PDA

View Full Version : GA-8KNXP w/o NB Cooler


Alain Barthe
August 31st 03, 07:37 PM
Since about a week the NB cooler in my GA-8KNXP has a problem:
Whenever I turn on the system he make a loud noise for about
5 seconds and then becomes "silent" again. Obviously its broken
and I have read that this is not uncommon with Gigabyte NB
coolers.

Now I'm pondering my options and I have to admit that I really
would like to avoid to disassemble the whole system (to replace
the whole cooler with a Zalman for example).

By far the easiest fix would be to just unplug it and switch to
passive cooling. The Gigabyte headsink is quite big and the CPU
cooler (a Zalman CNPS7000-AlCu) produces some airflow right onto
the NB.

Did anybody do this? Any ideas if this would work? What are the
chances to fry the NB?

Tim
September 1st 03, 12:33 PM
I use exactly what you are proposing for the exactly same reason (passive
with Zalman CNPS7000-AlCu).
Without the fan, the n/b barely gets warm to the digital thermometer
(finger).

Ironically I bought a zalman passive to put in its place, and have not
installed it yet.

IE Yes it works.

- Tim


"Alain Barthe" > wrote in message
...
> Since about a week the NB cooler in my GA-8KNXP has a problem:
> Whenever I turn on the system he make a loud noise for about
> 5 seconds and then becomes "silent" again. Obviously its broken
> and I have read that this is not uncommon with Gigabyte NB
> coolers.
>
> Now I'm pondering my options and I have to admit that I really
> would like to avoid to disassemble the whole system (to replace
> the whole cooler with a Zalman for example).
>
> By far the easiest fix would be to just unplug it and switch to
> passive cooling. The Gigabyte headsink is quite big and the CPU
> cooler (a Zalman CNPS7000-AlCu) produces some airflow right onto
> the NB.
>
> Did anybody do this? Any ideas if this would work? What are the
> chances to fry the NB?
>
>

Bob Davis
September 1st 03, 09:49 PM
I've also been getting sporadic noises just as Alain described, only when
first booted cold but not every time. I haven't isolated the noise to the
NB fan, but it is my #1 suspect since every other fan in the box is a
ball-bearing type and new. I have a Zalman CNPS7000-Cu on the CPU now, so
you're saying the Zalman will sufficiently cool the NB using only the HS?
Is the NB fan removed by simply removing the four Phillips screws and
lifting it off? Does anyone make a replacement fan of better quality (i.e.,
ball-bearing)?



"Tim" > wrote in message ...
> I use exactly what you are proposing for the exactly same reason (passive
> with Zalman CNPS7000-AlCu).
> Without the fan, the n/b barely gets warm to the digital thermometer
> (finger).
>
> Ironically I bought a zalman passive to put in its place, and have not
> installed it yet.
>
> IE Yes it works.
>
> - Tim
>
>
> "Alain Barthe" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Since about a week the NB cooler in my GA-8KNXP has a problem:
> > Whenever I turn on the system he make a loud noise for about
> > 5 seconds and then becomes "silent" again. Obviously its broken
> > and I have read that this is not uncommon with Gigabyte NB
> > coolers.
> >
> > Now I'm pondering my options and I have to admit that I really
> > would like to avoid to disassemble the whole system (to replace
> > the whole cooler with a Zalman for example).
> >
> > By far the easiest fix would be to just unplug it and switch to
> > passive cooling. The Gigabyte headsink is quite big and the CPU
> > cooler (a Zalman CNPS7000-AlCu) produces some airflow right onto
> > the NB.
> >
> > Did anybody do this? Any ideas if this would work? What are the
> > chances to fry the NB?
> >
> >
>
>

Tim
September 1st 03, 11:13 PM
Hi Bob,

NB Sporadic Noises at startup: Yip, nice looking fan, but they are obviously
crap.
I unplugged the NB Fan, took a thermaltake digital heat sensor and stuck it
to the side of the n/b (also used finger) to check the temp. It was only
ever a few degrees above ambient. I did not stress test it, so *please* come
to your own conclusions - My CPU seems to wrong oddly cool, everything is
cool, but then I suspect this is good luck, or good application of thermal
paste on the zalman CPU cooler.

The air emanating from the zalman CNPS... no doubt helps, but the n/b seems
to run so cool that I doubt you would have a problem with heat at all with
any other type of HSF. I noted that some manufacturers with canterwood use a
passive only heatsink - this influenced me to try.

I didn't / haven't yet removed the fan from the n/b heatsink - don't see the
point.
The fans do generally just lift off as you describe.
As mentioned I purchased a zalman passive n/b heatsink to install
(ZM-NB32J), but did not install it yet as the n/b runs so cool and I would
have to pull out the mobo to install it.

Does anyone make a replacement fan of better quality (i.e., ball-bearing)?
My own opinion is that any fan you can find will be of a better quality than
the one that came with the mobo :) But thats not your questions is it? Dunno
in other words.

- Tim






"Bob Davis" > wrote in message
...
> I've also been getting sporadic noises just as Alain described, only when
> first booted cold but not every time. I haven't isolated the noise to the
> NB fan, but it is my #1 suspect since every other fan in the box is a
> ball-bearing type and new. I have a Zalman CNPS7000-Cu on the CPU now, so
> you're saying the Zalman will sufficiently cool the NB using only the HS?
> Is the NB fan removed by simply removing the four Phillips screws and
> lifting it off? Does anyone make a replacement fan of better quality
(i.e.,
> ball-bearing)?
>
>
>
> "Tim" > wrote in message
...
> > I use exactly what you are proposing for the exactly same reason
(passive
> > with Zalman CNPS7000-AlCu).
> > Without the fan, the n/b barely gets warm to the digital thermometer
> > (finger).
> >
> > Ironically I bought a zalman passive to put in its place, and have not
> > installed it yet.
> >
> > IE Yes it works.
> >
> > - Tim
> >
> >
> > "Alain Barthe" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > Since about a week the NB cooler in my GA-8KNXP has a problem:
> > > Whenever I turn on the system he make a loud noise for about
> > > 5 seconds and then becomes "silent" again. Obviously its broken
> > > and I have read that this is not uncommon with Gigabyte NB
> > > coolers.
> > >
> > > Now I'm pondering my options and I have to admit that I really
> > > would like to avoid to disassemble the whole system (to replace
> > > the whole cooler with a Zalman for example).
> > >
> > > By far the easiest fix would be to just unplug it and switch to
> > > passive cooling. The Gigabyte headsink is quite big and the CPU
> > > cooler (a Zalman CNPS7000-AlCu) produces some airflow right onto
> > > the NB.
> > >
> > > Did anybody do this? Any ideas if this would work? What are the
> > > chances to fry the NB?
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>

Bob Davis
September 2nd 03, 05:40 AM
"Tim" > wrote in message ...

> I unplugged the NB Fan, took a thermaltake digital heat sensor and stuck
it
> to the side of the n/b (also used finger) to check the temp. It was only
> ever a few degrees above ambient. I did not stress test it, so *please*
come
> to your own conclusions - My CPU seems to wrong oddly cool, everything is
> cool, but then I suspect this is good luck, or good application of thermal
> paste on the zalman CPU cooler.


It is interesting that some 875P mobos do not have NB fans. A friend has an
Asus that uses only a passive HS, so I would think that would be good enough
for mainstream--i.e., not overclocking-- applications like mine. I assume
the fan is a contingency for overclocking.


> The air emanating from the zalman CNPS... no doubt helps, but the n/b
seems
> to run so cool that I doubt you would have a problem with heat at all with
> any other type of HSF. I noted that some manufacturers with canterwood use
a
> passive only heatsink - this influenced me to try.


Looking at the setup, I would say the cooling from the Zalman would be
secondary to the normal case flow, although its proximity couldn't hurt.
There doesn't seem to be a huge amount of airflow in the vicinity of the NB
HS.


> I didn't / haven't yet removed the fan from the n/b heatsink - don't see
the
> point. The fans do generally just lift off as you describe.


I wonder if anyone makes a quality (ball-bearing) replacement, and if the GB
fan is proprietary or has a standard screw pattern that would make
replacement easy without going to GB for another crappy replacement.


> As mentioned I purchased a zalman passive n/b heatsink to install
> (ZM-NB32J), but did not install it yet as the n/b runs so cool and I would
> have to pull out the mobo to install it.


Is it so hard to replace that you must remove the mobo?


> Does anyone make a replacement fan of better quality (i.e., ball-bearing)?
> My own opinion is that any fan you can find will be of a better quality
than
> the one that came with the mobo :) But thats not your questions is it?


Yes, that's my question that needs researching, as sooner or later many of
us will need to either replace the fan or remove it entirely. I think it's
a cheap, sleeve-bearing fan that has a limited lifespan. The fact that
they're failing so early on a number of systems leads me to believe we'll
all be making that decision sooner rather than later.

Tim
September 2nd 03, 10:56 AM
You could easily remove the nb heatsink without taking the mobo out, but
this would wreck the little plastic push pins - which I might add are more
valuable than the heatsink itself - try getting replacements.

I'll put the zalman on in a few days and post back here... attach the
thermltake digital thermometer and see how it goes.

- Tim


"Bob Davis" > wrote in message
.. .
>
> "Tim" > wrote in message
...
>
> > I unplugged the NB Fan, took a thermaltake digital heat sensor and stuck
> it
> > to the side of the n/b (also used finger) to check the temp. It was only
> > ever a few degrees above ambient. I did not stress test it, so *please*
> come
> > to your own conclusions - My CPU seems to wrong oddly cool, everything
is
> > cool, but then I suspect this is good luck, or good application of
thermal
> > paste on the zalman CPU cooler.
>
>
> It is interesting that some 875P mobos do not have NB fans. A friend has
an
> Asus that uses only a passive HS, so I would think that would be good
enough
> for mainstream--i.e., not overclocking-- applications like mine. I assume
> the fan is a contingency for overclocking.
>
>
> > The air emanating from the zalman CNPS... no doubt helps, but the n/b
> seems
> > to run so cool that I doubt you would have a problem with heat at all
with
> > any other type of HSF. I noted that some manufacturers with canterwood
use
> a
> > passive only heatsink - this influenced me to try.
>
>
> Looking at the setup, I would say the cooling from the Zalman would be
> secondary to the normal case flow, although its proximity couldn't hurt.
> There doesn't seem to be a huge amount of airflow in the vicinity of the
NB
> HS.
>
>
> > I didn't / haven't yet removed the fan from the n/b heatsink - don't see
> the
> > point. The fans do generally just lift off as you describe.
>
>
> I wonder if anyone makes a quality (ball-bearing) replacement, and if the
GB
> fan is proprietary or has a standard screw pattern that would make
> replacement easy without going to GB for another crappy replacement.
>
>
> > As mentioned I purchased a zalman passive n/b heatsink to install
> > (ZM-NB32J), but did not install it yet as the n/b runs so cool and I
would
> > have to pull out the mobo to install it.
>
>
> Is it so hard to replace that you must remove the mobo?
>
>
> > Does anyone make a replacement fan of better quality (i.e.,
ball-bearing)?
> > My own opinion is that any fan you can find will be of a better quality
> than
> > the one that came with the mobo :) But thats not your questions is it?
>
>
> Yes, that's my question that needs researching, as sooner or later many of
> us will need to either replace the fan or remove it entirely. I think
it's
> a cheap, sleeve-bearing fan that has a limited lifespan. The fact that
> they're failing so early on a number of systems leads me to believe we'll
> all be making that decision sooner rather than later.
>
>
>

Dodgy
September 3rd 03, 10:55 AM
On Tue, 02 Sep 2003 04:40:59 GMT, "Bob Davis" > waffled
on about something:

>
>"Tim" > wrote in message ...
>
>> I unplugged the NB Fan, took a thermaltake digital heat sensor and stuck
>it
>> to the side of the n/b (also used finger) to check the temp. It was only
>> ever a few degrees above ambient. I did not stress test it, so *please*
>come
>> to your own conclusions - My CPU seems to wrong oddly cool, everything is
>> cool, but then I suspect this is good luck, or good application of thermal
>> paste on the zalman CPU cooler.
>
>It is interesting that some 875P mobos do not have NB fans. A friend has an
>Asus that uses only a passive HS, so I would think that would be good enough
>for mainstream--i.e., not overclocking-- applications like mine. I assume
>the fan is a contingency for overclocking.

The 875P boards I have seen with a passively cooled NB have a heatsink
the size of Wales!

>> The air emanating from the zalman CNPS... no doubt helps, but the n/b
>seems
>> to run so cool that I doubt you would have a problem with heat at all with
>> any other type of HSF. I noted that some manufacturers with canterwood use
>a
>> passive only heatsink - this influenced me to try.
>
>
>Looking at the setup, I would say the cooling from the Zalman would be
>secondary to the normal case flow, although its proximity couldn't hurt.
>There doesn't seem to be a huge amount of airflow in the vicinity of the NB
>HS.
>
>
>> I didn't / haven't yet removed the fan from the n/b heatsink - don't see
>the
>> point. The fans do generally just lift off as you describe.
>
>
>I wonder if anyone makes a quality (ball-bearing) replacement, and if the GB
>fan is proprietary or has a standard screw pattern that would make
>replacement easy without going to GB for another crappy replacement.
>
>
>> As mentioned I purchased a zalman passive n/b heatsink to install
>> (ZM-NB32J), but did not install it yet as the n/b runs so cool and I would
>> have to pull out the mobo to install it.
>
>Is it so hard to replace that you must remove the mobo?

To remove the little plastic clips that hold on the original, and to
fit the Zalman, you need to get to the underside of the board... If
your case doesn't have a hole in the "right" place on the motherboard
mounting plate, you're gonna have to pull it apart.

>> Does anyone make a replacement fan of better quality (i.e., ball-bearing)?
>> My own opinion is that any fan you can find will be of a better quality
>than
>> the one that came with the mobo :) But thats not your questions is it?
>
>Yes, that's my question that needs researching, as sooner or later many of
>us will need to either replace the fan or remove it entirely. I think it's
>a cheap, sleeve-bearing fan that has a limited lifespan. The fact that
>they're failing so early on a number of systems leads me to believe we'll
>all be making that decision sooner rather than later.

I have recently installed the Zalman CuAl cooler on my P4c-3.0, and it
has helped, although I do have circulation problems in my case, mainly
due to the PSU mounting points being upside down! Not much use having
a twin fan PSU when the one that should suck from the cpu is pointing
up in the air!

I was concerned about the tiny heatsink on the NB compared to the
un-fanned motherboards I had seen, and as I have also had some
grumblings from the fan on my ATI card (another company with a
reputation for crap fans) I have bolted a second 92mm fan onto the
side of my Zalman bracket to blow a good gale across everything.

I'm unsure about the quality of the Zalman fan... I have seen
absolutely no reference to it's bearing... Usually that means it's a
cheapy sleeve. Can anyone confirm or deny this?

Cheers

Dodgy.
--
MUSHROOMS ARE THE OPIATE OF THE MOOSES

Tim
September 4th 03, 06:54 AM
I was looking today at shots of the new Asus PC-DL I think it is called -
dual xeon with 875P. The heatsink is generous...
So if you think that's the size of Wales, then how should I describe the
NB32J? Austria or Switzerland? Its defintitely not a Vatican City...

I new two Welsh blokes in London - they both worked as brickies, and both
commuted home to Wales on Wednesdays every week to claim the dole!

- Tim




"Dodgy" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 02 Sep 2003 04:40:59 GMT, "Bob Davis" > waffled
> on about something:
>
> >
> >"Tim" > wrote in message
...
> >
> >> I unplugged the NB Fan, took a thermaltake digital heat sensor and
stuck
> >it
> >> to the side of the n/b (also used finger) to check the temp. It was
only
> >> ever a few degrees above ambient. I did not stress test it, so *please*
> >come
> >> to your own conclusions - My CPU seems to wrong oddly cool, everything
is
> >> cool, but then I suspect this is good luck, or good application of
thermal
> >> paste on the zalman CPU cooler.
> >
> >It is interesting that some 875P mobos do not have NB fans. A friend has
an
> >Asus that uses only a passive HS, so I would think that would be good
enough
> >for mainstream--i.e., not overclocking-- applications like mine. I
assume
> >the fan is a contingency for overclocking.
>
> The 875P boards I have seen with a passively cooled NB have a heatsink
> the size of Wales!
>
> >> The air emanating from the zalman CNPS... no doubt helps, but the n/b
> >seems
> >> to run so cool that I doubt you would have a problem with heat at all
with
> >> any other type of HSF. I noted that some manufacturers with canterwood
use
> >a
> >> passive only heatsink - this influenced me to try.
> >
> >
> >Looking at the setup, I would say the cooling from the Zalman would be
> >secondary to the normal case flow, although its proximity couldn't hurt.
> >There doesn't seem to be a huge amount of airflow in the vicinity of the
NB
> >HS.
> >
> >
> >> I didn't / haven't yet removed the fan from the n/b heatsink - don't
see
> >the
> >> point. The fans do generally just lift off as you describe.
> >
> >
> >I wonder if anyone makes a quality (ball-bearing) replacement, and if the
GB
> >fan is proprietary or has a standard screw pattern that would make
> >replacement easy without going to GB for another crappy replacement.
> >
> >
> >> As mentioned I purchased a zalman passive n/b heatsink to install
> >> (ZM-NB32J), but did not install it yet as the n/b runs so cool and I
would
> >> have to pull out the mobo to install it.
> >
> >Is it so hard to replace that you must remove the mobo?
>
> To remove the little plastic clips that hold on the original, and to
> fit the Zalman, you need to get to the underside of the board... If
> your case doesn't have a hole in the "right" place on the motherboard
> mounting plate, you're gonna have to pull it apart.
>
> >> Does anyone make a replacement fan of better quality (i.e.,
ball-bearing)?
> >> My own opinion is that any fan you can find will be of a better quality
> >than
> >> the one that came with the mobo :) But thats not your questions is it?
> >
> >Yes, that's my question that needs researching, as sooner or later many
of
> >us will need to either replace the fan or remove it entirely. I think
it's
> >a cheap, sleeve-bearing fan that has a limited lifespan. The fact that
> >they're failing so early on a number of systems leads me to believe we'll
> >all be making that decision sooner rather than later.
>
> I have recently installed the Zalman CuAl cooler on my P4c-3.0, and it
> has helped, although I do have circulation problems in my case, mainly
> due to the PSU mounting points being upside down! Not much use having
> a twin fan PSU when the one that should suck from the cpu is pointing
> up in the air!
>
> I was concerned about the tiny heatsink on the NB compared to the
> un-fanned motherboards I had seen, and as I have also had some
> grumblings from the fan on my ATI card (another company with a
> reputation for crap fans) I have bolted a second 92mm fan onto the
> side of my Zalman bracket to blow a good gale across everything.
>
> I'm unsure about the quality of the Zalman fan... I have seen
> absolutely no reference to it's bearing... Usually that means it's a
> cheapy sleeve. Can anyone confirm or deny this?
>
> Cheers
>
> Dodgy.
> --
> MUSHROOMS ARE THE OPIATE OF THE MOOSES

Tim
September 6th 03, 01:22 PM
Well, I put the zalman nb32j in tonight.
Don't think I'll ever do that again.
I hate the sound of ripping when you pull a heatsink off and you find it has
a thermal pad underneath.

There was a black shadow around the 875P chip which alarmed me and what
could be described as a water or grease mark. It's not from water, there has
never been water in the box. This suggests the chip has either run v hot or
the area around the chip gets discoloured under normal conditions. Does
anyone know? If not then it has been partially cooked.

I did see an AMD cpu like that once before....

It works OK. The heatsink does not get warm enough to notice. B***** of a
thing to push in - hate those push pins.

I removed the DPS at the same time since the case is a Lian Li 3060 (?) and
while it is not small it is not big and there is enough obstruction in there
even with rounded cables.

CPU is running at 34c, peaks at 46 or so now - ambient temps are higher,
`tis spring time.
Will they ever fix the other n/b temp sensor reading?

- Tim



"Bob Davis" > wrote in message
.. .
>
> "Tim" > wrote in message
...
>
> > I unplugged the NB Fan, took a thermaltake digital heat sensor and stuck
> it
> > to the side of the n/b (also used finger) to check the temp. It was only
> > ever a few degrees above ambient. I did not stress test it, so *please*
> come
> > to your own conclusions - My CPU seems to wrong oddly cool, everything
is
> > cool, but then I suspect this is good luck, or good application of
thermal
> > paste on the zalman CPU cooler.
>
>
> It is interesting that some 875P mobos do not have NB fans. A friend has
an
> Asus that uses only a passive HS, so I would think that would be good
enough
> for mainstream--i.e., not overclocking-- applications like mine. I assume
> the fan is a contingency for overclocking.
>
>
> > The air emanating from the zalman CNPS... no doubt helps, but the n/b
> seems
> > to run so cool that I doubt you would have a problem with heat at all
with
> > any other type of HSF. I noted that some manufacturers with canterwood
use
> a
> > passive only heatsink - this influenced me to try.
>
>
> Looking at the setup, I would say the cooling from the Zalman would be
> secondary to the normal case flow, although its proximity couldn't hurt.
> There doesn't seem to be a huge amount of airflow in the vicinity of the
NB
> HS.
>
>
> > I didn't / haven't yet removed the fan from the n/b heatsink - don't see
> the
> > point. The fans do generally just lift off as you describe.
>
>
> I wonder if anyone makes a quality (ball-bearing) replacement, and if the
GB
> fan is proprietary or has a standard screw pattern that would make
> replacement easy without going to GB for another crappy replacement.
>
>
> > As mentioned I purchased a zalman passive n/b heatsink to install
> > (ZM-NB32J), but did not install it yet as the n/b runs so cool and I
would
> > have to pull out the mobo to install it.
>
>
> Is it so hard to replace that you must remove the mobo?
>
>
> > Does anyone make a replacement fan of better quality (i.e.,
ball-bearing)?
> > My own opinion is that any fan you can find will be of a better quality
> than
> > the one that came with the mobo :) But thats not your questions is it?
>
>
> Yes, that's my question that needs researching, as sooner or later many of
> us will need to either replace the fan or remove it entirely. I think
it's
> a cheap, sleeve-bearing fan that has a limited lifespan. The fact that
> they're failing so early on a number of systems leads me to believe we'll
> all be making that decision sooner rather than later.
>
>
>