM
Eat me you f**ng ass! who the hell do you think you are, some sort of
net-cop.

F**k off and die. I've been reading your dribble, you're stupid and boring.

Report me all you want, I could care less. There is little anyone can do, or
wants too except for you.



"bongdaddyboo" > wrote in message
...
> SST wrote:
>
> > The Constitution of the United States:
>
> <Irrelevant message snipped>
>
> Please stop cross-posting this tosh. Nobody wants it and it's got sod all
> to do with any of the groups you've crossposted to.
>
> Besides, the AUP & T&Cs of your ISP expressly forbid you to "Cross-post
the
> same or substantially similar message excessively" so you've just earned
> yourself an abuse report sir!
> --
> take a hit dude,
> bongdaddyboo
>
>

Quixote
July 4th 03, 09:17 PM
"SST" > wrote in message
t...
> Eat me you f**ng ass! who the hell do you think you are, some sort of
> net-cop.
>
> F**k off and die. I've been reading your dribble, you're stupid and
boring.
>
> Report me all you want, I could care less. There is little anyone can do,
or
> wants too except for you.
>

What a stalwart representation of Justice, Tranquility, Welfare, and
Liberty.

Quixote

SST
July 4th 03, 09:26 PM
LOL, what a looser you must be!

'...verbal and physical threats...' what a fagot!


go smoke another bone and kill what few brain cells you have left.




"bongdaddyboo" > wrote in message
...
> SST wrote:
> > Eat me you f**ng ass! who the hell do you think you are, some sort of
> > net-cop.
>
> No, I'm just someone who likes to see on-topic messages. If I were a
> net-cop I'd take you to task about top-posting....
>
> > F**k off and die. I've been reading your dribble, you're stupid and
> > boring.
>
> No thanks, I'll stay very much alive.
>
> > Report me all you want, I could care less. There is little anyone can
> > do, or wants too except for you.
>
> Well you can now add verbal and physical threats to your catalogue of
> stupidity. There's another abuse report filed.
> --
> take a hit dude,
> bongdaddyboo
>
>

SST
July 4th 03, 09:27 PM
LOL - what?


"LockheartXP" > wrote in message
e...
> Go **** up your flagpole .........
>
>
> "SST" > a écrit dans le message de
> t...
> > Eat me you f**ng ass! who the hell do you think you are, some sort of
> > net-cop.
> >
> > F**k off and die. I've been reading your dribble, you're stupid and
> boring.
> >
> > Report me all you want, I could care less. There is little anyone can
do,
> or
> > wants too except for you.
> >
> >
> >
> > "bongdaddyboo" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > SST wrote:
> > >
> > > > The Constitution of the United States:
> > >
> > > <Irrelevant message snipped>
> > >
> > > Please stop cross-posting this tosh. Nobody wants it and it's got sod
> all
> > > to do with any of the groups you've crossposted to.
> > >
> > > Besides, the AUP & T&Cs of your ISP expressly forbid you to
"Cross-post
> > the
> > > same or substantially similar message excessively" so you've just
earned
> > > yourself an abuse report sir!
> > > --
> > > take a hit dude,
> > > bongdaddyboo
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>

Bob Nielsen
July 4th 03, 09:39 PM
AMEN! - Although, you have to admit, Shatner's "You play ball, we'll cut you
in for a piece o' the pie...you don't, you're out...ALL THE WAY OUT, y'know
what I mean?" is CLASSIC!!

Bob
"The Posting One" > wrote in message
t...
> I'm from the US, but I find it funny when people laugh at the Star Trek
> concept of a nation who bases their laws and doctrines on an old gangster
> pulp fiction novel. (TOS: A Piece of the Action).
>
> "SST" > wrote in message
> t...
> > The Constitution of the United States:
> >
> > We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect
Union,
> > establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common
> > defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of
Liberty
> to
> > ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution
for
> > the United States of America.
> >
> >
> > Article. I.
> >
> > Section. 1.
> >
> > All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of
the
> > United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of
> Representatives.
> >
> > Section. 2.
> >
> > The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every
> > second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in
each
> > State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most
> > numerous Branch of the State Legislature.
> >
> > No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the
Age
> > of twenty five Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United
States,
> > and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which
> he
> > shall be chosen.
> >
> > Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several
> > States which may be included within this Union, according to their
> > respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole
> Number
> > of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years,
and
> > excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons. The
actual
> > Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of
> the
> > Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten
> > Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number of
> > Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each
> > State shall have at Least one Representative; and until such enumeration
> > shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to chuse
> three,
> > Massachusetts eight, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations one,
> > Connecticut five, New-York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight,
> > Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South
> > Carolina five, and Georgia three.
> >
> > When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the
Executive
> > Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies.
> >
> > The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other
Officers;
> > and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment.
> >
> > Section. 3.
> >
> > The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from
> each
> > State, chosen by the Legislature thereof for six Years; and each Senator
> > shall have one Vote.
> >
> > Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the first
> > Election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three Classes.
> The
> > Seats of the Senators of the first Class shall be vacated at the
> Expiration
> > of the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth
> > Year, and of the third Class at the Expiration of the sixth Year, so
that
> > one third may be chosen every second Year; and if Vacancies happen by
> > Resignation, or otherwise, during the Recess of the Legislature of any
> > State, the Executive thereof may make temporary Appointments until the
> next
> > Meeting of the Legislature, which shall then fill such Vacancies.
> >
> > No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of
> > thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and
who
> > shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he
shall
> > be chosen.
> >
> > The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the
Senate,
> > but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided.
> >
> > The Senate shall chuse their other Officers, and also a President pro
> > tempore, in the Absence of the Vice President, or when he shall exercise
> the
> > Office of President of the United States.
> >
> > The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. When
sitting
> > for that Purpose, they shall be on Oath or Affirmation. When the
President
> > of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no
> > Person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the
> > Members present.
> >
> > Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to
removal
> > from Office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any Office of honor,
> > Trust or Profit under the United States: but the Party convicted shall
> > nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and
> > Punishment, according to Law.
> >
> > Section. 4.
> >
> > The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and
> > Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature
> > thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such
> > Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.
> >
> > The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such
Meeting
> > shall be on the first Monday in December, unless they shall by Law
appoint
> a
> > different Day.
> >
> > Section. 5.
> >
> > Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and
Qualifications
> > of its own Members, and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to
do
> > Business; but a smaller Number may adjourn from day to day, and may be
> > authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such Manner,
and
> > under such Penalties as each House may provide.
> >
> > Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its
Members
> > for disorderly Behaviour, and, with the Concurrence of two thirds, expel
a
> > Member.
> >
> > Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to
time
> > publish the same, excepting such Parts as may in their Judgment require
> > Secrecy; and the Yeas and Nays of the Members of either House on any
> > question shall, at the Desire of one fifth of those Present, be entered
on
> > the Journal.
> >
> > Neither House, during the Session of Congress, shall, without the
Consent
> of
> > the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other Place than
> > that in which the two Houses shall be sitting.
> >
> > Section. 6.
> >
> > The Senators and Representatives shall receive a Compensation for their
> > Services, to be ascertained by Law, and paid out of the Treasury of the
> > United States. They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and
Breach
> of
> > the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the
> Session
> > of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same;
> and
> > for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned
in
> > any other Place.
> >
> > No Senator or Representative shall, during the Time for which he was
> > elected, be appointed to any civil Office under the Authority of the
> United
> > States, which shall have been created, or the Emoluments whereof shall
> have
> > been encreased during such time; and no Person holding any Office under
> the
> > United States, shall be a Member of either House during his Continuance
in
> > Office.
> >
> > Section. 7.
> >
> > All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of
> > Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as
> on
> > other Bills.
> >
> > Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the
> > Senate, shall, before it become a Law, be presented to the President of
> the
> > United States: If he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall
return
> > it, with his Objections to that House in which it shall have originated,
> who
> > shall enter the Objections at large on their Journal, and proceed to
> > reconsider it.If after such Reconsideration two thirds of that House
shall
> > agree to pass the Bill, it shall be sent, together with the Objections,
to
> > the other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if
> approved
> > by two thirds of that House, it shall become a Law. But in all such
Cases
> > the Votes of both Houses shall be determined by yeas and Nays, and the
> Names
> > of the Persons voting for and against the Bill shall be entered on the
> > Journal of each House respectively. If any Bill shall not be returned by
> the
> > President within ten Days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been
> > presented to him, the Same shall be a Law, in like Manner as if he had
> > signed it, unless the Congress by their Adjournment prevent its Return,
in
> > which Case it shall not be a Law.
> >
> > Every Order, Resolution, or Vote to which the Concurrence of the Senate
> and
> > House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a question of
> > Adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States;
and
> > before the Same shall take Effect, shall be approved by him, or being
> > disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two thirds of the Senate and
> House
> > of Representatives, according to the Rules and Limitations prescribed in
> the
> > Case of a Bill.
> >
> > Section. 8.
> >
> > The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts
> and
> > Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general
> > Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall
be
> > uniform throughout the United States;
> >
> > To borrow Money on the credit of the United States;
> >
> > To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States,
> and
> > with the Indian Tribes;
> >
> > To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the
> > subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States;
> >
> > To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix
> the
> > Standard of Weights and Measures;
> >
> > To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securities and
current
> > Coin of the United States;
> >
> > To establish Post Offices and post Roads;
> >
> > To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for
> limited
> > Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective
> > Writings and Discoveries;
> >
> > To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;
> >
> > To define and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas,
and
> > Offences against the Law of Nations;
> >
> > To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules
> > concerning Captures on Land and Water;
> >
> > To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use
> shall
> > be for a longer Term than two Years;
> >
> > To provide and maintain a Navy;
> >
> > To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval
> > Forces;
> >
> > To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the
Union,
> > suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions;
> >
> > To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the Militia, and
for
> > governing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the
> United
> > States, reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the
> > Officers, and the Authority of training the Militia according to the
> > discipline prescribed by Congress;
> >
> > To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such
> > District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of
particular
> > States, and the Acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the
Government
> of
> > the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places
> purchased
> > by the Consent of the Legislature of the State in which the Same shall
be,
> > for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-Yards, and other
> > needful Buildings;--And
> >
> > To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into
> > Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this
> > Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any
Department
> or
> > Officer thereof.
> >
> > Section. 9.
> >
> > The Migration or Importation of such Persons as any of the States now
> > existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the
> > Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a
Tax
> > or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars
for
> > each Person.
> >
> > The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended,
unless
> > when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it.
> >
> > No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed.
> >
> > No Capitation, or other direct, Tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion
to
> > the Census or enumeration herein before directed to be taken.
> >
> > No Tax or Duty shall be laid on Articles exported from any State.
> >
> > No Preference shall be given by any Regulation of Commerce or Revenue to
> the
> > Ports of one State over those of another; nor shall Vessels bound to, or
> > from, one State, be obliged to enter, clear, or pay Duties in another.
> >
> > No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of
> > Appropriations made by Law; and a regular Statement and Account of the
> > Receipts and Expenditures of all public Money shall be published from
time
> > to time.
> >
> > No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no
Person
> > holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the
> Consent
> > of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of
> any
> > kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.
> >
> > Section. 10.
> >
> > No State shall enter into any Treaty, Alliance, or Confederation; grant
> > Letters of Marque and Reprisal; coin Money; emit Bills of Credit; make
any
> > Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts; pass any
Bill
> > of Attainder, ex post facto Law, or Law impairing the Obligation of
> > Contracts, or grant any Title of Nobility.
> >
> > No State shall, without the Consent of the Congress, lay any Imposts or
> > Duties on Imports or Exports, except what may be absolutely necessary
for
> > executing it's inspection Laws: and the net Produce of all Duties and
> > Imposts, laid by any State on Imports or Exports, shall be for the Use
of
> > the Treasury of the United States; and all such Laws shall be subject to
> the
> > Revision and Controul of the Congress.
> >
> > No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any Duty of
Tonnage,
> > keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement
or
> > Compact with another State, or with a foreign Power, or engage in War,
> > unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of
> > delay.
> >
> >
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
> > ----
> >
> > Article. II.
> >
> > Section. 1.
> >
> > The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States
of
> > America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years, and,
> > together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected,
as
> > follows:
> >
> > Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may
> > direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and
> > Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but
no
> > Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or
Profit
> > under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.
> >
> > The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by Ballot
for
> > two Persons, of whom one at least shall not be an Inhabitant of the same
> > State with themselves. And they shall make a List of all the Persons
voted
> > for, and of the Number of Votes for each; which List they shall sign and
> > certify, and transmit sealed to the Seat of the Government of the United
> > States, directed to the President of the Senate. The President of the
> Senate
> > shall, in the Presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open
> all
> > the Certificates, and the Votes shall then be counted. The Person having
> the
> > greatest Number of Votes shall be the President, if such Number be a
> > Majority of the whole Number of Electors appointed; and if there be more
> > than one who have such Majority, and have an equal Number of Votes, then
> the
> > House of Representatives shall immediately chuse by Ballot one of them
for
> > President; and if no Person have a Majority, then from the five highest
on
> > the List the said House shall in like Manner chuse the President. But in
> > chusing the President, the Votes shall be taken by States, the
> > Representation from each State having one Vote; A quorum for this
purpose
> > shall consist of a Member or Members from two thirds of the States, and
a
> > Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice. In every
Case,
> > after the Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number
> of
> > Votes of the Electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should
> > remain two or more who have equal Votes, the Senate shall chuse from
them
> by
> > Ballot the Vice President.
> >
> > The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day
> on
> > which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same
throughout
> > the United States.
> >
> > No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United
> States,
> > at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to
the
> > Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office
> who
> > shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been
fourteen
> > Years a Resident within the United States.
> >
> > In Case of the Removal of the President from Office, or of his Death,
> > Resignation, or Inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the said
> > Office, the Same shall devolve on the Vice President, and the Congress
may
> > by Law provide for the Case of Removal, Death, Resignation or Inability,
> > both of the President and Vice President, declaring what Officer shall
> then
> > act as President, and such Officer shall act accordingly, until the
> > Disability be removed, or a President shall be elected.
> >
> > The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a
> > Compensation, which shall neither be increased nor diminished during the
> > Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive
> within
> > that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or any of them.
> >
> > Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the
> following
> > Oath or Affirmation:--"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will
> > faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and
will
> to
> > the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of
> the
> > United States."
> >
> > Section. 2.
> >
> > The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the
> United
> > States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the
> > actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in
> writing,
> > of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any
> > Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall
> > have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offences against the
United
> > States, except in Cases of Impeachment.
> >
> > He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate,
to
> > make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and
he
> > shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate,
> shall
> > appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the
> > supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose
> > Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be
> > established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of
> such
> > inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the
> > Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.
> >
> > The President shall have Power to fill up all Vacancies that may happen
> > during the Recess of the Senate, by granting Commissions which shall
> expire
> > at the End of their next Session.
> >
> > Section. 3.
> >
> > He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State
> of
> > the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he
shall
> > judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary Occasions,
convene
> > both Houses, or either of them, and in Case of Disagreement between
them,
> > with Respect to the Time of Adjournment, he may adjourn them to such
Time
> as
> > he shall think proper; he shall receive Ambassadors and other public
> > Ministers; he shall take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed, and
> > shall Commission all the Officers of the United States.
> >
> > Section. 4.
> >
> > The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United
States,
> > shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of,
> Treason,
> > Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.
> >
> >
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
> > ----
> >
> > Article III.
> >
> > Section. 1.
> >
> > The judicial Power of the United States shall be vested in one supreme
> > Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time
> > ordain and establish. The Judges, both of the supreme and inferior
Courts,
> > shall hold their Offices during good Behaviour, and shall, at stated
> Times,
> > receive for their Services a Compensation, which shall not be diminished
> > during their Continuance in Office.
> >
> > Section. 2.
> >
> > The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising
> > under this Constitution, the Laws of the United States, and Treaties
made,
> > or which shall be made, under their Authority;--to all Cases affecting
> > Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls;--to all Cases of
> admiralty
> > and maritime Jurisdiction;--to Controversies to which the United States
> > shall be a Party;--to Controversies between two or more States;--
between
> a
> > State and Citizens of another State;--between Citizens of different
> > States;--between Citizens of the same State claiming Lands under Grants
of
> > different States, and between a State, or the Citizens thereof, and
> foreign
> > States, Citizens or Subjects.
> >
> > In all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls,
> and
> > those in which a State shall be Party, the supreme Court shall have
> original
> > Jurisdiction. In all the other Cases before mentioned, the supreme Court
> > shall have appellate Jurisdiction, both as to Law and Fact, with such
> > Exceptions, and under such Regulations as the Congress shall make.
> >
> > The Trial of all Crimes, except in Cases of Impeachment, shall be by
Jury;
> > and such Trial shall be held in the State where the said Crimes shall
have
> > been committed; but when not committed within any State, the Trial shall
> be
> > at such Place or Places as the Congress may by Law have directed.
> >
> > Section. 3.
> >
> > Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War
> against
> > them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No
> > Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two
> > Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court.
> >
> > The Congress shall have Power to declare the Punishment of Treason, but
no
> > Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture
except
> > during the Life of the Person attainted.
> >
> >
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
> > ----
> >
> > Article. IV.
> >
> > Section. 1.
> >
> > Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts,
> > Records, and judicial Proceedings of every other State. And the Congress
> may
> > by general Laws prescribe the Manner in which such Acts, Records and
> > Proceedings shall be proved, and the Effect thereof.
> >
> > Section. 2.
> >
> > The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and
> > Immunities of Citizens in the several States.
> >
> > A Person charged in any State with Treason, Felony, or other Crime, who
> > shall flee from Justice, and be found in another State, shall on Demand
of
> > the executive Authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered
up,
> to
> > be removed to the State having Jurisdiction of the Crime.
> >
> > No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws
thereof,
> > escaping into another, shall, in Consequence of any Law or Regulation
> > therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, but shall be
delivered
> > up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labour may be due.
> >
> > Section. 3.
> >
> > New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new
> State
> > shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State;
nor
> > any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or Parts of
> > States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned
as
> > well as of the Congress.
> >
> > The Congress shall have Power to dispose of and make all needful Rules
and
> > Regulations respecting the Territory or other Property belonging to the
> > United States; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed as
> to
> > Prejudice any Claims of the United States, or of any particular State.
> >
> > Section. 4.
> >
> > The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a
> Republican
> > Form of Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion; and
> on
> > Application of the Legislature, or of the Executive (when the
Legislature
> > cannot be convened), against domestic Violence.
> >
> >
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
> > ----
> >
> > Article. V.
> >
> > The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it
necessary,
> > shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of
> the
> > Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a
Convention
> > for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all
> > Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when ratified by the
> > Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions
in
> > three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may
be
> > proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made
> prior
> > to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner
> affect
> > the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article;
> and
> > that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal
> Suffrage
> > in the Senate.
> >
> >
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
> > ----
> >
> > Article. VI.
> >
> > All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption
of
> > this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under
this
> > Constitution, as under the Confederation.
> >
> > This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made
> in
> > Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under
> the
> > Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land;
and
> > the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the
> > Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.
> >
> > The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of
the
> > several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers,
both
> of
> > the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or
> > Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall
> ever
> > be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the
> > United States.
> >
> >
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
> > ----
> >
> > Article. VII.
> >
> > The Ratification of the Conventions of nine States, shall be sufficient
> for
> > the Establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying
the
> > Same.
> >
> > The Word, "the," being interlined between the seventh and eighth Lines
of
> > the first Page, the Word "Thirty" being partly written on an Erazure in
> the
> > fifteenth Line of the first Page, The Words "is tried" being interlined
> > between the thirty second and thirty third Lines of the first Page and
the
> > Word "the" being interlined between the forty third and forty fourth
Lines
> > of the second Page.
> >
> > Attest William Jackson Secretary
> >
> > Done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States present the
> > Seventeenth Day of September in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven
> > hundred and Eighty seven and of the Independence of the United States of
> > America the Twelfth In witness whereof We have hereunto subscribed our
> > Names,
> >
> > G°. Washington
> > Presidt and deputy from Virginia
> >
> > Delaware
> > Geo: Read
> > Gunning Bedford jun
> > John Dickinson
> > Richard Bassett
> > Jaco: Broom
> >
> > Maryland
> > James McHenry
> > Dan of St Thos. Jenifer
> > Danl. Carroll
> >
> > Virginia
> > John Blair
> > James Madison Jr.
> >
> > North Carolina
> > Wm. Blount
> > Richd. Dobbs Spaight
> > Hu Williamson
> >
> > South Carolina
> > J. Rutledge
> > Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
> > Charles Pinckney
> > Pierce Butler
> >
> > Georgia
> > William Few
> > Abr Baldwin
> >
> > New Hampshire
> > John Langdon
> > Nicholas Gilman
> >
> > Massachusetts
> > Nathaniel Gorham
> > Rufus King
> >
> > Connecticut
> > Wm. Saml. Johnson
> > Roger Sherman
> >
> > New York
> > Alexander Hamilton
> >
> > New Jersey
> > Wil: Livingston
> > David Brearley
> > Wm. Paterson
> > Jona: Dayton
> >
> > Pennsylvania
> > B Franklin
> > Thomas Mifflin
> > Robt. Morris
> > Geo. Clymer
> > Thos. FitzSimons
> > Jared Ingersoll
> > James Wilson
> > Gouv Morris
> >
> >
> >
>
>

SST
July 4th 03, 09:42 PM
No its not, I'm just reply with anger to some moron.


"Quixote" > wrote in message
...
>
> "SST" > wrote in message
> t...
> > Eat me you f**ng ass! who the hell do you think you are, some sort of
> > net-cop.
> >
> > F**k off and die. I've been reading your dribble, you're stupid and
> boring.
> >
> > Report me all you want, I could care less. There is little anyone can
do,
> or
> > wants too except for you.
> >
>
> What a stalwart representation of Justice, Tranquility, Welfare, and
> Liberty.
>
> Quixote
>
>
>

Adrian
July 4th 03, 09:43 PM
"neopolaris" <.> wrote in message ...
> I love living in the most powerful country in the world. Commie
crunching,
> frog smashing, kraut killing...

Speaks the racist...

~ Adrian ~

neopolaris
July 4th 03, 09:57 PM
"Herr Pie" > wrote in message
t...
> Happy Birthday USA :)
>
>

Roger That!

Martin Eriksson
July 4th 03, 10:25 PM
"janh" > wrote in message
t...
YEAH BABY! I'm With YA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
"neopolaris" <.> wrote in message ...

Your useless message just kicked out about 40 messages from my news server.
Thank you very much (irony).

*PLONK* (yeah you too)

/M

John Russell
July 4th 03, 10:47 PM
"Herr Pie" > wrote in message
t...
> Happy Birthday USA :)
>
>
I'm sure the relatives of those troops dying in Iraq feel the same. Of
course they don't!
There asking "didn't we win"? Why are those nasty people shooting at us in
their country? How can they be dying when we have "peace through superior
firepower"?
July 4th should be a time for americans to recollect what men and women are
willing to sacrice to win and defend their country. This is hard thing to
recocile with occupying another country in the name of freedom.

Dave
July 5th 03, 12:46 AM
"bongdaddyboo" > wrote in message
...
> SST wrote:
> > I'm just reply with anger to some moron.
>
> You're a little frustrated then aren't you. Did someone disrespect a
piece
> of Nvidia hardware you own or something?

More like a little piece of software that won't get hard...

> --
> take a hit dude,
> Bongdaddyboo
>
>

Michael Robertson
July 5th 03, 01:06 AM
merkins!!! coulnt eat a whole one.But the iraq's seem to be doing a good job
by the way you merkins found any WMD's yet!!!
"John Russell" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Herr Pie" > wrote in message
> t...
> > Happy Birthday USA :)
> >
> >
> I'm sure the relatives of those troops dying in Iraq feel the same. Of
> course they don't!
> There asking "didn't we win"? Why are those nasty people shooting at us in
> their country? How can they be dying when we have "peace through superior
> firepower"?
> July 4th should be a time for americans to recollect what men and women
are
> willing to sacrice to win and defend their country. This is hard thing to
> recocile with occupying another country in the name of freedom.
>
>

Dave
July 5th 03, 01:26 AM
"Michael Robertson" > wrote in message
...
> merkins!!! coulnt eat a whole one.But the iraq's seem to be doing a good
job

While they're not busy eating their female children, I suppose...

> by the way you merkins found any WMD's yet!!!

"Merkins" eh? My how original. Pfaugh. Pommies. ;-) Well, didn't ol' Tony
Baby throw in his lot with Dubya? Didn't he pledge his allegiance to OUR
flag? How quickly we forget...

> "John Russell" > wrote in message
> ...
snip

bp
July 5th 03, 03:18 AM
On Fri, 4 Jul 2003 23:25:48 +0200, "Martin Eriksson"
> wrote:

>Your useless message just kicked out about 40 messages from my news server.
>Thank you very much (irony).

Man you have a crappy news server.
Also how do you know that ?
>
>*PLONK* (yeah you too)

Allan Laws
July 5th 03, 03:49 AM
What a piece of ****.


SST > wrote in message
t...
> The Constitution of the United States:
>
> We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union,
> establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common
> defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty
to
> ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for
> the United States of America.
>
>
> Article. I.
>
> Section. 1.
>
> All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the
> United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of
Representatives.
>
> Section. 2.
>
> The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every
> second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each
> State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most
> numerous Branch of the State Legislature.
>
> No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age
> of twenty five Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States,
> and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which
he
> shall be chosen.
>
> Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several
> States which may be included within this Union, according to their
> respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole
Number
> of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and
> excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons. The actual
> Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of
the
> Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten
> Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number of
> Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each
> State shall have at Least one Representative; and until such enumeration
> shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to chuse
three,
> Massachusetts eight, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations one,
> Connecticut five, New-York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight,
> Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South
> Carolina five, and Georgia three.
>
> When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive
> Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies.
>
> The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Officers;
> and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment.
>
> Section. 3.
>
> The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from
each
> State, chosen by the Legislature thereof for six Years; and each Senator
> shall have one Vote.
>
> Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the first
> Election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three Classes.
The
> Seats of the Senators of the first Class shall be vacated at the
Expiration
> of the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth
> Year, and of the third Class at the Expiration of the sixth Year, so that
> one third may be chosen every second Year; and if Vacancies happen by
> Resignation, or otherwise, during the Recess of the Legislature of any
> State, the Executive thereof may make temporary Appointments until the
next
> Meeting of the Legislature, which shall then fill such Vacancies.
>
> No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of
> thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who
> shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall
> be chosen.
>
> The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate,
> but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided.
>
> The Senate shall chuse their other Officers, and also a President pro
> tempore, in the Absence of the Vice President, or when he shall exercise
the
> Office of President of the United States.
>
> The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting
> for that Purpose, they shall be on Oath or Affirmation. When the President
> of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no
> Person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the
> Members present.
>
> Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal
> from Office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any Office of honor,
> Trust or Profit under the United States: but the Party convicted shall
> nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and
> Punishment, according to Law.
>
> Section. 4.
>
> The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and
> Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature
> thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such
> Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.
>
> The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such Meeting
> shall be on the first Monday in December, unless they shall by Law appoint
a
> different Day.
>
> Section. 5.
>
> Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Qualifications
> of its own Members, and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do
> Business; but a smaller Number may adjourn from day to day, and may be
> authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such Manner, and
> under such Penalties as each House may provide.
>
> Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members
> for disorderly Behaviour, and, with the Concurrence of two thirds, expel a
> Member.
>
> Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to time
> publish the same, excepting such Parts as may in their Judgment require
> Secrecy; and the Yeas and Nays of the Members of either House on any
> question shall, at the Desire of one fifth of those Present, be entered on
> the Journal.
>
> Neither House, during the Session of Congress, shall, without the Consent
of
> the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other Place than
> that in which the two Houses shall be sitting.
>
> Section. 6.
>
> The Senators and Representatives shall receive a Compensation for their
> Services, to be ascertained by Law, and paid out of the Treasury of the
> United States. They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach
of
> the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the
Session
> of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same;
and
> for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in
> any other Place.
>
> No Senator or Representative shall, during the Time for which he was
> elected, be appointed to any civil Office under the Authority of the
United
> States, which shall have been created, or the Emoluments whereof shall
have
> been encreased during such time; and no Person holding any Office under
the
> United States, shall be a Member of either House during his Continuance in
> Office.
>
> Section. 7.
>
> All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of
> Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as
on
> other Bills.
>
> Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the
> Senate, shall, before it become a Law, be presented to the President of
the
> United States: If he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall return
> it, with his Objections to that House in which it shall have originated,
who
> shall enter the Objections at large on their Journal, and proceed to
> reconsider it.If after such Reconsideration two thirds of that House shall
> agree to pass the Bill, it shall be sent, together with the Objections, to
> the other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if
approved
> by two thirds of that House, it shall become a Law. But in all such Cases
> the Votes of both Houses shall be determined by yeas and Nays, and the
Names
> of the Persons voting for and against the Bill shall be entered on the
> Journal of each House respectively. If any Bill shall not be returned by
the
> President within ten Days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been
> presented to him, the Same shall be a Law, in like Manner as if he had
> signed it, unless the Congress by their Adjournment prevent its Return, in
> which Case it shall not be a Law.
>
> Every Order, Resolution, or Vote to which the Concurrence of the Senate
and
> House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a question of
> Adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States; and
> before the Same shall take Effect, shall be approved by him, or being
> disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two thirds of the Senate and
House
> of Representatives, according to the Rules and Limitations prescribed in
the
> Case of a Bill.
>
> Section. 8.
>
> The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts
and
> Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general
> Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be
> uniform throughout the United States;
>
> To borrow Money on the credit of the United States;
>
> To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States,
and
> with the Indian Tribes;
>
> To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the
> subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States;
>
> To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix
the
> Standard of Weights and Measures;
>
> To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securities and current
> Coin of the United States;
>
> To establish Post Offices and post Roads;
>
> To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for
limited
> Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective
> Writings and Discoveries;
>
> To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;
>
> To define and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas, and
> Offences against the Law of Nations;
>
> To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules
> concerning Captures on Land and Water;
>
> To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use
shall
> be for a longer Term than two Years;
>
> To provide and maintain a Navy;
>
> To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval
> Forces;
>
> To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union,
> suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions;
>
> To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the Militia, and for
> governing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the
United
> States, reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the
> Officers, and the Authority of training the Militia according to the
> discipline prescribed by Congress;
>
> To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such
> District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of particular
> States, and the Acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government
of
> the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places
purchased
> by the Consent of the Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be,
> for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-Yards, and other
> needful Buildings;--And
>
> To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into
> Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this
> Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department
or
> Officer thereof.
>
> Section. 9.
>
> The Migration or Importation of such Persons as any of the States now
> existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the
> Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a Tax
> or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars for
> each Person.
>
> The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless
> when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it.
>
> No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed.
>
> No Capitation, or other direct, Tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to
> the Census or enumeration herein before directed to be taken.
>
> No Tax or Duty shall be laid on Articles exported from any State.
>
> No Preference shall be given by any Regulation of Commerce or Revenue to
the
> Ports of one State over those of another; nor shall Vessels bound to, or
> from, one State, be obliged to enter, clear, or pay Duties in another.
>
> No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of
> Appropriations made by Law; and a regular Statement and Account of the
> Receipts and Expenditures of all public Money shall be published from time
> to time.
>
> No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person
> holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the
Consent
> of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of
any
> kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.
>
> Section. 10.
>
> No State shall enter into any Treaty, Alliance, or Confederation; grant
> Letters of Marque and Reprisal; coin Money; emit Bills of Credit; make any
> Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts; pass any Bill
> of Attainder, ex post facto Law, or Law impairing the Obligation of
> Contracts, or grant any Title of Nobility.
>
> No State shall, without the Consent of the Congress, lay any Imposts or
> Duties on Imports or Exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for
> executing it's inspection Laws: and the net Produce of all Duties and
> Imposts, laid by any State on Imports or Exports, shall be for the Use of
> the Treasury of the United States; and all such Laws shall be subject to
the
> Revision and Controul of the Congress.
>
> No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any Duty of Tonnage,
> keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement or
> Compact with another State, or with a foreign Power, or engage in War,
> unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of
> delay.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> ----
>
> Article. II.
>
> Section. 1.
>
> The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of
> America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years, and,
> together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected, as
> follows:
>
> Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may
> direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and
> Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no
> Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit
> under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.
>
> The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by Ballot for
> two Persons, of whom one at least shall not be an Inhabitant of the same
> State with themselves. And they shall make a List of all the Persons voted
> for, and of the Number of Votes for each; which List they shall sign and
> certify, and transmit sealed to the Seat of the Government of the United
> States, directed to the President of the Senate. The President of the
Senate
> shall, in the Presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open
all
> the Certificates, and the Votes shall then be counted. The Person having
the
> greatest Number of Votes shall be the President, if such Number be a
> Majority of the whole Number of Electors appointed; and if there be more
> than one who have such Majority, and have an equal Number of Votes, then
the
> House of Representatives shall immediately chuse by Ballot one of them for
> President; and if no Person have a Majority, then from the five highest on
> the List the said House shall in like Manner chuse the President. But in
> chusing the President, the Votes shall be taken by States, the
> Representation from each State having one Vote; A quorum for this purpose
> shall consist of a Member or Members from two thirds of the States, and a
> Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice. In every Case,
> after the Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number
of
> Votes of the Electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should
> remain two or more who have equal Votes, the Senate shall chuse from them
by
> Ballot the Vice President.
>
> The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day
on
> which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout
> the United States.
>
> No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United
States,
> at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the
> Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office
who
> shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen
> Years a Resident within the United States.
>
> In Case of the Removal of the President from Office, or of his Death,
> Resignation, or Inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the said
> Office, the Same shall devolve on the Vice President, and the Congress may
> by Law provide for the Case of Removal, Death, Resignation or Inability,
> both of the President and Vice President, declaring what Officer shall
then
> act as President, and such Officer shall act accordingly, until the
> Disability be removed, or a President shall be elected.
>
> The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a
> Compensation, which shall neither be increased nor diminished during the
> Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive
within
> that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or any of them.
>
> Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the
following
> Oath or Affirmation:--"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will
> faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will
to
> the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of
the
> United States."
>
> Section. 2.
>
> The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the
United
> States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the
> actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in
writing,
> of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any
> Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall
> have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offences against the United
> States, except in Cases of Impeachment.
>
> He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to
> make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he
> shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate,
shall
> appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the
> supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose
> Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be
> established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of
such
> inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the
> Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.
>
> The President shall have Power to fill up all Vacancies that may happen
> during the Recess of the Senate, by granting Commissions which shall
expire
> at the End of their next Session.
>
> Section. 3.
>
> He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State
of
> the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall
> judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary Occasions, convene
> both Houses, or either of them, and in Case of Disagreement between them,
> with Respect to the Time of Adjournment, he may adjourn them to such Time
as
> he shall think proper; he shall receive Ambassadors and other public
> Ministers; he shall take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed, and
> shall Commission all the Officers of the United States.
>
> Section. 4.
>
> The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States,
> shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of,
Treason,
> Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> ----
>
> Article III.
>
> Section. 1.
>
> The judicial Power of the United States shall be vested in one supreme
> Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time
> ordain and establish. The Judges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts,
> shall hold their Offices during good Behaviour, and shall, at stated
Times,
> receive for their Services a Compensation, which shall not be diminished
> during their Continuance in Office.
>
> Section. 2.
>
> The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising
> under this Constitution, the Laws of the United States, and Treaties made,
> or which shall be made, under their Authority;--to all Cases affecting
> Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls;--to all Cases of
admiralty
> and maritime Jurisdiction;--to Controversies to which the United States
> shall be a Party;--to Controversies between two or more States;-- between
a
> State and Citizens of another State;--between Citizens of different
> States;--between Citizens of the same State claiming Lands under Grants of
> different States, and between a State, or the Citizens thereof, and
foreign
> States, Citizens or Subjects.
>
> In all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls,
and
> those in which a State shall be Party, the supreme Court shall have
original
> Jurisdiction. In all the other Cases before mentioned, the supreme Court
> shall have appellate Jurisdiction, both as to Law and Fact, with such
> Exceptions, and under such Regulations as the Congress shall make.
>
> The Trial of all Crimes, except in Cases of Impeachment, shall be by Jury;
> and such Trial shall be held in the State where the said Crimes shall have
> been committed; but when not committed within any State, the Trial shall
be
> at such Place or Places as the Congress may by Law have directed.
>
> Section. 3.
>
> Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War
against
> them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No
> Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two
> Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court.
>
> The Congress shall have Power to declare the Punishment of Treason, but no
> Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except
> during the Life of the Person attainted.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> ----
>
> Article. IV.
>
> Section. 1.
>
> Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts,
> Records, and judicial Proceedings of every other State. And the Congress
may
> by general Laws prescribe the Manner in which such Acts, Records and
> Proceedings shall be proved, and the Effect thereof.
>
> Section. 2.
>
> The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and
> Immunities of Citizens in the several States.
>
> A Person charged in any State with Treason, Felony, or other Crime, who
> shall flee from Justice, and be found in another State, shall on Demand of
> the executive Authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up,
to
> be removed to the State having Jurisdiction of the Crime.
>
> No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof,
> escaping into another, shall, in Consequence of any Law or Regulation
> therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, but shall be delivered
> up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labour may be due.
>
> Section. 3.
>
> New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new
State
> shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor
> any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or Parts of
> States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as
> well as of the Congress.
>
> The Congress shall have Power to dispose of and make all needful Rules and
> Regulations respecting the Territory or other Property belonging to the
> United States; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed as
to
> Prejudice any Claims of the United States, or of any particular State.
>
> Section. 4.
>
> The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a
Republican
> Form of Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion; and
on
> Application of the Legislature, or of the Executive (when the Legislature
> cannot be convened), against domestic Violence.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> ----
>
> Article. V.
>
> The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary,
> shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of
the
> Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention
> for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all
> Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when ratified by the
> Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in
> three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be
> proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made
prior
> to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner
affect
> the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article;
and
> that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal
Suffrage
> in the Senate.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> ----
>
> Article. VI.
>
> All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption of
> this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this
> Constitution, as under the Confederation.
>
> This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made
in
> Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under
the
> Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and
> the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the
> Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.
>
> The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the
> several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both
of
> the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or
> Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall
ever
> be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the
> United States.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> ----
>
> Article. VII.
>
> The Ratification of the Conventions of nine States, shall be sufficient
for
> the Establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the
> Same.
>
> The Word, "the," being interlined between the seventh and eighth Lines of
> the first Page, the Word "Thirty" being partly written on an Erazure in
the
> fifteenth Line of the first Page, The Words "is tried" being interlined
> between the thirty second and thirty third Lines of the first Page and the
> Word "the" being interlined between the forty third and forty fourth Lines
> of the second Page.
>
> Attest William Jackson Secretary
>
> Done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States present the
> Seventeenth Day of September in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven
> hundred and Eighty seven and of the Independence of the United States of
> America the Twelfth In witness whereof We have hereunto subscribed our
> Names,
>
> G°. Washington
> Presidt and deputy from Virginia
>
> Delaware
> Geo: Read
> Gunning Bedford jun
> John Dickinson
> Richard Bassett
> Jaco: Broom
>
> Maryland
> James McHenry
> Dan of St Thos. Jenifer
> Danl. Carroll
>
> Virginia
> John Blair
> James Madison Jr.
>
> North Carolina
> Wm. Blount
> Richd. Dobbs Spaight
> Hu Williamson
>
> South Carolina
> J. Rutledge
> Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
> Charles Pinckney
> Pierce Butler
>
> Georgia
> William Few
> Abr Baldwin
>
> New Hampshire
> John Langdon
> Nicholas Gilman
>
> Massachusetts
> Nathaniel Gorham
> Rufus King
>
> Connecticut
> Wm. Saml. Johnson
> Roger Sherman
>
> New York
> Alexander Hamilton
>
> New Jersey
> Wil: Livingston
> David Brearley
> Wm. Paterson
> Jona: Dayton
>
> Pennsylvania
> B Franklin
> Thomas Mifflin
> Robt. Morris
> Geo. Clymer
> Thos. FitzSimons
> Jared Ingersoll
> James Wilson
> Gouv Morris
>
>
>

SST
July 5th 03, 04:40 AM
hehehe, sorrry my fingers stutter.


"bongdaddyboo" > wrote in message
...
> SST wrote:
> > LOL, what a looser you must be!
>
> Your opinion of me is obviously aimed higher than mine of you. And that's
> *loser*, since you seem to have lost your dictionary.
>
> > '...verbal and physical threats...' what a fagot!
>
> And that's *faggot*. I think my good lady would have a thing or two to
say
> about calling me one though.
>
> > go smoke another bone and kill what few brain cells you have left.
>
> I'm obviously packing a few more brain cells than you.
>
> You still haven't got it yet, have you?
> --
> take a hit dude,
> bongdaddyboo
>
>

SST
July 5th 03, 04:44 AM
?

I own ATI. Had nvidia NForce2 but gave it to the kids, replace with Intel
i875 and a P4c at 3320Mhz on a 255Mzh FSB. I've had the same Radeon 9700p
since September of last year.

My 3DMarks score jumped almost 2000 points to as high as 19200 when I
swapped out for the Intel/P4 system - fast as lightning.


"bongdaddyboo" > wrote in message
...
> SST wrote:
> > I'm just reply with anger to some moron.
>
> You're a little frustrated then aren't you. Did someone disrespect a
piece
> of Nvidia hardware you own or something?
> --
> take a hit dude,
> Bongdaddyboo
>
>

SST
July 5th 03, 04:49 AM
Kiddie Porn?!?

WOW, that's not even funny! I have kids you know and I find that very
offensive!

I speak to hundreds of people on usenet, I don't recall you Dave but if your
some freak then go take your medication and stay away from me.

I'll add you to my kill file - OK?



"Dave" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> You at it again, Mr. Overcompensation/Macho Insecurity? Want another
> smack-down like only I can give you? Remember the last one? We can search
> for it on Deja News if you like. Your kiddie-porn habits haven't changed
> much since then, I see. Some people never learn...
>
> "SST" > wrote in message
> t...
> > Eat me you f**ng ass! who the hell do you think you are, some sort of
> > net-cop.
> >
> > F**k off and die. I've been reading your dribble, you're stupid and
> boring.
> >
> > Report me all you want, I could care less. There is little anyone can
do,
> or
> > wants too except for you.
> >
> >
> >
> > "bongdaddyboo" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > SST wrote:
> > >
> > > > The Constitution of the United States:
> > >
> > > <Irrelevant message snipped>
> > >
> > > Please stop cross-posting this tosh. Nobody wants it and it's got sod
> all
> > > to do with any of the groups you've crossposted to.
> > >
> > > Besides, the AUP & T&Cs of your ISP expressly forbid you to
"Cross-post
> > the
> > > same or substantially similar message excessively" so you've just
earned
> > > yourself an abuse report sir!
> > > --
> > > take a hit dude,
> > > bongdaddyboo
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>

SST
July 5th 03, 06:01 AM
why such hostility Dave?



"Dave" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Do yourself and the rest of the world a favor and add yourself to your
kill
> file...
>
> "SST" > wrote in message
> t...
> > Kiddie Porn?!?
> >
> > WOW, that's not even funny! I have kids you know and I find that very
> > offensive!
> >
> > I speak to hundreds of people on usenet, I don't recall you Dave but if
> your
> > some freak then go take your medication and stay away from me.
> >
> > I'll add you to my kill file - OK?
> >
> >
> >
> > "Dave" > wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]
> > > You at it again, Mr. Overcompensation/Macho Insecurity? Want another
> > > smack-down like only I can give you? Remember the last one? We can
> search
> > > for it on Deja News if you like. Your kiddie-porn habits haven't
changed
> > > much since then, I see. Some people never learn...
> > >
> > > "SST" > wrote in message
> > > t...
> > > > Eat me you f**ng ass! who the hell do you think you are, some sort
of
> > > > net-cop.
> > > >
> > > > F**k off and die. I've been reading your dribble, you're stupid and
> > > boring.
> > > >
> > > > Report me all you want, I could care less. There is little anyone
can
> > do,
> > > or
> > > > wants too except for you.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > "bongdaddyboo" > wrote in message
> > > > ...
> > > > > SST wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > > The Constitution of the United States:
> > > > >
> > > > > <Irrelevant message snipped>
> > > > >
> > > > > Please stop cross-posting this tosh. Nobody wants it and it's got
> sod
> > > all
> > > > > to do with any of the groups you've crossposted to.
> > > > >
> > > > > Besides, the AUP & T&Cs of your ISP expressly forbid you to
> > "Cross-post
> > > > the
> > > > > same or substantially similar message excessively" so you've just
> > earned
> > > > > yourself an abuse report sir!
> > > > > --
> > > > > take a hit dude,
> > > > > bongdaddyboo
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>

bongdaddyboo
July 5th 03, 09:23 AM
SST wrote:
> ?

Now you've got it. Congratulations, you're on topic!!

> I own ATI. Had nvidia NForce2 but gave it to the kids, replace with
> Intel i875 and a P4c at 3320Mhz on a 255Mzh FSB. I've had the same
> Radeon 9700p since September of last year.

Not bad at all. Mine's an NForce2 with an Athlon XP 3200 and a 9700pro.
Not bothered in the slightest about overclocking though - if I need the
extra speed I'll lay down the cash for something else.

> My 3DMarks score jumped almost 2000 points to as high as 19200 when I
> swapped out for the Intel/P4 system - fast as lightning.

Never bothered 3DMarking (or any other benchmarks) because it plays the
games ridiculously well and goes bloody fast.
--
take a hit dude,
Bongdaddyboo

bongdaddyboo
July 5th 03, 09:23 AM
ceedee wrote:
> my geforce 3 ti200 died yesterday
> so should this thread

8.1/10
--
take a hit dude,
Bongdaddyboo

Martin Eriksson
July 5th 03, 09:29 AM
"bp" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 4 Jul 2003 23:25:48 +0200, "Martin Eriksson"
> > wrote:
>
> >Your useless message just kicked out about 40 messages from my news
server.
> >Thank you very much (irony).
>
> Man you have a crappy news server.
> Also how do you know that ?

So you think that the hard drives of my news server physically increase in
size when new posts appear?

The basic posting in a NG is about 1.5 kB so I divided 70 by 1.5 (roughly).

/M

Icarus ^i^
July 5th 03, 11:53 AM
SST wrote:
:: The Constitution of the United States:

**** off.. this doesn't belong in this group..

SST
July 5th 03, 02:32 PM
Oh but remember, overclocking isn't about getting something for nothing. Its
about getting something you can't buy.

I just read a THG article on the P4c 3200 Vs. the XP3200+. The P4c 2.8, 3.0
and 3.2 all beat the XP3200+ in each and every bench test. No that the
XP3200+ is poor, its quite amazing for 2200MHz.

Point is that I'm looking at the scores and thinking how my CPU beats
everyone if his scores by a large margin! SO what I have you can't even buy
if you wanted to. You have to OC it or wait till a newer faster one is
released and these were just released so its going to be a long wait.



"bongdaddyboo" > wrote in message
...
> SST wrote:
> > ?
>
> Now you've got it. Congratulations, you're on topic!!
>
> > I own ATI. Had nvidia NForce2 but gave it to the kids, replace with
> > Intel i875 and a P4c at 3320Mhz on a 255Mzh FSB. I've had the same
> > Radeon 9700p since September of last year.
>
> Not bad at all. Mine's an NForce2 with an Athlon XP 3200 and a 9700pro.
> Not bothered in the slightest about overclocking though - if I need the
> extra speed I'll lay down the cash for something else.
>
> > My 3DMarks score jumped almost 2000 points to as high as 19200 when I
> > swapped out for the Intel/P4 system - fast as lightning.
>
> Never bothered 3DMarking (or any other benchmarks) because it plays the
> games ridiculously well and goes bloody fast.
> --
> take a hit dude,
> Bongdaddyboo
>
>
>

SST
July 5th 03, 03:26 PM
I had an XP at 2400Mhz (still do actually) on an NF2 board. Benchmarks were
high and game play was good.

After switching to an all Intel machine after so many years I immediately
experienced something that I didn't expect.

The Intel machine was not only faster but MUCH smoother and more pleasurable
to use. Many of my games that ran fast but were experiencing some occasional
stuttering which was attributed to the video card and its drivers completely
went away. So it wasn't the video card or its drivers but rather the systems
chipset all along.

My all-Intel system is better in every way. Forget about benchmarks, you're
right! Its meaningless.
After just using this new system for a couple of weeks now, I can tell you
whole heartedly that its way better then the last few AMD/whomever systems I
have owned.

The problem isn't with AMD, they make great CPU's the problem is the
chipsets.

This is one of my hobbies, I continuously buy and build computer systems for
myself and others. I'm quite knowledgeable so you can rule out human error
for the most part.



"bongdaddyboo" > wrote in message
...
> SST wrote:
> > Oh but remember, overclocking isn't about getting something for
> > nothing. Its about getting something you can't buy.
>
> That's one way of looking at it.
>
> > I just read a THG article on the P4c 3200 Vs. the XP3200+. The P4c
> > 2.8, 3.0 and 3.2 all beat the XP3200+ in each and every bench test.
> > No that the XP3200+ is poor, its quite amazing for 2200MHz.
>
> While the P4c at equivalent ratings might give the Athlon a hammering in
the
> majority benchies, it's not something I really give a monkeys about.
> Benchmarketeering means nothing to me - it's the gameplay experience that
> counts.
>
> The chipzilla equivalent chip may be faster, but so what? My Clio 172
might
> not be as fast as my neighbour's remapped Mini Cooper, but I can say with
> absolute certainty that the experience in my car more than makes up for
the
> lack of power.
>
> > Point is that I'm looking at the scores and thinking how my
> > CPU beats everyone if his scores by a large margin!
>
> So? I'm completely sure there'll be a whole busload of people out there
who
> would be quite capable of bitch-slapping your scores into next year
without
> any effort at all.
>
> Me, I don't care. I have what I want and I'm content with it.
>
> > SO what I have you can't even buy if you wanted to.
>
> I know. But as I said earlier, I couldn't give a monkeys.
>
> > You have to OC it or wait till a newer faster one is
> > released and these were just released so its going to
> > be a long wait.
>
> And the wait will be oh so pleasureable.
> --
> take a hit dude,
> Bongdaddyboo
>
>
>
>

SST
July 5th 03, 03:29 PM
First time I posted these patriotic postings I did so because the majority
of the posters are American. I didn't do anything more then post the words.
No commentary. Just a simple 'Happy Birthday' - take it for what its worth.
Read it if you want to or pass it by. Your choice.

If anyone was to reply, I thought it would be about the text. Boy was I
wrong! It immediately drew anger and backlash. I though, why? So I repeated
it each year for a few years now and each and every time it gets the same
very negative response. Again I ask, why?

Forget about off topic rhetoric. These usenet get hammered with SPAM about
penis enlargement to buying diplomas. Its just an excuse to yell out so I
disregard the comments.

If a Brit or a Frank had done so on their countries patriotic holiday, I
doubt gangs of Americans would have came out and posted hate and
defilements. I really believe that.

There were actually just seven direct replies. (maybe more)
1- Kai Robinson calling the document 'crap'
2- HamMan calling it 'patriotic garbage'
3- TheSingingCat calling it 'a bunch of useless stuff'
4- Thor stating that most americans are stupid
5- Martin Eriksson 'Well just wait until I post the Swedish "constitution"
on our national day.' (which I did already)
6-Fig says 'ALLLLLLLL you yanks hav fonny name' (funny)
7-Allan Laws comment; 'Why would anyone celebrate the birth of the biggest
pack of arseholes on the
planet.'

All comments were from non-Americans and all were completely unnecessary and
filled with hate except for Fig he just pointed out the funny names, which
were British BTW.

Most of you put together pieces to create some demented Picasso of what you
perceive as reality. You judge others on distorted facts and lack of
information. Most are quick to throw stones but we forget that we all live
in glass houses.

There was nothing wrong with my posting. It was the replies that were wrong.

I appoligize for nothing!

Banjo Dolt
July 5th 03, 03:36 PM
In article >,
says...
> I had an XP at 2400Mhz (still do actually) on an NF2 board. Benchmarks were
> high and game play was good.
>
> After switching to an all Intel machine after so many years I immediately
> experienced something that I didn't expect.
>
> The Intel machine was not only faster but MUCH smoother and more pleasurable
> to use. Many of my games that ran fast but were experiencing some occasional
> stuttering which was attributed to the video card and its drivers completely
> went away. So it wasn't the video card or its drivers but rather the systems
> chipset all along.
>

Would stepping up from my XP1700 to a Celeron 2.4gig be enough to smooth
out my SVCD captures? I just picked up an 8500DV...and while I'm
pleased with the product, the SVCD captures have not been as smooth as I
would like. When a camera pans a room in one of my TV captures, it kind
of stutters a bit (a little jerky). I've tried every imaginable
combination of recording parameters, so I've concluded I just don't have
the muscle for a perfect capture. My ESC K7VZA is 4x rated, but I can
only get 2x.

Thanks.

Dion L Heap
July 5th 03, 03:53 PM
"SST" > wrote in message
et...
> First time I posted these patriotic postings I did so because the majority
> of the posters are American. I didn't do anything more then post the
words.
> No commentary. Just a simple 'Happy Birthday' - take it for what its
worth.
> Read it if you want to or pass it by. Your choice.
>
> If anyone was to reply, I thought it would be about the text. Boy was I
> wrong! It immediately drew anger and backlash. I though, why? So I
repeated
> it each year for a few years now and each and every time it gets the same
> very negative response. Again I ask, why?

Probably for the same reason some of us are asking why you do it year in
year out, knowing it receives backlash, yet still causing mayhem due to
crossposting in totally irrelevant groups. By your own admission, you know
it causes mayhem, yet you still do it, yet you apologise for nothing! How
about apologising to those of us who have no interest in your argument, no
interest in patriotic flame wars, and who just want to talk about
overclocking, hardware or the various other groups that you post your off
topic flame catalyst into?

regards,

Dion L Heap
www.thetophouse.com

SST
July 5th 03, 04:49 PM
Simple, don't read it.



"Dion L Heap" > wrote in message
...
>
> "SST" > wrote in message
> et...
> > First time I posted these patriotic postings I did so because the
majority
> > of the posters are American. I didn't do anything more then post the
> words.
> > No commentary. Just a simple 'Happy Birthday' - take it for what its
> worth.
> > Read it if you want to or pass it by. Your choice.
> >
> > If anyone was to reply, I thought it would be about the text. Boy was I
> > wrong! It immediately drew anger and backlash. I though, why? So I
> repeated
> > it each year for a few years now and each and every time it gets the
same
> > very negative response. Again I ask, why?
>
> Probably for the same reason some of us are asking why you do it year in
> year out, knowing it receives backlash, yet still causing mayhem due to
> crossposting in totally irrelevant groups. By your own admission, you know
> it causes mayhem, yet you still do it, yet you apologise for nothing! How
> about apologising to those of us who have no interest in your argument, no
> interest in patriotic flame wars, and who just want to talk about
> overclocking, hardware or the various other groups that you post your off
> topic flame catalyst into?
>
> regards,
>
> Dion L Heap
> www.thetophouse.com
>
>

Dion L Heap
July 5th 03, 05:07 PM
"SST" > wrote in message
et...
> Simple, don't read it.
>

which is exactly what the other totally off topic, crossposting T&C
breaching spammers say, you are no better than any of the worst posters in
the thread you created!

regards,

Dion L Heap
www.thetophouse.com

Fig
July 5th 03, 05:22 PM
Are all you ppl cross posting or is it a news server ****up.


Fig



"Banjo Dolt" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> In article >,
> says...
> > I had an XP at 2400Mhz (still do actually) on an NF2 board. Benchmarks
were
> > high and game play was good.
> >
> > After switching to an all Intel machine after so many years I
immediately
> > experienced something that I didn't expect.
> >
> > The Intel machine was not only faster but MUCH smoother and more
pleasurable
> > to use. Many of my games that ran fast but were experiencing some
occasional
> > stuttering which was attributed to the video card and its drivers
completely
> > went away. So it wasn't the video card or its drivers but rather the
systems
> > chipset all along.
> >
>
> Would stepping up from my XP1700 to a Celeron 2.4gig be enough to smooth
> out my SVCD captures? I just picked up an 8500DV...and while I'm
> pleased with the product, the SVCD captures have not been as smooth as I
> would like. When a camera pans a room in one of my TV captures, it kind
> of stutters a bit (a little jerky). I've tried every imaginable
> combination of recording parameters, so I've concluded I just don't have
> the muscle for a perfect capture. My ESC K7VZA is 4x rated, but I can
> only get 2x.
>
> Thanks.

Minotaur
July 5th 03, 05:43 PM
Simple, post in the appropriate usenet group.

Fig
July 5th 03, 05:50 PM
Well said brudda lol


Fig


"Dion L Heap" > wrote in message
...
>
> "SST" > wrote in message
> et...
> > First time I posted these patriotic postings I did so because the
majority
> > of the posters are American. I didn't do anything more then post the
> words.
> > No commentary. Just a simple 'Happy Birthday' - take it for what its
> worth.
> > Read it if you want to or pass it by. Your choice.
> >
> > If anyone was to reply, I thought it would be about the text. Boy was I
> > wrong! It immediately drew anger and backlash. I though, why? So I
> repeated
> > it each year for a few years now and each and every time it gets the
same
> > very negative response. Again I ask, why?
>
> Probably for the same reason some of us are asking why you do it year in
> year out, knowing it receives backlash, yet still causing mayhem due to
> crossposting in totally irrelevant groups. By your own admission, you know
> it causes mayhem, yet you still do it, yet you apologise for nothing! How
> about apologising to those of us who have no interest in your argument, no
> interest in patriotic flame wars, and who just want to talk about
> overclocking, hardware or the various other groups that you post your off
> topic flame catalyst into?
>
> regards,
>
> Dion L Heap
> www.thetophouse.com
>
>

Arthur Hagen
July 5th 03, 05:54 PM
"SST" > wrote in message
et...
> First time I posted these patriotic postings I did so because the majority
> of the posters are American. I didn't do anything more then post the
words.
> No commentary. Just a simple 'Happy Birthday' - take it for what its
worth.
> Read it if you want to or pass it by. Your choice.
>
> If anyone was to reply, I thought it would be about the text. Boy was I
> wrong! It immediately drew anger and backlash. I though, why? So I
repeated
> it each year for a few years now and each and every time it gets the same
> very negative response. Again I ask, why?

That's a very good question that the US needs to ask itself and contemplate.
Just *why* do so many people hate us? Really, *why*? Jealousy doesn't cut
it, as the loathing appears to come from countries with a higher standard of
living too, and isn't directed at other rich countries. So, what's unique
about us that makes others hate us so much, and not, say, hate Sweden and
Canada?
Some deep retrospective thought might be useful, if this is to change.

Regards,
--
*Art

Dave
July 5th 03, 06:21 PM
"SST" > wrote in message
et...
> First time I posted these patriotic postings I did so because the majority
> of the posters are American. I didn't do anything more then post the
words.
> No commentary. Just a simple 'Happy Birthday' - take it for what its
worth.
> Read it if you want to or pass it by. Your choice.

Bull****. Guess the "Happy Gilmore" audio clip went right over your head.
Figures. You did it for some sort of perverse satisfaction witnessing the
knee-jerk reaction. You are far too transparent. You aren't even a GOOD BS
artist. My keyboard player was better... here are your true motives in your
own words...see how easily you hang yourself?

"Well Dave you're partly right.

I have been posting these two great doctrine for about 4 or 5 years now just
for fun."

and:

"I do this every year and it always draws the maggots to the surface.

Smile for the camera!"

and:

"I did.

I love to see all the non-Americans come out in protest of a little
patriotism. its funny as hell and sad at the same time.

Keep it coming!"

You type this before or after the Paxil? So was this you or your evil twin?
Now do you remember me? Wouldn't be surprised if you didn't. This might have
something to do with it...here's a little handy cut'n'paste from the ol'
"sent items" folder:

--------------------------------------------------------

"Too bad, you missed out on some good old fashion fun. Smoking a little pot
and popping a few pills is part of life, get used to it. If the man made
laws said it was ok to do these things would it have been ok with you then?"

That come out of you? Classic lines! Hope your kids aren't reading this or
do they smoke it with you? Another gem:

"Na, I smoke it everyday and I'm not addicted!"

That come out of you too? This very group? Pot, meet kettle! Try not smoking
it every day, meathead, and see what happens! I think you got some
'splainin' to do!

Mood swings indicative of addictive personality: A little earlier:

"I suggest you return the card because you are too stupid to own it."

Could this be the same person who x-posted this:

"You must be speaking of humans because Jesus Christ was a peaceful man full
of love and forgiveness.

Man is an evil being and reigns with terror and hate; fire, ice and wind -
whatever...(bla bla ****ing bla)"

....to alt.auto.mercedes and alt.feminism? Or was it your evil twin? Why are
you crossposting to those two? Do I really want to know?
----------------------------------------------------------

I think you're still recovering from the last time a thought struck you. I
certainly remember you...

"Point is that I'm looking at the scores and thinking how my CPU beats
everyone if his scores by a large margin!"

Clear-cut evidence of performance anxieties...

> If anyone was to reply, I thought it would be about the text. Boy was I
> wrong! It immediately drew anger and backlash. I though, why? So I
repeated
> it each year for a few years now and each and every time it gets the same
> very negative response. Again I ask, why?

Gee, I wonder...is this a rhetorical question? Must be...

> Forget about off topic rhetoric. These usenet get hammered with SPAM about
> penis enlargement to buying diplomas. Its just an excuse to yell out so I
> disregard the comments.

Do you? Interesting...

> If a Brit or a Frank had done so on their countries patriotic holiday, I
> doubt gangs of Americans would have came out and posted hate and
> defilements. I really believe that.

Probably not. But you knew this before you posted this so what's your point?

> There were actually just seven direct replies. (maybe more)
> 1- Kai Robinson calling the document 'crap'

I think he was referring to the motives of its poster, or perhaps the poster
itself?

> 2- HamMan calling it 'patriotic garbage'
> 3- TheSingingCat calling it 'a bunch of useless stuff'

Like that should even be a blip on the ol' radar?

> 4- Thor stating that most americans are stupid

Yeah, YOU sure showed him otherwise! A foine representative of the mindset
of our nation you are...wotwot? Put it this way, if all foreigners had to go
by as a representative of our country was you, no wonder they think we're
schtoopid...

> 5- Martin Eriksson 'Well just wait until I post the Swedish "constitution"
> on our national day.' (which I did already)

Your consideration has been duly noted and appreciated...;-P

> 6-Fig says 'ALLLLLLLL you yanks hav fonny name' (funny)
> 7-Allan Laws comment; 'Why would anyone celebrate the birth of the biggest
> pack of arseholes on the
> planet.'

I think you can effectively account for at least three...

And you naturally disregarded these comments...of course you did!

> All comments were from non-Americans and all were completely unnecessary
and
> filled with hate except for Fig he just pointed out the funny names, which
> were British BTW.

Somehow the thought of you calling something unnecessary strikes me as being
rather amusing. I wonder why that is?

> Most of you put together pieces to create some demented Picasso of what
you
> perceive as reality.

Ok, there, Sigmund...as if you were exempt from any sort of cubist view of
life. You can't even keep your own lies straight. Must be the short-term
memory going...so, who are you today? I think you must be bipolar...

You judge others on distorted facts and lack of
> information. Most are quick to throw stones but we forget that we all live
> in glass houses.

I think most of us have you pretty well figured out by now. Doesn't take too
much wattage to understand your particular brand of pathology...

> There was nothing wrong with my posting. It was the replies that were
wrong.

Alrighty there, Happy Gilmore...

> I appoligize for nothing!

Hmm, some classics coming from you: "All I did was..." "YOU..." Yeah, yeah,
yeah. Whatever. All one has to do to understand who you really are is look
up your history on Deja News (and be prepared to wade thru several
nymshifts, and some of the most pathetic, abusive cack ever spewed on
Usenet) Some pretty interesting stuff there. Crossposting to
alt.auto.mercedes and alt.feminism too? Some pretty choice material there,
me boyo. What a foine case-study you are, meladdie! I have you pegged. No
amount of squirming will change that. Oh I can see it now: "What are you
talking about you freak!, blablabla." You need a life. I hear they're on
sale at Wal-Mart, butcha bettah hurry, or you'll get all the returned
misfits...still you'd be better off than you are now...

So what happened to "So how was your 4th? I'm traveling to the countryside
tomorrow, my family
> owns a home up in the Adirondacks".

Oh, you're on a laptop with the same IP? Shouldn't you be packing and
helping the wife and kids get ready? All you have effectively demonstrated
to EVERYONE is what a sad waste of a life you are, as if it weren't obvious
long ago...well lunch break is over, back to my work, it's been fun rubbing
your nose in your own culottes salies, but sadly I must go...(NOT!). I think
that lithium bottle is calling you now, so I'll let you go...just remember,
we're not laughing WITH you...

Dave
July 5th 03, 06:22 PM
"Fig" > wrote in message
...
> Are all you ppl cross posting or is it a news server ****up.
>
> Fig

Correction: are all WE people crossposting...

Dave
July 5th 03, 07:06 PM
"Arthur Hagen" > wrote in message
...


(first part of typical SST BS snipped)

> > If anyone was to reply, I thought it would be about the text. Boy was I
> > wrong! It immediately drew anger and backlash. I though, why? So I
> repeated
> > it each year for a few years now and each and every time it gets the
same
> > very negative response. Again I ask, why?
>
> That's a very good question that the US needs to ask itself and
contemplate.
> Just *why* do so many people hate us? Really, *why*?

Because the world is full of stupid, ignorant, prejudiced people that can't
see beyond the end of the party-line rhetoric crammed up their noses? I give
up...

Jealousy doesn't cut
> it, as the loathing appears to come from countries with a higher standard
of
> living too, and isn't directed at other rich countries. So, what's unique
> about us that makes others hate us so much, and not, say, hate Sweden and
> Canada?

We are the world's biggest scapegoat and nose-wiper? Our generally better
standard of living despite the lack of socialism makes us an easy target?
Your media fills you with anti-American tripe and you swallow it hook, line,
and sinker (see my first statement above) because everyone needs SOMEONE to
point the finger at? That it? Am I getting warmer? What's to hate about
Sweden? As for Canada, well, let's not mention Jim Carrey or Alanis
More-A-Slut, shall we? I think Americans and Canadians hate each other more
during hockey season anyway...;-) Americans hate Canadians because the beer
is generally better and the average Archie Bunker is all too loath to admit
it, and Canadians hate Americans because all their talent keeps emigrating
here...;-)

> Some deep retrospective thought might be useful, if this is to change.

So, for the benefit of we stupid, hated Americans here, please feel free to
enlighten us with your pearls of wisdom. I still don't get it. If anyone
hates our country as a whole due to some of the actions of our crooked
leaders (certainly no different anywhere else), perhaps they can be content
to wallow in their unwashed ignorance and we can just leave it at that,
mmkay? Just don't bitch when we cut foreign aid...

Proconsul
July 5th 03, 08:04 PM
I've been in 65 countries over the years and the novel notion that everyone
"hates" the USA is nonsense.....

The political elite in many countries, i.e., "The Left", coupled with a
politically corrupted media would have you believe it to be so, but in
reality, it isn't so....

I've interacted with people on every continent, except Antarctica, and the
admiration and respect for the USA is virtually universal - witness the
droves of people who endure any hardship merely to find their way to the USA
so that they can live a better life. I don't see "hordes" of American
standing in line to emigrate to Canada, Holland, Russia, Italy, France or
anywhere else - indeed, why would they?

PC

"Arthur Hagen" > wrote in message
...
|
| "SST" > wrote in message
| et...
| > First time I posted these patriotic postings I did so because the
majority
| > of the posters are American. I didn't do anything more then post the
| words.
| > No commentary. Just a simple 'Happy Birthday' - take it for what its
| worth.
| > Read it if you want to or pass it by. Your choice.
| >
| > If anyone was to reply, I thought it would be about the text. Boy was I
| > wrong! It immediately drew anger and backlash. I though, why? So I
| repeated
| > it each year for a few years now and each and every time it gets the
same
| > very negative response. Again I ask, why?
|
| That's a very good question that the US needs to ask itself and
contemplate.
| Just *why* do so many people hate us? Really, *why*? Jealousy doesn't
cut
| it, as the loathing appears to come from countries with a higher standard
of
| living too, and isn't directed at other rich countries. So, what's unique
| about us that makes others hate us so much, and not, say, hate Sweden and
| Canada?
| Some deep retrospective thought might be useful, if this is to change.
|
| Regards,
| --
| *Art
|

Anybody®
July 5th 03, 08:22 PM
Oh that was beautiful LOL
"Dave" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "SST" > wrote in message
> et...
> > First time I posted these patriotic postings I did so because the
majority
> > of the posters are American. I didn't do anything more then post the
> words.
> > No commentary. Just a simple 'Happy Birthday' - take it for what its
> worth.
> > Read it if you want to or pass it by. Your choice.
>
> Bull****. Guess the "Happy Gilmore" audio clip went right over your head.
> Figures. You did it for some sort of perverse satisfaction witnessing the
> knee-jerk reaction. You are far too transparent. You aren't even a GOOD BS
> artist. My keyboard player was better... here are your true motives in
your
> own words...see how easily you hang yourself?
>
> "Well Dave you're partly right.
>
> I have been posting these two great doctrine for about 4 or 5 years now
just
> for fun."
>
> and:
>
> "I do this every year and it always draws the maggots to the surface.
>
> Smile for the camera!"
>
> and:
>
> "I did.
>
> I love to see all the non-Americans come out in protest of a little
> patriotism. its funny as hell and sad at the same time.
>
> Keep it coming!"
>
> You type this before or after the Paxil? So was this you or your evil
twin?
> Now do you remember me? Wouldn't be surprised if you didn't. This might
have
> something to do with it...here's a little handy cut'n'paste from the ol'
> "sent items" folder:
>
> --------------------------------------------------------
>
> "Too bad, you missed out on some good old fashion fun. Smoking a little
pot
> and popping a few pills is part of life, get used to it. If the man made
> laws said it was ok to do these things would it have been ok with you
then?"
>
> That come out of you? Classic lines! Hope your kids aren't reading this or
> do they smoke it with you? Another gem:
>
> "Na, I smoke it everyday and I'm not addicted!"
>
> That come out of you too? This very group? Pot, meet kettle! Try not
smoking
> it every day, meathead, and see what happens! I think you got some
> 'splainin' to do!
>
> Mood swings indicative of addictive personality: A little earlier:
>
> "I suggest you return the card because you are too stupid to own it."
>
> Could this be the same person who x-posted this:
>
> "You must be speaking of humans because Jesus Christ was a peaceful man
full
> of love and forgiveness.
>
> Man is an evil being and reigns with terror and hate; fire, ice and wind -
> whatever...(bla bla ****ing bla)"
>
> ...to alt.auto.mercedes and alt.feminism? Or was it your evil twin? Why
are
> you crossposting to those two? Do I really want to know?
> ----------------------------------------------------------
>
> I think you're still recovering from the last time a thought struck you. I
> certainly remember you...
>
> "Point is that I'm looking at the scores and thinking how my CPU beats
> everyone if his scores by a large margin!"
>
> Clear-cut evidence of performance anxieties...
>
> > If anyone was to reply, I thought it would be about the text. Boy was I
> > wrong! It immediately drew anger and backlash. I though, why? So I
> repeated
> > it each year for a few years now and each and every time it gets the
same
> > very negative response. Again I ask, why?
>
> Gee, I wonder...is this a rhetorical question? Must be...
>
> > Forget about off topic rhetoric. These usenet get hammered with SPAM
about
> > penis enlargement to buying diplomas. Its just an excuse to yell out so
I
> > disregard the comments.
>
> Do you? Interesting...
>
> > If a Brit or a Frank had done so on their countries patriotic holiday, I
> > doubt gangs of Americans would have came out and posted hate and
> > defilements. I really believe that.
>
> Probably not. But you knew this before you posted this so what's your
point?
>
> > There were actually just seven direct replies. (maybe more)
> > 1- Kai Robinson calling the document 'crap'
>
> I think he was referring to the motives of its poster, or perhaps the
poster
> itself?
>
> > 2- HamMan calling it 'patriotic garbage'
> > 3- TheSingingCat calling it 'a bunch of useless stuff'
>
> Like that should even be a blip on the ol' radar?
>
> > 4- Thor stating that most americans are stupid
>
> Yeah, YOU sure showed him otherwise! A foine representative of the mindset
> of our nation you are...wotwot? Put it this way, if all foreigners had to
go
> by as a representative of our country was you, no wonder they think we're
> schtoopid...
>
> > 5- Martin Eriksson 'Well just wait until I post the Swedish
"constitution"
> > on our national day.' (which I did already)
>
> Your consideration has been duly noted and appreciated...;-P
>
> > 6-Fig says 'ALLLLLLLL you yanks hav fonny name' (funny)
> > 7-Allan Laws comment; 'Why would anyone celebrate the birth of the
biggest
> > pack of arseholes on the
> > planet.'
>
> I think you can effectively account for at least three...
>
> And you naturally disregarded these comments...of course you did!
>
> > All comments were from non-Americans and all were completely unnecessary
> and
> > filled with hate except for Fig he just pointed out the funny names,
which
> > were British BTW.
>
> Somehow the thought of you calling something unnecessary strikes me as
being
> rather amusing. I wonder why that is?
>
> > Most of you put together pieces to create some demented Picasso of what
> you
> > perceive as reality.
>
> Ok, there, Sigmund...as if you were exempt from any sort of cubist view of
> life. You can't even keep your own lies straight. Must be the short-term
> memory going...so, who are you today? I think you must be bipolar...
>
> You judge others on distorted facts and lack of
> > information. Most are quick to throw stones but we forget that we all
live
> > in glass houses.
>
> I think most of us have you pretty well figured out by now. Doesn't take
too
> much wattage to understand your particular brand of pathology...
>
> > There was nothing wrong with my posting. It was the replies that were
> wrong.
>
> Alrighty there, Happy Gilmore...
>
> > I appoligize for nothing!
>
> Hmm, some classics coming from you: "All I did was..." "YOU..." Yeah,
yeah,
> yeah. Whatever. All one has to do to understand who you really are is look
> up your history on Deja News (and be prepared to wade thru several
> nymshifts, and some of the most pathetic, abusive cack ever spewed on
> Usenet) Some pretty interesting stuff there. Crossposting to
> alt.auto.mercedes and alt.feminism too? Some pretty choice material there,
> me boyo. What a foine case-study you are, meladdie! I have you pegged. No
> amount of squirming will change that. Oh I can see it now: "What are you
> talking about you freak!, blablabla." You need a life. I hear they're on
> sale at Wal-Mart, butcha bettah hurry, or you'll get all the returned
> misfits...still you'd be better off than you are now...
>
> So what happened to "So how was your 4th? I'm traveling to the countryside
> tomorrow, my family
> > owns a home up in the Adirondacks".
>
> Oh, you're on a laptop with the same IP? Shouldn't you be packing and
> helping the wife and kids get ready? All you have effectively demonstrated
> to EVERYONE is what a sad waste of a life you are, as if it weren't
obvious
> long ago...well lunch break is over, back to my work, it's been fun
rubbing
> your nose in your own culottes salies, but sadly I must go...(NOT!). I
think
> that lithium bottle is calling you now, so I'll let you go...just
remember,
> we're not laughing WITH you...
>
>
>

Dave
July 5th 03, 08:32 PM
"Anybody®" > wrote in message
le.rogers.com...
> Oh that was beautiful LOL

http://batmandork.hypermart.net/wavs/thnkumch.wav

> "Dave" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >

http://batmandork.hypermart.net/wavs/krispies.wav

(Ye Olde Welle-Earnede Smacketh Downeth)

Thomas Andersson
July 5th 03, 08:50 PM
SST wrote:

> Simple, don't read it.

Why post something you don't want us to read? And why waste bandwidth
posting stuff that is of no relevance or importance? Sure you can ignore it
and not read it, but still (And for many you still download it, even if you
ahve no intention of reading it as it's automatic). If people wants to read
the constitution it's simple enough to find if and when you need it. Doing
as you say, posting it year after year, fully knowing what response it will
attract is pure troll bait...

Thomas Andersson
July 5th 03, 09:05 PM
Fig wrote:

> Are all you ppl cross posting or is it a news server ****up.

Sadly it started as a intentional crossposting flamebait.. and noone have
bothered to edit out all the newsgroups to reply within their own group
(Sorry, I'm doinng the same now as I don't know from where your post came).
Anyway, it's not your mailer or newssupplier that's erronious.

neopolaris
July 5th 03, 10:17 PM
"Danny" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Icarus ^i^" > wrote in message
> ...
> > SST wrote:
> > :: The Constitution of the United States:
> >
> > **** off.. this doesn't belong in this group..
> >
> >
> Or any...
>
>

Tough ****. It's the people from other countries that couldn't handle it.
What a bunch of crybabys.

line them up...

neopolaris
July 5th 03, 10:52 PM
Your wrong ALOT aren't you. I guess you must get used to it after a while.
loser...
"Anybody®" > wrote in message
le.rogers.com...
> you are a sad sad person
> "neopolaris" <.> wrote in message
...
> >
> > "Danny" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > >
> > > "Icarus ^i^" > wrote in message
> > > ...
> > > > SST wrote:
> > > > :: The Constitution of the United States:
> > > >
> > > > **** off.. this doesn't belong in this group..
> > > >
> > > >
> > > Or any...
> > >
> > >
> >
> > Tough ****. It's the people from other countries that couldn't handle
it.
> > What a bunch of crybabys.
> >
> > line them up...
> >
> >
>
>

Thomas Andersson
July 5th 03, 10:57 PM
neopolaris wrote:

> Tough ****. It's the people from other countries that couldn't
> handle it. What a bunch of crybabys.

Quite a few that have taken part in the discussion as against the post have
been Americans themself. Why are everyone that didn't like the post
Anti-Americans or socialists?

> line them up...

So that's your solution? Either we fully support your every wim or we're
dead?

Anybody®
July 5th 03, 10:58 PM
I admit when I am wrong, which in my opinion of you I am not.
Can you do the same..................
"neopolaris" <.> wrote in message ...
> Your wrong ALOT aren't you. I guess you must get used to it after a
while.
> loser...
> "Anybody®" > wrote in message
> le.rogers.com...
> > you are a sad sad person
> > "neopolaris" <.> wrote in message
> ...
> > >
> > > "Danny" > wrote in message
> > > ...
> > > >
> > > > "Icarus ^i^" > wrote in message
> > > > ...
> > > > > SST wrote:
> > > > > :: The Constitution of the United States:
> > > > >
> > > > > **** off.. this doesn't belong in this group..
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > Or any...
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > > Tough ****. It's the people from other countries that couldn't handle
> it.
> > > What a bunch of crybabys.
> > >
> > > line them up...
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>

neopolaris
July 6th 03, 01:50 AM
FYI: Socialism IS anti-American. I am neither. The line them up part was
a joke. The rest is fact. People from elsewhere were offended by the
original post. The liberals came out later to play.
It's the same old story. Vote, lose, bitch.
For those poor misdirected souls who actually believe the US is invading the
world-we aren't. Sleep cozy in your beds tonight. GB is only after
terrorists.
"Thomas Andersson" > wrote in message
...
> neopolaris wrote:
>
> > Tough ****. It's the people from other countries that couldn't
> > handle it. What a bunch of crybabys.
>
> Quite a few that have taken part in the discussion as against the post
have
> been Americans themself. Why are everyone that didn't like the post
> Anti-Americans or socialists?
>
> > line them up...
>
> So that's your solution? Either we fully support your every wim or we're
> dead?
>
>
>

Thomas Andersson
July 6th 03, 12:36 PM
neopolaris wrote:

> FYI: Socialism IS anti-American. I am neither. The line them up

Realy, how so? Would you considder Sweden a Anti-American or dangerous,
hostile (in any way) nation?

> part was a joke. The rest is fact. People from elsewhere were
> offended by the original post. The liberals came out later to play.

True, but not all becouse of the patriotic content, many just becouse it's
off-topic and inapropriate content.. When the heat rised with the replies
things got ugly fast though. I considder myself pro-American, but that
doesn't mean I always agree with everything about it or the attitude or over
zealous attitude of some Americans.

> It's the same old story. Vote, lose, bitch.
> For those poor misdirected souls who actually believe the US is
> invading the world-we aren't. Sleep cozy in your beds tonight. GB
> is only after terrorists.

AND oil! If it were ONLY the terrorists they were after they ahve failed
misserably as the leaders are still free as are many of the trainers and
terrorists themself. By Removing Saddam from power USa have done the Iraki
people and the world a favour, but staying there and controlling the country
isn't helping anyone though and is likely to aggravate people (especially
the Arab world) more and more.

Best Wishes
Thomas

Marcus Andersson
July 7th 03, 06:50 AM
"neopolaris" <.> wrote in message >...
> FYI: Socialism IS anti-American.


I guess that explains why the U.S. is one of the most socialistic
countries in the world?

Ed Light
July 7th 03, 07:00 AM
Socialism - not implemented in any country so far - the democratic control
of production and distribution of goods and services by the people.

It's not state run industries, an oligarchy of elites, or whatever.
--
Ed Light

Smiley :-/
MS Smiley :-\

Sunny
July 7th 03, 07:02 AM
Bull**** :
(Socialist, one who has nothing and wants to share it)
1 : any of various economic and political theories advocating collective or
governmental ownership and administration of the means of production and
distribution of goods
2 a : a system of society or group living in which there is no private
property
b : a system or condition of society in which the means of production are
owned and controlled by the state
3 : a stage of society in Marxist theory transitional between capitalism and
communism and distinguished by unequal distribution of goods and pay
according to work done

"Marcus Andersson" > wrote in message
m...
> "neopolaris" <.> wrote in message
>...
> > FYI: Socialism IS anti-American.
>
>
> I guess that explains why the U.S. is one of the most socialistic
> countries in the world?

WooduCoodu
July 7th 03, 07:56 AM
Well, I live in the US and I think you should either limit it to appropriate
groups or stop posting this stuff.

Marcus Andersson
July 8th 03, 06:23 AM
"Sunny" > wrote in message >...


> collective or
> governmental ownership and administration of the means of production and
> distribution of goods


<snip>

The above is quite an accurate description of the US, isn't it?

Sunny
July 8th 03, 06:53 AM
"Marcus Andersson" > wrote in message
om...
> "Sunny" > wrote in message
>...
>
>
> > collective or
> > governmental ownership and administration of the means of production and
> > distribution of goods
>
>
> <snip>
>
> The above is quite an accurate description of the US, isn't it?

Ever studied "The Rule of Holes"? Keep digging

Madra Rua
July 13th 03, 06:03 AM
Agreed Woodu.

The Republicans are pushing this as hard as they can, with an election
coming next year. I read here in central CA that the Feds offered some
cities financial help with their 4 July celebrations, if they had a strong
Iraq theme. Disgusting vermin !!!!!!!!!! Their souls were sold long ago.

Rua


"WooduCoodu" > wrote in message
...
> Well, I live in the US and I think you should either limit it to
appropriate
> groups or stop posting this stuff.
>
>
>

Darthy
July 21st 03, 12:40 PM
On Sat, 5 Jul 2003 01:06:02 +0100, "Michael Robertson"
> wrote:

>merkins!!! coulnt eat a whole one.But the iraq's seem to be doing a good job
>by the way you merkins found any WMD's yet!!!

Please don't insult Americans about the WMD....

Point your finger at the man at the top, please... for making up the
story.... just like your own PM, Blair... :)




--
Remember when real men used Real computers!?
When 512K of video RAM was a lot!

Death to Palladium & WPA!!

J.D.
August 6th 03, 07:20 AM
Yeah, cut foreign aid. That's it. Wouldn't the tune change then. Oh,
and by the way, the french should bathe more. I can't get within 20
feet of them. We should have let the Nazis take their snooty nose
attitude, too.

So go **** youself, Pierre.

Another Patriotic American who can think for himself.

J.D.
August 6th 03, 07:23 AM
Well said.

DJ
August 6th 03, 03:42 PM
Quite right you could be nice and insular the Germans would have been first
in space had the first atom bomb and they may well have let the Japs have
one as well. after all the Americans took werner von Braun and conveniently
forgot his war crimes just to get his missile technology the only country
that really loves the USA is the USA and your aid hungry friend Israel
America is great if you are wealthy I lived there for a coupla years!
"J.D." > wrote in message
...
> Well said.

h2so4
August 7th 03, 10:11 AM
Oscar Wilde said of America that it was the only country to have gone from
barbarity to decadence without an intervening period of civilisation.
Personally, I've always regarded Wilde's judgement to be a trifle harsh as I
have several American friends who are quite civilised..

Frank Hagan
August 7th 03, 12:56 PM
"h2so4" > wrote in message
...
> Oscar Wilde said of America that it was the only country to have gone from
> barbarity to decadence without an intervening period of civilization.
> Personally, I've always regarded Wilde's judgment to be a trifle harsh as
I
> have several American friends who are quite civilized..
>
>
Of course Oscar was a "person of an alternate lifestyle" (How's that for PC)
who lived in (GASP) England and died at a relatively early age from
dissolute living. When speaking of America I prefer to quote Winston
Churchill who said, "England and America are two countries separated by a
common language" That was a perceptive gentleman with a very dry sense of
humor. We could use more like him today. Just my two cents or pence worth.

FRH

Nick Hogg
August 7th 03, 05:05 PM
nice. and here's one from Mark Twain:

"The average American may not know who his grandfather was. But the American
was, however, one degree better off than the average Frenchman who, as a
rule, was in considerable doubt as to who his father was."