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ted
October 6th 08, 05:01 PM
Have a ecs geforce 7050m-m v2 motherboard. Trying to install a 8800 &
am unable. What are the steps to follow or you followed? TIA

Augustus[_3_]
October 7th 08, 12:52 AM
"ted" > wrote in message
...
> Have a ecs geforce 7050m-m v2 motherboard. Trying to install a 8800 &
> am unable. What are the steps to follow or you followed? TIA

What exactly do you mean by "am unable".....you can't physically fit the
card in the m/b & case assembly? You can't hookup the PCIe 4 prong power
outlet? You can do all this and it won't boot? How do you know it's the
mainboard and not the p/s or the 8800GTS?

deimos[_2_]
October 7th 08, 12:53 AM
ted wrote:
> Have a ecs geforce 7050m-m v2 motherboard. Trying to install a 8800 &
> am unable. What are the steps to follow or you followed? TIA

Where exactly are you getting stuck?

Looking up your board, it appears you have an Micro ATX integrated board
with a single PCI-E 16x slot. So barring any case obstructions, are you
able to fit it in the slot? You have to slide over that white locking
tab first you know. Be sure it's fully seated, you cannot have it
touching hard dries and what not and being shoved up out of the slot.

Next lock the tab back, screw in the card, and connect one PCI-E 6-pin
power lead from your PSU to the connector on the card. This is CRITICAL
for an 8800 GTS (320/640/512MB). Now power up, install your drivers and
get going! :)

You can safely use NVidia's latest Geforce driver instead of your
manufacturers'. They are in fact, mostly the same. If you experience
problems with lockups and blue screens, it's likely you have an
inadequate PSU (common with smaller systems like you might have).

A GTS requires around 26A (amps) on the 12V rail (+12v1, +12v2, etc)
total for the system. This should be marked clearly on a label on the
side of your PSU unit.

Phil Weldon
October 7th 08, 04:57 AM
'deimos' wrote, in part:
> A GTS requires around 26A (amps) on the 12V rail (+12v1, +12v2, etc) total
> for the system. This should be marked clearly on a label on the side of
> your PSU unit.
_____

Where did you get the idea that a 8800 GTS required 26 A X 12 V = 312
Watts? A 350 Watt supply is very likely to be all that is needed for his
ENTIRE system.

Phil Weldon

"deimos" <[email protected]> wrote in message
...
> ted wrote:
>> Have a ecs geforce 7050m-m v2 motherboard. Trying to install a 8800 &
>> am unable. What are the steps to follow or you followed? TIA
>
> Where exactly are you getting stuck?
>
> Looking up your board, it appears you have an Micro ATX integrated board
> with a single PCI-E 16x slot. So barring any case obstructions, are you
> able to fit it in the slot? You have to slide over that white locking tab
> first you know. Be sure it's fully seated, you cannot have it touching
> hard dries and what not and being shoved up out of the slot.
>
> Next lock the tab back, screw in the card, and connect one PCI-E 6-pin
> power lead from your PSU to the connector on the card. This is CRITICAL
> for an 8800 GTS (320/640/512MB). Now power up, install your drivers and
> get going! :)
>
> You can safely use NVidia's latest Geforce driver instead of your
> manufacturers'. They are in fact, mostly the same. If you experience
> problems with lockups and blue screens, it's likely you have an inadequate
> PSU (common with smaller systems like you might have).
>
> A GTS requires around 26A (amps) on the 12V rail (+12v1, +12v2, etc) total
> for the system. This should be marked clearly on a label on the side of
> your PSU unit.

deimos[_2_]
October 8th 08, 12:09 AM
Phil Weldon wrote:
> 'deimos' wrote, in part:
>> A GTS requires around 26A (amps) on the 12V rail (+12v1, +12v2, etc)
>> total for the system. This should be marked clearly on a label on the
>> side of your PSU unit.
> _____
>
> Where did you get the idea that a 8800 GTS required 26 A X 12 V = 312
> Watts? A 350 Watt supply is very likely to be all that is needed for
> his ENTIRE system.
>
> Phil Weldon
>
> "deimos" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> ...
>> ted wrote:
>>> Have a ecs geforce 7050m-m v2 motherboard. Trying to install a 8800 &
>>> am unable. What are the steps to follow or you followed? TIA
>>
>> Where exactly are you getting stuck?
>>
>> Looking up your board, it appears you have an Micro ATX integrated
>> board with a single PCI-E 16x slot. So barring any case obstructions,
>> are you able to fit it in the slot? You have to slide over that white
>> locking tab first you know. Be sure it's fully seated, you cannot
>> have it touching hard dries and what not and being shoved up out of
>> the slot.
>>
>> Next lock the tab back, screw in the card, and connect one PCI-E 6-pin
>> power lead from your PSU to the connector on the card. This is
>> CRITICAL for an 8800 GTS (320/640/512MB). Now power up, install your
>> drivers and get going! :)
>>
>> You can safely use NVidia's latest Geforce driver instead of your
>> manufacturers'. They are in fact, mostly the same. If you experience
>> problems with lockups and blue screens, it's likely you have an
>> inadequate PSU (common with smaller systems like you might have).
>>
>> A GTS requires around 26A (amps) on the 12V rail (+12v1, +12v2, etc)
>> total for the system. This should be marked clearly on a label on the
>> side of your PSU unit.
>

Because Watts is completely useless as a factor for determining system
load. NVidia's guideline for the 8800 series is 26A on the 12V rail.
This is a combination of all 12v rails combined and is intended to
account for the average system utilization of everything including your
CPU/mobo/RAM, drives, other cards, and fans.

The watts rating on your PSU label is the sum of all voltages and rails.
Since you're not using the +5v or 3.3v (if it exists) for a video
card, the important part is the 12v amps.

350w is likely all you need, but if a PSU is only 70% or lower
efficient, then it cannot deliver that peak voltage for long, and for
the really cheap ones, when they are at 80% load or greater, they burst
into flame.

PSU's LIKE to be at 25-50% load most of the time. In actual testing,
only fairly decent units will output correct and constant voltage at
high load.

Paul
October 8th 08, 12:55 AM
deimos wrote:
> Phil Weldon wrote:
>> 'deimos' wrote, in part:
>>> A GTS requires around 26A (amps) on the 12V rail (+12v1, +12v2, etc)
>>> total for the system. This should be marked clearly on a label on
>>> the side of your PSU unit.
>> _____
>>
>> Where did you get the idea that a 8800 GTS required 26 A X 12 V = 312
>> Watts? A 350 Watt supply is very likely to be all that is needed for
>> his ENTIRE system.
>>
>> Phil Weldon
>>
>> "deimos" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> ...
>>> ted wrote:
>>>> Have a ecs geforce 7050m-m v2 motherboard. Trying to install a 8800 &
>>>> am unable. What are the steps to follow or you followed? TIA
>>>
>>> Where exactly are you getting stuck?
>>>
>>> Looking up your board, it appears you have an Micro ATX integrated
>>> board with a single PCI-E 16x slot. So barring any case
>>> obstructions, are you able to fit it in the slot? You have to slide
>>> over that white locking tab first you know. Be sure it's fully
>>> seated, you cannot have it touching hard dries and what not and being
>>> shoved up out of the slot.
>>>
>>> Next lock the tab back, screw in the card, and connect one PCI-E
>>> 6-pin power lead from your PSU to the connector on the card. This is
>>> CRITICAL for an 8800 GTS (320/640/512MB). Now power up, install your
>>> drivers and get going! :)
>>>
>>> You can safely use NVidia's latest Geforce driver instead of your
>>> manufacturers'. They are in fact, mostly the same. If you
>>> experience problems with lockups and blue screens, it's likely you
>>> have an inadequate PSU (common with smaller systems like you might
>>> have).
>>>
>>> A GTS requires around 26A (amps) on the 12V rail (+12v1, +12v2, etc)
>>> total for the system. This should be marked clearly on a label on
>>> the side of your PSU unit.
>>
>
> Because Watts is completely useless as a factor for determining system
> load. NVidia's guideline for the 8800 series is 26A on the 12V rail.
> This is a combination of all 12v rails combined and is intended to
> account for the average system utilization of everything including your
> CPU/mobo/RAM, drives, other cards, and fans.
>

<<snip>>

And that is what is wrong with Nvidia's guideline. They should simply
give a (realistic) power requirement for just their card, as it isn't
that difficult to work out the power requirements for the rest of
the computer. One customer may have a 65W processor, another 150W, and
a system guesstimate is a poor substitute for just giving the video
card power alone.

I get power measurements for video cards from Xbitlabs, and at least
that gives a card level value. Since their measurement is of one
card, it isn't going to be a very good representation, but it
beats "26 amps" in terms of giving customers information they
can use.

8800gts 99W to 109W (clock rate dependent), 98.2W/12V = 8.18A (ignoring the 3.3V rail)
When the computer starts, it is around ~40W, a drop in the bucket.

http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/video/display/xfx-gf8800gts_4.html

Paul

ted
October 8th 08, 08:32 PM
Well after spending $800, and lots of hours. We found the problem.
Evidently, the monitor, which is a new LCD monitor failed. The reason
we couldn't figure that out is evidently the digital side failed only
analog side kept working. Yes we did get a new power supply rated at
500 W. Now. We need to send an angry letter to Samsung about their new
LCD monitor. We did check and find out that produced pretty reliable
stuff, but evidently, we got the exception.

ted wrote:
> Have a ecs geforce 7050m-m v2 motherboard. Trying to install a 8800 &
> am unable. What are the steps to follow or you followed? TIA

Augustus[_3_]
October 9th 08, 05:18 AM
"ted" > wrote in message
...
> Well after spending $800, and lots of hours. We found the problem.
> Evidently, the monitor, which is a new LCD monitor failed. The reason
> we couldn't figure that out is evidently the digital side failed only
> analog side kept working. Yes we did get a new power supply rated at
> 500 W. Now. We need to send an angry letter to Samsung about their new
> LCD monitor. We did check and find out that produced pretty reliable
> stuff, but evidently, we got the exception.

Ok, so that was your issue......but what you posted was "am unable to
install". A generic description like that is meaningless for relevant help
or advice. Had you posted that you were able to fit the board, hook it up,
the system powered on and booted and there was no signal output, very likely
more relevant advice such as "have you tried both DVI and VGA output on the
monitor" or "have you tried the DVI dongle for analog input" would likely
have been offered. What type of DVI cable did you use to hook up the
monitor? Have you tried the DVI input with a different DVI cable? Or on a
different system?
Kind of like posting "I've lost the key to my car. It's a Chevy Avalanche.
With a 5.3L. Can you help me find it?"

Phil Weldon[_2_]
October 12th 08, 04:06 PM
'deimos' wrote, in part:
> Because Watts is completely useless as a factor for determining system
> load. NVidia's guideline for the 8800 series is 26A on the 12V rail. This
> is a combination of all 12v rails combined and is intended to account for
> the average system utilization of everything including your CPU/mobo/RAM,
> drives, other cards, and fans.
_____

Read the standards for ATX 12v power supplies. Watts does just fine for
judging a power supply (given that the manufacturer tells the truth),
especially since, for DC, voltage multiplied by amperage always equals watts
and the DC rails share output power so most of the total output wattage is
available to the voltage rails that need it at the expense of those that do
not.

Not to mention that the owner of a system is much more likely to know its
specific power requirements than nVidia, a company that neither produces
display adapters nor looks over your shoulder as you sit at your keyboard.

Finally, (+12v1, +12v2) implies TWO rails, one for, possibly, a display
adapter, and the other for everything else. In which case, a +12v1 rail with
a 15 ampere capacity will be more than fine for a 8800 GTS.

I could go on, but I won't.

What the hey, I will.

A power supply is rated at the OUTPUT power, so the efficiency does no LOWER
that rating.

70% efficiency? You shouldn't be buying such an inefficient supply, what
with global warming and the rising cost of electricity.

And it is very possible for an indecent power supply having regulation
problems at LOW loads.

Once you start bringing indecent power supplies around you may be
embarrassed at any moment.

Phil Weldon

"deimos" <[email protected]> wrote in message
...
> Phil Weldon wrote:
>> 'deimos' wrote, in part:
>>> A GTS requires around 26A (amps) on the 12V rail (+12v1, +12v2, etc)
>>> total for the system. This should be marked clearly on a label on the
>>> side of your PSU unit.
>> _____
>>
>> Where did you get the idea that a 8800 GTS required 26 A X 12 V = 312
>> Watts? A 350 Watt supply is very likely to be all that is needed for his
>> ENTIRE system.
>>
>> Phil Weldon
>>
>> "deimos" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> ...
>>> ted wrote:
>>>> Have a ecs geforce 7050m-m v2 motherboard. Trying to install a 8800 &
>>>> am unable. What are the steps to follow or you followed? TIA
>>>
>>> Where exactly are you getting stuck?
>>>
>>> Looking up your board, it appears you have an Micro ATX integrated board
>>> with a single PCI-E 16x slot. So barring any case obstructions, are you
>>> able to fit it in the slot? You have to slide over that white locking
>>> tab first you know. Be sure it's fully seated, you cannot have it
>>> touching hard dries and what not and being shoved up out of the slot.
>>>
>>> Next lock the tab back, screw in the card, and connect one PCI-E 6-pin
>>> power lead from your PSU to the connector on the card. This is CRITICAL
>>> for an 8800 GTS (320/640/512MB). Now power up, install your drivers and
>>> get going! :)
>>>
>>> You can safely use NVidia's latest Geforce driver instead of your
>>> manufacturers'. They are in fact, mostly the same. If you experience
>>> problems with lockups and blue screens, it's likely you have an
>>> inadequate PSU (common with smaller systems like you might have).
>>>
>>> A GTS requires around 26A (amps) on the 12V rail (+12v1, +12v2, etc)
>>> total for the system. This should be marked clearly on a label on the
>>> side of your PSU unit.
>>
>
> Because Watts is completely useless as a factor for determining system
> load. NVidia's guideline for the 8800 series is 26A on the 12V rail. This
> is a combination of all 12v rails combined and is intended to account for
> the average system utilization of everything including your CPU/mobo/RAM,
> drives, other cards, and fans.
>
> The watts rating on your PSU label is the sum of all voltages and rails.
> Since you're not using the +5v or 3.3v (if it exists) for a video card,
> the important part is the 12v amps.
>
> 350w is likely all you need, but if a PSU is only 70% or lower efficient,
> then it cannot deliver that peak voltage for long, and for the really
> cheap ones, when they are at 80% load or greater, they burst into flame.
>
> PSU's LIKE to be at 25-50% load most of the time. In actual testing, only
> fairly decent units will output correct and constant voltage at high load.