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View Full Version : Building PC, to floppy or not to floppy?


Scott
July 20th 03, 07:34 PM
I'm considering not putting a floppy drive in my new computer. I have a LAN
and the other computers have floppies. Anyone see a reason why I should
include one? Thanks.
-- Scott

Roy Coorne
July 20th 03, 07:50 PM
Dr Teeth a écrit:
....
> ** Amateurs built the Ark, but professionals built the Titanic.**
.................................................w ithout floppy DD:-)

I use my floppy DD often for Maxtor PowerMax, IBM DFT, memtest... and
even with the good ol' W98 boot disk!

Roy

Egil Solberg
July 20th 03, 08:12 PM
"Scott" > wrote in message
et...
> I'm considering not putting a floppy drive in my new computer. I have a
LAN
> and the other computers have floppies. Anyone see a reason why I should
> include one? Thanks.

I second the 2 above.

Additionally I can tell this:

My friend insists on not having a need for floppy and he hasn´t got one
installed.
I happen to own a spare one which I keep in my desk. My friend there and
others have to bite the apple from time to time to borrow it.
You need a floppy.

The stupidest thing I´ve heard of are those Abit mobos without serial and
PS2. What do people do if they need to access their DSL modem via management
cable?
And a normal external 56K modem cannot be used without serial.

Best to have it all installed. Costs next to nothing.

Big Daddy
July 20th 03, 08:21 PM
Scott wrote:

> I'm considering not putting a floppy drive in my new computer. I have a
> LAN
> and the other computers have floppies. Anyone see a reason why I should
> include one? Thanks.

Failsafe BIOS upgrades...

Big Daddy
July 20th 03, 08:22 PM
Scott wrote:

> I'm considering not putting a floppy drive in my new computer. I have a
> LAN
> and the other computers have floppies. Anyone see a reason why I should
> include one? Thanks.

Failsafe BIOS upgrades...

David H. Lipman
July 20th 03, 08:30 PM
Dr Teeth:

No True. there are Floppy controller based tape drives. good only for Win9x/ME
however but its worth noting.

Dave

| They are cheap and you never know when you may need one...when you
| cannot go out and buy one. Also, AFAIK, nothing else can be connected
| to the floppy connector on the motherboard.

Matt
July 20th 03, 09:08 PM
"Scott" > wrote in message
et...
> I'm considering not putting a floppy drive in my new computer. I have a
LAN
> and the other computers have floppies. Anyone see a reason why I should
> include one? Thanks.
> -- Scott

It's possible to build a PC without a floppy that is internal. Most
motherboards today support USB floppy. Thats what I use. I got Teac USB
floppy. As for PS/2 keyboard and mouse - these are all emulated through the
USB ports. You no longer need PS/2 ports. And you don't need serial ports
either as USB takes care of that. There are USB drivers for DOS that let you
take advantage of a mouse and keyboard or other USB devices. I try to avoid
DOS as much as possible. Crossing my fingers I haven't used it in the last 6
months. The onlything I need DOS is for Symantec Ghost 2003 which by the way
supports USB and firewire now. Do I use a PS/2 keyboard, mouse or serial
devices anymore? NOPE! All gone. Never had a problem. Although I keep my
USB floppy around in a bag somewhere. And it works just like an internal
floppy to boot! My .02

Matt

Matt
July 20th 03, 09:12 PM
"Matt" > wrote in message
et...
> It's possible to build a PC without a floppy that is internal. Most
> motherboards today support USB floppy. Thats what I use. I got Teac USB
> floppy. As for PS/2 keyboard and mouse - these are all emulated through
the
> USB ports. You no longer need PS/2 ports. And you don't need serial ports
> either as USB takes care of that. There are USB drivers for DOS that let
you
> take advantage of a mouse and keyboard or other USB devices. I try to
avoid
> DOS as much as possible. Crossing my fingers I haven't used it in the last
6
> months. The onlything I need DOS is for Symantec Ghost 2003 which by the
way
> supports USB and firewire now. Do I use a PS/2 keyboard, mouse or serial
> devices anymore? NOPE! All gone. Never had a problem. Although I keep my
> USB floppy around in a bag somewhere. And it works just like an internal
> floppy to boot! My .02


BTW. For a true USB solution - use a flash card reader and boot from it!
Thats what I do most of the time. The 1.44MB size of a floppy is not
important when booting with a CompactFlash card. As a matter of fact my boot
CF card is 256MB! Do you need a floppy nowadays? No.

Jeff Labute
July 20th 03, 09:42 PM
yeah..generally, you don't need a floppy... but, you'd probably feel better
having one..just in case
you need to boot off one, or make a floppy with something on it for someone
else... if you stay in your
own world..then, not much need for a floppy drive... so long as you have an
alternative boot device to
your hard disk.

jeff

"Scott" > wrote in message
et...
> I'm considering not putting a floppy drive in my new computer. I have a
LAN
> and the other computers have floppies. Anyone see a reason why I should
> include one? Thanks.
> -- Scott

RMS
July 21st 03, 12:00 AM
I agree with the "don't need". On my own computers I have barely used a
floppy in a couple of years. I do all BIOS flashes from the HD in safe mode.
Frankly, my favourite device for replacing the floppy is the USB thumb
drive. If you have a recent BIOS, you can boot from any USB mini drive as
well. Now that they are so cheap everybody should have one.

64-128MB for around 35-45 dollars CAN...
http://www.canadacomputers.com/storage.html#usb
64MB for $14.99 US, the same as a floppy!
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/Category/category_slc.asp?CatId=900

Same price, way faster, can hold 50x the data and the drive is portable. Now
that's a good argument :)

bye, Rick

"Matt" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Jeff Labute" > wrote in message
> . ca...
> > yeah..generally, you don't need a floppy... but, you'd probably feel
> better
> > having one..just in case
>
> But Oh! Do you trust floppies like you do CompactFlash cards! You
shouldn't.
> Floppies can get erased, corrupted by the slightest dirt and are generally
> unreliable. That's why I either use a boot CD or a boot CompactFlash card
> now. My data is much safer wether it be BIOS upgrades or just running
plain
> DOS. It's all on my flash card now. Floppy drives don't make me feel
better.
> They make me ****ed half the time cause some of my floppies get corrupted
> and I hate having to worry about them darn floppies.
>
>

R_Supp
July 21st 03, 12:52 AM
"Matt" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Matt" > wrote in message
> et...
> > It's possible to build a PC without a floppy that is internal. Most
> > motherboards today support USB floppy. Thats what I use. I got Teac USB
> > floppy. As for PS/2 keyboard and mouse - these are all emulated through
> the
> > USB ports. You no longer need PS/2 ports. And you don't need serial
ports
> > either as USB takes care of that. There are USB drivers for DOS that let
> you
> > take advantage of a mouse and keyboard or other USB devices. I try to
> avoid
> > DOS as much as possible. Crossing my fingers I haven't used it in the
last
> 6
> > months. The onlything I need DOS is for Symantec Ghost 2003 which by the
> way
> > supports USB and firewire now. Do I use a PS/2 keyboard, mouse or serial
> > devices anymore? NOPE! All gone. Never had a problem. Although I keep
my
> > USB floppy around in a bag somewhere. And it works just like an internal
> > floppy to boot! My .02
>
>
> BTW. For a true USB solution - use a flash card reader and boot from it!
> Thats what I do most of the time. The 1.44MB size of a floppy is not
> important when booting with a CompactFlash card. As a matter of fact my
boot
> CF card is 256MB! Do you need a floppy nowadays? No.
>
>
There are quite a few reasons that pop into my mind to have a floppy drive
installed, however, the choice is yours.
If you can afford the $15 put one in.

Snickers
July 21st 03, 05:00 AM
On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 01:21:06 GMT, jaeger > wrote:

>In article >,
says...
>> I'm considering not putting a floppy drive in my new computer. I have a LAN
>> and the other computers have floppies. Anyone see a reason why I should
>> include one? Thanks.
>> -- Scott
>
>I haven't used one in almost 4 years, there is nothing you need it for.


Wrong. There are situations where you might need it. I still have to
use mine occasionally.

Jesse
July 21st 03, 05:36 AM
On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 04:03:42 GMT, jaeger > wrote:

>> Wrong. There are situations where you might need it.
>
>Name one.

Adding 3rd party hard disk drivers or raid drivers during setup
System recovery using partition magic, nortons, others.

Doug Ramage
July 21st 03, 08:25 AM
"jaeger" > wrote in message
et...
> In article >,
> says...
>
> > Adding 3rd party hard disk drivers or raid drivers during setup
>
> You can add the drivers to a custom WinXP CD. In fact, this is the
> smart way to do it since you can add all your drivers, plus you can set
> the switches so that you don't have to babysit the install.
>
> > System recovery using partition magic, nortons, others.
>
> Partition Magic will recover from the install CD. Ghost is crap unless
> you do enterprise deployment, but the image disc itself is bootable.
>

I have PM, Drive Image, Ghost etc on a bootable cd-rom.

But I have a client who sends me her a/cs and payroll on a floppy disk. :(
--
Doug Ramage

NoRemorse
July 21st 03, 08:27 AM
"jaeger" > wrote in message
et...
> In article >,
> says...
>
> > Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my laptop to a
school
> > computer, so I can print it out.
>
> Did I miss the part where the original poster was building a laptop?

<sarcasm>Yes, you did.</sarcasm> Did I say he was building a laptop? I was
citing an example for a situation in which a floppy drive is useful. It's a
good fallback low-tech solution for certain data transfer situations.

--
NoRemorse
"Expect me when you see me."

Dave Catchpole
July 21st 03, 08:44 AM
"jaeger" > wrote in message
et...
> In article <[email protected]>,
> says...
>
> > <sarcasm>Yes, you did.</sarcasm> Did I say he was building a laptop? I
was
> > citing an example for a situation in which a floppy drive is useful.
It's a
> > good fallback low-tech solution for certain data transfer situations.
>
> Laptops are different, and not really relevant here. For a laptop that
> interfaces with a variety of systems then yes, possibly, a floppy is
> useful. But not on a desktop.

Thats crap, he's on about the fact the college Desktop only had a floppy
drive free so he could transfer his data..

Thats the relevance..

Dave

R_Supp
July 21st 03, 09:28 AM
"jaeger" > wrote in message
t...
> In article >,
> says...
>
> > Wrong. There are situations where you might need it.
>
> Name one.

It can be embarrasing to save your MYOB stuff to a USB device then have your
accountant tell you he can`t use it and in the meantime you are paying in
excess of a hundred bucks an hour for his services. Kind of makes the floppy
drive look good.

R_Supp
July 21st 03, 09:35 AM
"jaeger" > wrote in message
et...
> In article <[email protected]>,
> says...
>
> > <sarcasm>Yes, you did.</sarcasm> Did I say he was building a laptop? I
was
> > citing an example for a situation in which a floppy drive is useful.
It's a
> > good fallback low-tech solution for certain data transfer situations.
>
> Laptops are different, and not really relevant here. For a laptop that
> interfaces with a variety of systems then yes, possibly, a floppy is
> useful. But not on a desktop.

Obviously you don`t own a lappy. You don`t know what you are missing. Then
again, if you don`t leave the house you wouldn`t need a lappy.

July 21st 03, 11:04 AM
wrote:
> I'm considering not putting a floppy drive in my new computer. I have a
> LAN and the other computers have floppies. Anyone see a reason why I
> should include one? Thanks.
> -- Scott

Floppies are dirt cheap and if you don't install it you will need it, sure
as hell.

--
Asus A7N8X deluxe rev. 2.0
AMD XP 3200+, 400fsb
Corsair XMS PC 3500, 512 meg x 2, dual channel mode
ATI Radeon 9800 Pro, 256 meg DDR

Darmok
July 21st 03, 11:30 AM
On Sun, 20 Jul 2003 18:34:37 GMT, "Scott" >
wrote:

>I'm considering not putting a floppy drive in my new computer. I have a LAN
>and the other computers have floppies. Anyone see a reason why I should
>include one? Thanks.
>-- Scott

If you're going to run Windows XP, and expect to be able to make an
ASR (automated System Recovery) file set, you WILL need a floppy
drive, as that is where the data for the file set is stored. I bought
my last Dell Inspiron 8200 laptop without a floppy drive, figuring I'd
use a USB jump drive. However, there is no way to complete an ASR set
without a floppy. Fortunately, I found a modular floppy for my 8200
on eBay for $19.99 (rather than the $89 that Dell wanted!).

Cheers

bp
July 21st 03, 01:54 PM
On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 01:21:06 GMT, jaeger > wrote:

>In article >,
says...
>> I'm considering not putting a floppy drive in my new computer. I have a LAN
>> and the other computers have floppies. Anyone see a reason why I should
>> include one? Thanks.
>> -- Scott
>
>I haven't used one in almost 4 years, there is nothing you need it for.

except for installing drivers for my RAID controllers I haven't needed
one. NOw if MS would just let you load them from a CD, during the
install, I could get rid of my floppy but Noooo they insist on a
floppy

bp
July 21st 03, 01:55 PM
On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 07:16:45 GMT, jaeger > wrote:

>In article >,
>says...
>
>> Adding 3rd party hard disk drivers or raid drivers during setup
>
>You can add the drivers to a custom WinXP CD.

How please?

> In fact, this is the
>smart way to do it since you can add all your drivers, plus you can set
>the switches so that you don't have to babysit the install.
>
>> System recovery using partition magic, nortons, others.
>
>Partition Magic will recover from the install CD. Ghost is crap unless
>you do enterprise deployment, but the image disc itself is bootable.
>

bp
July 21st 03, 01:57 PM
On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 07:17:56 GMT, jaeger > wrote:

>In article >,
says...
>
>> Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my laptop to a school
>> computer, so I can print it out.
>
>Did I miss the part where the original poster was building a laptop?

here try this

Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my PC to a
school computer, so I can print it out.

bp
July 21st 03, 01:59 PM
On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 01:50:26 GMT, jaeger > wrote:

>In article >,
says...
>> Get one for sure. Only $10 and you will need it to upgrade your BIOS
>> and for other purposes.
>
>No, you do not! This is no longer 1994. Any BIOS can be flashed from a
>CDROM/RAMDRIVE. Yes, even the new Asus ones that have the .exe file.

DUDE give it up. There are reasons for a floppy.

bp
July 21st 03, 02:04 PM
On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 10:16:55 GMT, jaeger > wrote:

>In article >, says...
>
>> Floppies are dirt cheap and if you don't install it you will need it, sure
>> as hell.
>
>Why? So far not one person has offered a valid reason.

To who you?

Yes you can work around them but it can be far easier to just have it
from the start.

Dave Catchpole
July 21st 03, 02:11 PM
"Scott" > wrote in message
et...
> I'm considering not putting a floppy drive in my new computer. I have a
LAN
> and the other computers have floppies. Anyone see a reason why I should
> include one? Thanks.
> -- Scott

At the end of the day, Apple Macs haven't had a floppy drive for years now,
so I'm sure you could work around it somehow..

Dave

Snickers
July 21st 03, 03:02 PM
On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 04:03:42 GMT, jaeger > wrote:

>In article >,
says...
>
>> Wrong. There are situations where you might need it.
>
>Name one.


There are Excel and Word files I work on at home and at my job. The
computers at work have floppy drives and no cd writing capability. I
need to have a floppy disk (and drive) to transfer these files back
and forth.

Matt
July 21st 03, 06:17 PM
"Ken Kauffman" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I had blue screens in XP that erased my flashcard in the process. This
has
> happened 3 times. Reinstalled OS and drivers took care of the bsods.
>
> ken k

What drivers? There are none required for USB in XP.
:)

bLaKeY
July 21st 03, 10:57 PM
>
> At the end of the day, Apple Macs haven't had a floppy drive for years
now,
> so I'm sure you could work around it somehow..
>
> Dave
>
>
I work in a Graphic Design studio and we had to buy an external floppy drive
for our macs.
Not everyone updates their equipment as fast as they should (or could) and
floppy disks are still used daily.
Most profitable businesses have a 7 year time period before they are due to
update.
Also most of my PC customers still use floppies (with hundreds of stickers
on top of each other so you can barely fit it in the drive :)) for small
jobs sent to us.

For a 'normal' PC user it is easier to use a floppy disk than create a Ram
disk or a bootable CD. Most people could insert a floppy disk. I could only
name possibly two people I know who could create a Ramdisk and only a few
who could create a bootable CD.

For the sake of a couple of packs of smokes, or a round of drinks an
internal floppy is very worthwhile.

Blakey

blackgold
July 22nd 03, 05:26 AM
Anything better than Ghost, either free or paying.

"jaeger" > wrote in message
et...
> In article >,
> says...
>
> > Adding 3rd party hard disk drivers or raid drivers during setup
>
> You can add the drivers to a custom WinXP CD. In fact, this is the
> smart way to do it since you can add all your drivers, plus you can set
> the switches so that you don't have to babysit the install.
>
> > System recovery using partition magic, nortons, others.
>
> Partition Magic will recover from the install CD. Ghost is crap unless
> you do enterprise deployment, but the image disc itself is bootable.
>

Ben Pope
July 22nd 03, 08:37 AM
NoRemorse wrote:
> Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my laptop to a
> school computer, so I can print it out.

Quicker over a network. If you or your school is not connected, shame on
you/them.

Ben
--
I'm not just a number. To many, I'm known as a string...

Ben Pope
July 22nd 03, 08:39 AM
R_Supp wrote:
> It can be embarrasing to save your MYOB stuff to a USB device then
> have your accountant tell you he can`t use it and in the meantime you
> are paying in excess of a hundred bucks an hour for his services.
> Kind of makes the floppy drive look good.

Kind of makes your 100 bucks an hour accountant look crap for not investing
in a 50bucks 6in1 card reader.

Ben
--
I'm not just a number. To many, I'm known as a string...

Ben Pope
July 22nd 03, 08:41 AM
jaeger wrote:
> Am I the only one here who's paying any attention? I already noted
> that interfacing with archaic machines is a unique reason, albeit one
> that has no bearing on this discussion if you go back and read the
> original post.

"I have a LAN and the other computers have floppies"

Guess you're not paying attention.

:-)

Ben
--
I'm not just a number. To many, I'm known as a string...

ELVIS2000
July 23rd 03, 01:13 AM
On Sun, 20 Jul 2003 18:34:37 GMT, "Scott" >
wrote:

>I'm considering not putting a floppy drive in my new computer. I have a LAN
>and the other computers have floppies. Anyone see a reason why I should
>include one? Thanks.
>-- Scott


Only $8 and you never know...

Roger Zoul
July 23rd 03, 02:38 AM
bp wrote:
:: On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 07:17:56 GMT, jaeger > wrote:
::
::: In article >,
::: says...
:::
:::: Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my laptop to
:::: a school computer, so I can print it out.
:::
::: Did I miss the part where the original poster was building a laptop?
::
:: here try this
::
:: Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my PC to a
:: school computer, so I can print it out.

USB thumbdrive...

Nom
July 23rd 03, 10:15 AM
"Scott" > wrote in message
et...
> I'm considering not putting a floppy drive in my new computer. I have a
LAN
> and the other computers have floppies. Anyone see a reason why I should
> include one? Thanks.

They cost £5 - why NOT include one ? You don't lose anything by having one !

Dodgy
July 23rd 03, 02:11 PM
On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 07:16:45 GMT, jaeger > waffled
on about something:

>In article >,
>says...
>
>> Adding 3rd party hard disk drivers or raid drivers during setup
>
>You can add the drivers to a custom WinXP CD. In fact, this is the
>smart way to do it since you can add all your drivers, plus you can set
>the switches so that you don't have to babysit the install.
>
>> System recovery using partition magic, nortons, others.
>
>Partition Magic will recover from the install CD. Ghost is crap unless
>you do enterprise deployment, but the image disc itself is bootable.

Fine if the floppy-less pc isn't you're only pc... But if it is you're
gonna have a few problems making that CD. :-D

I must admit I very very rarely use a floppy, but at times it's useful
for...

- Bios update
- Transferring a few files to a machine that's not on the network
(usually it's the NIC drivers I'm transferring and assuming it's not a
Intel 20meg driver package, I still can't bring myself to waste a CD
on 300K of drivers!)

Only the other night a friend asked me to help him install win2k onto
a brand new machine he was building which had a sata hard drive...
Needless to say an F6 3rd party drivers install was required and the
drivers he had on the supplied CD just didn't work... A quick download
from the net on my laptop and a floppy disk later... tada... working.
No cdr on my laptop, and I wouldn't for less that a floppies worth of
temp files anyway!

My question back to you would have to be...

Why waste a CDR on <1.4meg of files that are only going to be required
for 2 minutes and never wanted again?

Final thought - You know there's never a CDR about when you want one,
but you can always find a floppy... Usually in the box the CDROM came
in...

D0d6y.
--
MUSHROOMS ARE THE OPIATE OF THE MOOSES

Dodgy
July 23rd 03, 02:12 PM
On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 18:35:04 +1000, "R_Supp" >
waffled on about something:

>
>"jaeger" > wrote in message
et...
>> In article <[email protected]>,
>> says...
>>
>> > <sarcasm>Yes, you did.</sarcasm> Did I say he was building a laptop? I
>was
>> > citing an example for a situation in which a floppy drive is useful.
>It's a
>> > good fallback low-tech solution for certain data transfer situations.
>>
>> Laptops are different, and not really relevant here. For a laptop that
>> interfaces with a variety of systems then yes, possibly, a floppy is
>> useful. But not on a desktop.
>
>Obviously you don`t own a lappy. You don`t know what you are missing. Then
>again, if you don`t leave the house you wouldn`t need a lappy.

LMAO!

D0d6y.
--
MUSHROOMS ARE THE OPIATE OF THE MOOSES

Dodgy
July 23rd 03, 02:13 PM
On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 21:38:01 -0400, "Roger Zoul"
> waffled on about something:

>bp wrote:
>:: On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 07:17:56 GMT, jaeger > wrote:
>::
>::: In article >,
>::: says...
>:::
>:::: Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my laptop to
>:::: a school computer, so I can print it out.
>:::
>::: Did I miss the part where the original poster was building a laptop?
>::
>:: here try this
>::
>:: Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my PC to a
>:: school computer, so I can print it out.
>
>USB thumbdrive...

Unless you happen to be working with NT 4...
--
MUSHROOMS ARE THE OPIATE OF THE MOOSES

July 23rd 03, 02:16 PM
On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 21:38:01 -0400, "Roger Zoul"
> wrote:

>bp wrote:
>:: On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 07:17:56 GMT, jaeger > wrote:
>::
>::: In article >,
>::: says...
>:::
>:::: Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my laptop to
>:::: a school computer, so I can print it out.
>:::
>::: Did I miss the part where the original poster was building a laptop?
>::
>:: here try this
>::
>:: Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my PC to a
>:: school computer, so I can print it out.
>
>USB thumbdrive...
>
??
Don't buy a 10.00 floppy buy a 75.00 thumb drive and hope everyone you
deal with has USB.

yeah good one.

July 23rd 03, 02:17 PM
On Wed, 23 Jul 2003 00:20:18 +0000 (UTC),
(Bite Me) wrote:

>Also, keep in mind that you do not want to restrict yourself to only one
>means of transferring information. I'm doing this on a laptop and often
>transfer files back and forth to my desktop. For files less than a Meg I'll
>use a floppy. For files up to 128 MB's I can use the Handy stick. For files
>larger than that I can hook up a Parallel cable and use Laplink. If worse
>comes to worse and the Laptop crashes I can pull the Harddrive and use an
>adaptor to transfer all the files to the Desktop.

Have you thought about a network ? ;)

Denny Salatino
July 23rd 03, 04:00 PM
"Scott" > wrote in message >...
> I'm considering not putting a floppy drive in my new computer. I have a LAN
> and the other computers have floppies. Anyone see a reason why I should
> include one? Thanks.
> -- Scott
****
Scott, I aways keep both A and B floppies in my computers even if not
used a lot. the cost is near nothing.
I sometimes copy from one to the other for small files
or read files between them for comparing data on 2 disk's.
there are other reasons for keeping them on line and handy.
you may just wish you had put one in one day when you have a need for it.
Denny.

Tony Hwang
July 23rd 03, 08:24 PM
Hi,
FDD costs only 10.00, maybe. Even for using once, I'd rather have it.
Most PC case has a room for it and mobo has controller built-in, so
why not?
Tony

Ben Pope wrote:

> Dodgy wrote:
>
>>Final thought - You know there's never a CDR about when you want one,
>>but you can always find a floppy... Usually in the box the CDROM came
>>in...
>
>
> I tend to have the opposite problem... loads of blank CDs, but no floppies,
> mind you I tend to snap the forever corrupted floppies in half, so as not to
> waste my time attempting to use them again. It seems as though I went
> through my whole collection of floppies as they were all fscked up.
>
> Ben

Ben Pope
July 23rd 03, 10:43 PM
Tony Hwang wrote:
> Hi,
> FDD costs only 10.00, maybe. Even for using once, I'd rather have it.
> Most PC case has a room for it and mobo has controller built-in, so
> why not?
> Tony

No real reason, when I build my new machine, I'll put one in. I just hate
the damned things.

Ben
--
I'm not just a number. To many, I'm known as a string...

Ed Medlin
July 24th 03, 01:27 PM
> No real reason, when I build my new machine, I'll put one in. I just hate
> the damned things.
>
> Ben
> --
> I'm not just a number. To many, I'm known as a string...
>
>

I hate them too Ben. My new laptop is floppyless, but I have one on the
desktop so if push comes to shove I can just connect to the network and go.
I wouldn't build a system without it, although the bootable MS readers are
getting to be very appealing. My laptop is a Sony Vaio (I also use Sony
digicams) and I have heard you can set it up in bios to boot from the
built-in MS reader although I haven't tried it yet. There are just to many
instances when I would rather just have the floppy rather than go through
all the other time consuming steps to create a special cd or whatever.

Ed

MrDancer
July 24th 03, 02:21 PM
"Ben Pope" > wrote in message
...
> Tony Hwang wrote:
> > Hi,
> > FDD costs only 10.00, maybe. Even for using once, I'd rather have it.
> > Most PC case has a room for it and mobo has controller built-in, so
> > why not?
> > Tony
>
> No real reason, when I build my new machine, I'll put one in. I just hate
> the damned things.

I read on one of the tech groups a while back that Win2k may require a
floppy in some cases (during install, perhaps?).

Our company decided to get digital cameras for district offices a few years
ago, and they got the Sony floppy disk (ugh!!) cameras because they were
easier for the computer-illiterate old farts to use. After being forced to
use that digicam, I found out there is quite a difference in quality among
brands of 3.5" floppy disks (whodathunkit?). Cheap unbranded disks either
didn't work or worked extremely slowly in the digicam, whether or not you
formatted the disks. The more expensive disks worked much better.

NoRemorse
July 24th 03, 07:31 PM
"Ben Pope" > wrote in message
...
> R_Supp wrote:
> > It can be embarrasing to save your MYOB stuff to a USB device then
> > have your accountant tell you he can`t use it and in the meantime you
> > are paying in excess of a hundred bucks an hour for his services.
> > Kind of makes the floppy drive look good.
>
> Kind of makes your 100 bucks an hour accountant look crap for not
investing
> in a 50bucks 6in1 card reader.
>

How will that help with his accountant? If the accountant doesn't have USB,
he probably can't read flash cards either.

--
NoRemorse
"Expect me when you see me."

Roger Zoul
July 24th 03, 10:15 PM
wrote:
:: On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 21:38:01 -0400, "Roger Zoul"
:: > wrote:
::
::: bp wrote:
::::: On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 07:17:56 GMT, jaeger >
::::: wrote:
:::::
:::::: In article >,
:::::: says...
::::::
::::::: Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my laptop
::::::: to a school computer, so I can print it out.
::::::
:::::: Did I miss the part where the original poster was building a
:::::: laptop?
:::::
::::: here try this
:::::
::::: Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my PC to a
::::: school computer, so I can print it out.
:::
::: USB thumbdrive...
:::
:: ??
:: Don't buy a 10.00 floppy buy a 75.00 thumb drive and hope everyone
:: you deal with has USB.
::
:: yeah good one.

Nope....just the school computers....they are usually fairly
up-to-date.....no one said anything about "everyone"

Plus, a thumbdrive holds a lot more data....

b p
July 25th 03, 02:56 AM
On Thu, 24 Jul 2003 17:15:19 -0400, "Roger Zoul"
> wrote:

wrote:
>:: On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 21:38:01 -0400, "Roger Zoul"
>:: > wrote:
>::
>::: bp wrote:
>::::: On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 07:17:56 GMT, jaeger >
>::::: wrote:
>:::::
>:::::: In article >,
>:::::: says...
>::::::
>::::::: Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my laptop
>::::::: to a school computer, so I can print it out.
>::::::
>:::::: Did I miss the part where the original poster was building a
>:::::: laptop?
>:::::
>::::: here try this
>:::::
>::::: Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my PC to a
>::::: school computer, so I can print it out.
>:::
>::: USB thumbdrive...
>:::
>:: ??
>:: Don't buy a 10.00 floppy buy a 75.00 thumb drive and hope everyone
>:: you deal with has USB.
>::
>:: yeah good one.
>
>Nope....just the school computers....they are usually fairly
>up-to-date.....no one said anything about "everyone"

Well the question is should he put one in a new PC not "tell me how to
transfer files on an up to date school PC". ;)
>
>Plus, a thumbdrive holds a lot more data....
No doubt
>

Ben Pope
July 25th 03, 11:12 PM
MrDancer wrote:
> I found out there is quite a
> difference in quality among brands of 3.5" floppy disks
> (whodathunkit?). Cheap unbranded disks either didn't work or worked
> extremely slowly in the digicam, whether or not you formatted the
> disks. The more expensive disks worked much better.

I always used 3M or Verbatim and still found them to become corrupt far too
easily for my liking.

Ben
--
I'm not just a number. To many, I'm known as a string...

bigbrian
July 25th 03, 11:42 PM
On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 23:16:21 +0100, "Ben Pope" >
wrote:

>NoRemorse wrote:
>> "Ben Pope" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> R_Supp wrote:
>>>> It can be embarrasing to save your MYOB stuff to a USB device then
>>>> have your accountant tell you he can`t use it and in the meantime
>>>> you are paying in excess of a hundred bucks an hour for his
>>>> services.
>>>> Kind of makes the floppy drive look good.
>>>
>>> Kind of makes your 100 bucks an hour accountant look crap for not
>>> investing in a 50bucks 6in1 card reader.
>>
>> How will that help with his accountant? If the accountant doesn't
>> have USB, he probably can't read flash cards either.
>
>Yeah, I got that confused, but if his accountant is using a PC that doesn't
>have USB then shame on him for not spending 20bucks on a USB PCI card. You
>can see where I'm going with this...

Yes, you're trying to blame people for not being as technically up to
date as you would expect them to be. Fair enough, but the fact is that
some people just aren't. I know plenty of people who still think that
a floppy is the best way - some of them doubtless still regard it as
the *only* way - of getting data easily from one PC to another.And in
some of those cases, they're right. My mother (who is 70) has a
computer without a CD writer (until recently she didn't even have a
CD drive at all), and a slow, and erratic, dial up internet
connection. If I want to get some files to her, the easiest way to do
it is to put them on a floppy and give her the disk. You don't know my
mother, but you can't say thet you'll never need to exchange files
with someone like her, and, for $10, a floppy is the ideal solution.
If a floppy drive were $100, it would be a different issue, but
there's just no downside.

Brian

Ben Pope
July 26th 03, 10:42 AM
bigbrian wrote:
> On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 23:16:21 +0100, "Ben Pope" >
> wrote:
>
>> NoRemorse wrote:
>>> "Ben Pope" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> R_Supp wrote:
>>>>> It can be embarrasing to save your MYOB stuff to a USB device then
>>>>> have your accountant tell you he can`t use it and in the meantime
>>>>> you are paying in excess of a hundred bucks an hour for his
>>>>> services.
>>>>> Kind of makes the floppy drive look good.
>>>>
>>>> Kind of makes your 100 bucks an hour accountant look crap for not
>>>> investing in a 50bucks 6in1 card reader.
>>>
>>> How will that help with his accountant? If the accountant doesn't
>>> have USB, he probably can't read flash cards either.
>>
>> Yeah, I got that confused, but if his accountant is using a PC that
>> doesn't have USB then shame on him for not spending 20bucks on a USB
>> PCI card. You can see where I'm going with this...
>
> Yes, you're trying to blame people for not being as technically up to
> date as you would expect them to be.

Not at all, I'm just saying that for the sake of a few quid (bucks) they
could be using a much more secure, reliable, and just generally better media
to receive files from their paying clients.

> <snip lovely tale of mother>

> If a floppy drive were $100, it would be a different issue, but
> there's just no downside.

Apart from them being the least reliable media currently in use.

Ben
--
I'm not just a number. To many, I'm known as a string...

NoRemorse
July 29th 03, 05:15 AM
"Ben Pope" > wrote in message
...
> NoRemorse wrote:
> > "Ben Pope" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> NoRemorse wrote:
> >>> Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my laptop to a
> >>> school computer, so I can print it out.
> >>
> >> Quicker over a network. If you or your school is not connected,
> >> shame on you/them.
> >
> > Oh it's connected. It's just that they charge us for printing and the
> > software that keeps track of the printing money in your account is
> > only installed on the school's computers. Hooking up to the network
> > in labs is tricky. (I've obtained a connection once out of several
> > tries with the same DNS and IP settings.) Public areas do let you
> > connect using DHCP, but that won't help me transfer a file to a lab
> > computer.
>
> Oh well when you say the computers are connected I'm assuming you can use
> something like email or ftp to transfer the files... if you can't, then
> they're not very connected!

Yes I could use email, ftp, or scp. Five minutes from the deadline, I won't
fiddle with any software that will most likely fail (Murphy's law). Didn't I
already say that hooking a laptop to the network in a computer lab with a
printer is impossible at my school? I also won't bother to dive under the
desk to get to the rear usb ports to use a usb keychain. A floppy is quicker
and faster in this case.

--
NoRemorse
"Expect me when you see me."

NoRemorse
July 29th 03, 04:27 PM
"Ben Pope" > wrote in message
...
> NoRemorse wrote:
> > "Ben Pope" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> NoRemorse wrote:
> >>> "Ben Pope" > wrote in message
> >>> ...
> >>>> NoRemorse wrote:
> >>>>> Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my laptop
> >>>>> to a school computer, so I can print it out.
> >>>>
> >>>> Quicker over a network. If you or your school is not connected,
> >>>> shame on you/them.
> >>>
> >>> Oh it's connected. It's just that they charge us for printing and
> >>> the software that keeps track of the printing money in your account
> >>> is
> >>> only installed on the school's computers. Hooking up to the network
> >>> in labs is tricky. (I've obtained a connection once out of several
> >>> tries with the same DNS and IP settings.) Public areas do let you
> >>> connect using DHCP, but that won't help me transfer a file to a lab
> >>> computer.
> >>
> >> Oh well when you say the computers are connected I'm assuming you
> >> can use something like email or ftp to transfer the files... if you
> >> can't, then they're not very connected!
> >
> > Yes I could use email, ftp, or scp. Five minutes from the deadline, I
> > won't fiddle with any software that will most likely fail (Murphy's
> > law).
>
> ftp has been around since before the internet - it's likely to work. If
> you're behind a firewall or being NAT'd you may need to use passive mode.

<sarcasm>Really? No way.</sarcasm>

>
> > Didn't I already say that hooking a laptop to the network in a
> > computer lab with a printer is impossible at my school?
>
> No, you said you need to get from your laptop to your school computer
> (presumably the ones with the printers), I asked you if you could use a
> network, you said they are connected to a network and that there are
public
> areas for you to connect, but that that wouldn't help you. I then said
that
> you could transfer the files (from your laptop, plugged into the public
area
> to the lab computer), using ftp, email or whatever.

Yes, I did say that. "Hooking up to the network in labs is tricky. (I've
obtained a connection once out of several tries with the same DNS and IP
settings.)" And let me clarify something. I would have to specifically go
out of my way to a public area (usually that's another building) to hook up
my laptop to the school's network and then email it to myself and then go
back to the computer lab with the printer and retrieve the email and print
it.

Instead all I have to do is go the printer lab, pop the floppy into the
laptop, copy the file, and put it in the school's computer, and print it
out. It's easy to accomplish in five minutes.

>
> I didn't realise that you would follow that up with "I won't fiddle with
any
> software that will most likely fail".
>
> If you have problems with ftp (Even microsoft have managed that in
explorer)
> then you're doing something wrong.

LOL. Oh I have no problems with FTP. You're quoting me out of context. That
sentence read "Five minutes from the deadline, I won't fiddle with any
software that will most likely fail (Murphy's law)." You missed the "five
minutes" part and "Murphy's law" I believe they change the meaning of that
sentence. Things generally fail exactly when you need them most.

The FTP implementation in Explorer is really bad, BTW. IE has problems with
slow or lagging FTP servers.

>
> > I also won't
> > bother to dive under the desk to get to the rear usb ports to use a
> > usb keychain. A floppy is quicker and faster in this case.
>
> Well if you won't use networks or anything other than a floppy then
clearly
> a floppy is your best bet. I'm just saying it's possible.

I was stating reasons for not using certain things in that situation, not
condemning them. You're making me sound like some sort of floppy fanboy who
won't use anything but the floppy. I think you're missing my point. I have a
network at home that's been running for several years. I use FTP and SCP
regularly. I obviously use email as well. I just don't use these things in
the situation where I have five minutes to copy a file from my laptop to a
school computer to print it out.

I really want to use a usb keychain, but no school computers have rear
mounted usb ports. This means that I would have to either dive under the
desk or pull the computer out to get to the usb ports. Not very comfortable,
is it? If the computers had usb in the front, to hell with the floppy.

--
NoRemorse
"Expect me when you see me."

Ben Pope
July 29th 03, 06:11 PM
NoRemorse wrote:
> <sarcasm>Really? No way.</sarcasm>

Well I apologise for insulting your intelligence.

> Yes, I did say that. "Hooking up to the network in labs is tricky.
> (I've obtained a connection once out of several tries with the same
> DNS and IP settings.)" And let me clarify something. I would have to
> specifically go out of my way to a public area (usually that's
> another building) to hook up my laptop to the school's network and
> then email it to myself and then go back to the computer lab with the
> printer and retrieve the email and print it.

Well I'm unclear of the exact situation and the order in which you would do
things and where you would be at the time. Clearly we have our wires
crossed.

> LOL. Oh I have no problems with FTP. You're quoting me out of
> context. That sentence read "Five minutes from the deadline, I won't
> fiddle with any software that will most likely fail (Murphy's law)."
> You missed the "five minutes" part and "Murphy's law" I believe they
> change the meaning of that sentence. Things generally fail exactly
> when you need them most.

It's hardly like floppies are immune to such failure. I don't believe I was
quoting you out of context.

> The FTP implementation in Explorer is really bad, BTW. IE has
> problems with slow or lagging FTP servers.

I've never had any major problems with it, although I prefer dedicated ftp
programs for anything more complicated than a small file or two.

Ben
--
I'm not just a number. To many, I'm known as a string...

NoRemorse
July 29th 03, 09:58 PM
"Ben Pope" > wrote in message
...
> NoRemorse wrote:
> > <sarcasm>Really? No way.</sarcasm>
>
> Well I apologise for insulting your intelligence.

Thank you. Apology accepted. ;) ;)

>
> > Yes, I did say that. "Hooking up to the network in labs is tricky.
> > (I've obtained a connection once out of several tries with the same
> > DNS and IP settings.)" And let me clarify something. I would have to
> > specifically go out of my way to a public area (usually that's
> > another building) to hook up my laptop to the school's network and
> > then email it to myself and then go back to the computer lab with the
> > printer and retrieve the email and print it.
>
> Well I'm unclear of the exact situation and the order in which you would
do
> things and where you would be at the time. Clearly we have our wires
> crossed.

Yeah I agree.

>
> > LOL. Oh I have no problems with FTP. You're quoting me out of
> > context. That sentence read "Five minutes from the deadline, I won't
> > fiddle with any software that will most likely fail (Murphy's law)."
> > You missed the "five minutes" part and "Murphy's law" I believe they
> > change the meaning of that sentence. Things generally fail exactly
> > when you need them most.
>
> It's hardly like floppies are immune to such failure. I don't believe I
was
> quoting you out of context.

True. Floppies are terrible when it comes to reliability. I usually work
around that by making several copies of the same file on the same floppy.

>
> > The FTP implementation in Explorer is really bad, BTW. IE has
> > problems with slow or lagging FTP servers.
>
> I've never had any major problems with it, although I prefer dedicated ftp
> programs for anything more complicated than a small file or two.

Yeah it's perfect for simple transfer. I'd never entrust it with anything
big, however.

--
NoRemorse
"Expect me when you see me."

b p
August 1st 03, 02:42 AM
On Thu, 31 Jul 2003 22:13:31 GMT, "Scott" >
wrote:

>Thanks to everyone who gave thoughtout, insightful replies. I decided to go
>with the thumb drive. I start building the PC on Saturday. I keep my
>fingers crossed.
>-- Scott

I hope you don't have to install raid drivers for an NT based OS.

Edward J Martin
August 14th 03, 07:56 AM
Have a look at http://zdnet.com/2100-1104-5063018.html

"b p" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 31 Jul 2003 22:13:31 GMT, "Scott" >
> wrote:
>
> >Thanks to everyone who gave thoughtout, insightful replies. I decided to
go
> >with the thumb drive. I start building the PC on Saturday. I keep my
> >fingers crossed.
> >-- Scott
>
> I hope you don't have to install raid drivers for an NT based OS.

b p
August 15th 03, 01:46 AM
On Thu, 14 Aug 2003 07:39:31 -0700, jaeger > wrote:

>In article >,
says...
>
>> Do these devices install as the A: drive?
>
>Maybe, but for the purposes of installing RAID drivers they won't work.
>WinXP requires a genuine physical floppy or a slipstreamed install CD.

Don't know why it would make a difference if it was the a: drive. but
i'll take your word for it.

>Win2003 does away with this absurd limitation.

Bout time

b p
August 16th 03, 02:02 AM
On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 22:16:25 GMT, "Frank" > wrote:

>| >
>| >> Do these devices install as the A: drive?
>
>I have a high speed Sony USB FDD it installs as an A drive on a
>system without a floppy. On a system with one floppy it installs
>as B drive. There is also in my bios a choice to boot from USB
>floppy. Other hardware I don't know about. GA-8I900 and GA-8I1000
>are the mb's I am referencing.

I was afraid of that. Now I'm going to have to go and buy one.

Frank
August 16th 03, 08:31 AM
"b p" > wrote in message
...

| On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 22:16:25 GMT, "Frank" > wrote:
|
| >| >
| >| >> Do these devices install as the A: drive?
| >
| >I have a high speed Sony USB FDD it installs as an A drive on a
| >system without a floppy. On a system with one floppy it installs
| >as B drive. There is also in my bios a choice to boot from USB
| >floppy. Other hardware I don't know about. GA-8I900 and GA-8I1000
| >are the mb's I am referencing.
|
| I was afraid of that. Now I'm going to have to go and buy one.


I bought mine at mwave. Do a little research because the way things
are going there might be a little better deal somewhere else. Also
they may have upgraded this type of thing by now.

b p
August 16th 03, 01:56 PM
On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 07:31:06 GMT, "Frank" > wrote:

>
>"b p" > wrote in message
...
>
>| On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 22:16:25 GMT, "Frank" > wrote:
>|
>| >| >
>| >| >> Do these devices install as the A: drive?
>| >
>| >I have a high speed Sony USB FDD it installs as an A drive on a
>| >system without a floppy. On a system with one floppy it installs
>| >as B drive. There is also in my bios a choice to boot from USB
>| >floppy. Other hardware I don't know about. GA-8I900 and GA-8I1000
>| >are the mb's I am referencing.
>|
>| I was afraid of that. Now I'm going to have to go and buy one.
>
>
>I bought mine at mwave. Do a little research because the way things
>are going there might be a little better deal somewhere else. Also
>they may have upgraded this type of thing by now.
>
will do
thanks

Kalle K.
September 14th 03, 07:47 PM
jaeger wrote:

> In article >,
> says...
>
>
>>The stupidest thing I?ve heard of are those Abit mobos without serial and
>>PS2.
>
>
> That was a great idea, shedding useless and archaic ports. A shame they
> abandoned it.

Unless you're like me, and run several linux servers without
monitors/KBDs/Mice... A serial console (done with a null modem cable) is
the greatest thing ever.

Basically the reason they're still around are external modems (the best
kind), and serial consoles... the second of these reasons continue to be
propogated by businesses who don't feel like having VGA KVMs for every
server. And why not... graphics cards on servers are buggy, and very
problematic.

Kalle K.
September 14th 03, 08:11 PM
If you have an IDE-raid, or SCSI configuration, you're required to press
F6 during WinXP setup, and load the custom drivers off of a Floppy.

jaeger wrote:
> In article >,
> says...
>
>
>>Adding 3rd party hard disk drivers or raid drivers during setup
>
>
> You can add the drivers to a custom WinXP CD. In fact, this is the
> smart way to do it since you can add all your drivers, plus you can set
> the switches so that you don't have to babysit the install.
>
>
>>System recovery using partition magic, nortons, others.
>
>
> Partition Magic will recover from the install CD. Ghost is crap unless
> you do enterprise deployment, but the image disc itself is bootable.
>

Kalle K.
September 14th 03, 08:23 PM
You asked us to name a situation... no stipulation was placed on what
that situation must intail. I find the same to be useful, since at my
work we're still <cringe> using nt4... when the network's out, and I
need to get some paperwork printed asap, I've used a floppy to print a
doc out in my bosses office.

jaeger wrote:

> In article >,
> says...
>
>
>>Thats crap, he's on about the fact the college Desktop only had a floppy
>>drive free so he could transfer his data..
>>
>>Thats the relevance..
>
>
> No, it is not relevant to compare what is probably an obsolete machine
> to one being built today from new parts.

Kalle K.
September 14th 03, 08:24 PM
.... only to find it corrupt. ;)

It's happened to me... thank god my prof understood.

NoRemorse wrote:

> "bp" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 07:17:56 GMT, jaeger > wrote:
>>
>>
>>>In article >,
says...
>>>
>>>
>>>>Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my laptop to a
>
> school
>
>>>>computer, so I can print it out.
>>>
>>>Did I miss the part where the original poster was building a laptop?
>>
>>here try this
>>
>>Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my PC to a
>>school computer, so I can print it out.
>
>
> Don't forget running from the dorm to the computer lab holding onto the
> floppy as if your life depended on it. ;)
>

Kalle K.
September 14th 03, 08:25 PM
It's not only NT4 that you'd have to worry about... it's also the policy
restrictions that a [good] IT department might put in place.

Dodgy wrote:

> On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 21:38:01 -0400, "Roger Zoul"
> > waffled on about something:
>
>
>>bp wrote:
>>:: On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 07:17:56 GMT, jaeger > wrote:
>>::
>>::: In article >,
>>::: says...
>>:::
>>:::: Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my laptop to
>>:::: a school computer, so I can print it out.
>>:::
>>::: Did I miss the part where the original poster was building a laptop?
>>::
>>:: here try this
>>::
>>:: Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my PC to a
>>:: school computer, so I can print it out.
>>
>>USB thumbdrive...
>
>
> Unless you happen to be working with NT 4...
> --
> MUSHROOMS ARE THE OPIATE OF THE MOOSES

Kalle K.
September 14th 03, 08:27 PM
Name a school that allows filesharing between lab "workstations", or one
that doesn't VLAN-off the dorm networks. ;) If you can name one... it
has gotten hit pretty hard over the last couple of months.

Ben Pope wrote:

> NoRemorse wrote:
>
>>Copying a paper (five minutes from the deadline) from my laptop to a
>>school computer, so I can print it out.
>
>
> Quicker over a network. If you or your school is not connected, shame on
> you/them.
>
> Ben

Kalle K.
September 14th 03, 08:29 PM
What?? Double copies on the same floppy?? You've still got a single
point of failure! ;)

NoRemorse wrote:

> "Ben Pope" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>NoRemorse wrote:
>>
>>><sarcasm>Really? No way.</sarcasm>
>>
>>Well I apologise for insulting your intelligence.
>
>
> Thank you. Apology accepted. ;) ;)
>
>
>>>Yes, I did say that. "Hooking up to the network in labs is tricky.
>>>(I've obtained a connection once out of several tries with the same
>>>DNS and IP settings.)" And let me clarify something. I would have to
>>>specifically go out of my way to a public area (usually that's
>>>another building) to hook up my laptop to the school's network and
>>>then email it to myself and then go back to the computer lab with the
>>>printer and retrieve the email and print it.
>>
>>Well I'm unclear of the exact situation and the order in which you would
>
> do
>
>>things and where you would be at the time. Clearly we have our wires
>>crossed.
>
>
> Yeah I agree.
>
>
>>>LOL. Oh I have no problems with FTP. You're quoting me out of
>>>context. That sentence read "Five minutes from the deadline, I won't
>>>fiddle with any software that will most likely fail (Murphy's law)."
>>>You missed the "five minutes" part and "Murphy's law" I believe they
>>>change the meaning of that sentence. Things generally fail exactly
>>>when you need them most.
>>
>>It's hardly like floppies are immune to such failure. I don't believe I
>
> was
>
>>quoting you out of context.
>
>
> True. Floppies are terrible when it comes to reliability. I usually work
> around that by making several copies of the same file on the same floppy.
>
>
>>>The FTP implementation in Explorer is really bad, BTW. IE has
>>>problems with slow or lagging FTP servers.
>>
>>I've never had any major problems with it, although I prefer dedicated ftp
>>programs for anything more complicated than a small file or two.
>
>
> Yeah it's perfect for simple transfer. I'd never entrust it with anything
> big, however.
>