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Dave[_33_]
September 17th 08, 04:32 PM
Is there a difference between the same CPU running at 65w vs 125w?

I see the same CPU on NewEgg with two different power requirements and
I'm not sure what the difference is.

Thanks!

Wes Newell[_2_]
September 17th 08, 05:28 PM
On Wed, 17 Sep 2008 15:32:50 +0000, Dave wrote:

> Is there a difference between the same CPU running at 65w vs 125w?
>
> I see the same CPU on NewEgg with two different power requirements and
> I'm not sure what the difference is.
>
> Thanks!

The difference is that one uses less electricity. This is because it runs
at a lower default voltage. Normally, the lower watt one will overclock
more also.

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Dave[_33_]
September 17th 08, 08:11 PM
In article >,
says...
> On Wed, 17 Sep 2008 15:32:50 +0000, Dave wrote:
>
> > Is there a difference between the same CPU running at 65w vs 125w?
> >
> > I see the same CPU on NewEgg with two different power requirements and
> > I'm not sure what the difference is.
> >
> > Thanks!
>
> The difference is that one uses less electricity. This is because it runs
> at a lower default voltage. Normally, the lower watt one will overclock
> more also.

Awesome, thanks.

So I should always pick the lower watt one if possible?

Wes Newell[_2_]
September 18th 08, 06:02 AM
On Wed, 17 Sep 2008 19:11:47 +0000, Dave wrote:

> In article >,
> says...
>> On Wed, 17 Sep 2008 15:32:50 +0000, Dave wrote:
>>
>> > Is there a difference between the same CPU running at 65w vs 125w?
>> >
>> > I see the same CPU on NewEgg with two different power requirements
>> > and I'm not sure what the difference is.
>> >
>> > Thanks!
>>
>> The difference is that one uses less electricity. This is because it
>> runs at a lower default voltage. Normally, the lower watt one will
>> overclock more also.
>
> Awesome, thanks.
>
> So I should always pick the lower watt one if possible?

yes, all other features being the same.

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Scott Lurndal
September 18th 08, 08:55 PM
Dave > writes:
>In article >,
says...
>> On Wed, 17 Sep 2008 15:32:50 +0000, Dave wrote:
>>
>> > Is there a difference between the same CPU running at 65w vs 125w?
>> >
>> > I see the same CPU on NewEgg with two different power requirements and
>> > I'm not sure what the difference is.
>> >
>> > Thanks!
>>
>> The difference is that one uses less electricity. This is because it runs
>> at a lower default voltage. Normally, the lower watt one will overclock
>> more also.
>
>Awesome, thanks.
>
>So I should always pick the lower watt one if possible?


It depends on your performance requirements. If the 65 watt part could
perform at the level of the 125w part, they're wouldn't be a 125w part.

scott

Wes Newell[_2_]
September 18th 08, 10:32 PM
On Thu, 18 Sep 2008 19:55:33 +0000, Scott Lurndal wrote:

On Thu, 18 Sep 2008 19:55:33 +0000, Scott Lurndal wrote:

> Dave > writes:
>>In article >,
says...
>>> On Wed, 17 Sep 2008 15:32:50 +0000, Dave wrote:
>>>
>>> > Is there a difference between the same CPU running at 65w vs 125w?
>>> >
>>> > I see the same CPU on NewEgg with two different power requirements
>>> > and I'm not sure what the difference is.
>>> >
>>> > Thanks!
>>>
>>> The difference is that one uses less electricity. This is because it
>>> runs at a lower default voltage. Normally, the lower watt one will
>>> overclock more also.
>>
>>Awesome, thanks.
>>
>>So I should always pick the lower watt one if possible?
>
>
> It depends on your performance requirements. If the 65 watt part could
> perform at the level of the 125w part, they're wouldn't be a 125w part.
>
> scott

I hope you aren't thinking a 125W cpu will out perform a 65W cpu when they
are both running the same speed. That's just not the case with the same
model CPU. All CPU's are refined over time. Some even with the core will
work at the rated speed at lower voltage, thus drawing less current. The
speed would be identical. The only way one would out perform the other
would be by overclocking it. And a lower watt rated cpu will normally
overclock higher than a higher watt rated cpu.

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mr deo
September 20th 08, 01:07 AM
"Wes Newell" > wrote in message
...
> I hope you aren't thinking a 125W cpu will out perform a 65W cpu when they
> are both running the same speed. That's just not the case with the same
> model CPU. All CPU's are refined over time. Some even with the core will
> work at the rated speed at lower voltage, thus drawing less current. The
> speed would be identical. The only way one would out perform the other
> would be by overclocking it. And a lower watt rated cpu will normally
> overclock higher than a higher watt rated cpu.
>
> --
> Want the ultimate in free OTA SD/HDTV Recorder? http://mythtv.org
> My Tivo Experience http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/tivo.htm
> Tivo HD/S3 compared http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/mythtivo.htm
> AMD cpu help http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/cpu.php

WES FOR PRESIDENT...

U got my vote man!...
That aside... I thought a 65w jump from 125w was a lot..
If this is a Mobile-vs-Desk part then I think it's a huge dip. On a side
note ( I figgure you will know ) do the mfgr's sometimes carry the same part
numbers through to newgen products when there's a change to a higher density
tech?

Wes Newell[_2_]
September 20th 08, 07:08 AM
On Sat, 20 Sep 2008 00:07:02 +0000, mr deo wrote:

> That aside... I thought a 65w jump from 125w was a lot.. If this is a
> Mobile-vs-Desk part then I think it's a huge dip. On a side note ( I
> figgure you will know ) do the mfgr's sometimes carry the same part
> numbers through to newgen products when there's a change to a higher
> density tech?

True part numbers will always be different for one core to the next afaik.
However, many times the selling model number will be the same from one gen
to the next. A great example of this was with the AMD XP line of CPU's.


--
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pokey man
November 7th 08, 03:31 AM
"Wes Newell" > wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 20 Sep 2008 00:07:02 +0000, mr deo wrote:
>
> > That aside... I thought a 65w jump from 125w was a lot.. If this is a
> > Mobile-vs-Desk part then I think it's a huge dip. On a side note ( I
> > figgure you will know ) do the mfgr's sometimes carry the same part
> > numbers through to newgen products when there's a change to a higher
> > density tech?
>
> True part numbers will always be different for one core to the next afaik.
> However, many times the selling model number will be the same from one gen
> to the next. A great example of this was with the AMD XP line of CPU's.
>
>
> --
> Want the ultimate in free OTA SD/HDTV Recorder? http://mythtv.org
> My Tivo Experience http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/tivo.htm
> Tivo HD/S3 compared http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/mythtivo.htm
> AMD cpu help http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/cpu.php


Frequency takes more power so you will find higher frequency processors draw
more power...and create more heat just like a lightbulb the difference in
wattage will have more or less light and more or less heat. HRH

kk

Wes Newell[_2_]
November 7th 08, 08:08 AM
On Thu, 06 Nov 2008 21:31:32 -0500, pokey man wrote:

> "Wes Newell" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Sat, 20 Sep 2008 00:07:02 +0000, mr deo wrote:
>>
>> > That aside... I thought a 65w jump from 125w was a lot.. If this is a
>> > Mobile-vs-Desk part then I think it's a huge dip. On a side note ( I
>> > figgure you will know ) do the mfgr's sometimes carry the same part
>> > numbers through to newgen products when there's a change to a higher
>> > density tech?
>>
>> True part numbers will always be different for one core to the next
>> afaik. However, many times the selling model number will be the same
>> from one gen to the next. A great example of this was with the AMD XP
>> line of CPU's.
>
> Frequency takes more power so you will find higher frequency processors
> draw more power...and create more heat just like a lightbulb the
> difference in wattage will have more or less light and more or less
> heat. HRH
>
Frequency has very little meaning in power consumption. My dual core 4200+
draws less power with 2 cores running at 2.2Ghz than my older single core
3000+ running at 2.0Ghz. The only time you'll see a noticeable increase in
power consumption is when you increase the core voltage.

--
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Zoot
November 7th 08, 05:57 PM
>> Frequency takes more power so you will find higher frequency processors
>> draw more power...and create more heat just like a lightbulb the
>> difference in wattage will have more or less light and more or less
>> heat. HRH
>>
> Frequency has very little meaning in power consumption. My dual core 4200+
> draws less power with 2 cores running at 2.2Ghz than my older single core
> 3000+ running at 2.0Ghz. The only time you'll see a noticeable increase in
> power consumption is when you increase the core voltage.
>

That is correct - higer frequency processors draw more power because their
voltage is usually
set higher. If you increase the voltage on an idle cpu, you will see the
power consumption increase - dramatically. A change of .1 v can make a big
difference.

Changing cpu frequency by itself doesn't make a huge difference. Try it on
an idle cpu, or one with a constant load, and watch what happens - power
consumption will not change very much. Then bump the voltage up or down by
..1v and watch power consumption significantly change.

I have a Phenom 9950 2600MHz. I can ratchet the cpu down to 1000MHz, and
power consumption changes by maybe 5%. If I then drop the voltage by .3v,
power consumption drops by about 20%. Likewise, boosting the cpu to 2800MHz
makes no noticeable change in power consumption. And surprisingly, it's rock
solid without having to change the voltage any.

pokey man
December 4th 08, 05:32 AM
"Zoot" > wrote in message
...
> >> Frequency takes more power so you will find higher frequency processors
> >> draw more power...and create more heat just like a lightbulb the
> >> difference in wattage will have more or less light and more or less
> >> heat. HRH
> >>
> > Frequency has very little meaning in power consumption. My dual core
4200+
> > draws less power with 2 cores running at 2.2Ghz than my older single
core
> > 3000+ running at 2.0Ghz. The only time you'll see a noticeable increase
in
> > power consumption is when you increase the core voltage.
> >
>
> That is correct - higer frequency processors draw more power because their
> voltage is usually
> set higher. If you increase the voltage on an idle cpu, you will see the
> power consumption increase - dramatically. A change of .1 v can make a big
> difference.
>
> Changing cpu frequency by itself doesn't make a huge difference. Try it on
> an idle cpu, or one with a constant load, and watch what happens - power
> consumption will not change very much. Then bump the voltage up or down by
> .1v and watch power consumption significantly change.
>
> I have a Phenom 9950 2600MHz. I can ratchet the cpu down to 1000MHz, and
> power consumption changes by maybe 5%. If I then drop the voltage by .3v,
> power consumption drops by about 20%. Likewise, boosting the cpu to
2800MHz
> makes no noticeable change in power consumption. And surprisingly, it's
rock
> solid without having to change the voltage any.
>
>

this is true as voltage +/- so does amps