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Reader
October 22nd 07, 05:38 AM
Hi, I am here to have some knowledge b/w the two resolutions (Graphic
Card Resolution vs. Monitor Resolution).
What is the relation b/w two ?

Actually I want to have more desktop space. So before buying anything
I want to know the relation b/w two.
Any pointers/help will be highly appreciated.

Thanks :)

Man-wai Chang ToDie
October 22nd 07, 08:54 AM
Reader wrote:
> Hi, I am here to have some knowledge b/w the two resolutions (Graphic
> Card Resolution vs. Monitor Resolution).
> What is the relation b/w two ?

LCD monitor has only one native, maximum resolution. Anything below that
is emulated by stretching the output. SO make sure the VGA card you
bought could support the LCD monitor's native resolution for best viewing.

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DaveW[_4_]
October 22nd 07, 11:29 PM
Assuming that you are using an LCD monitor, then you HAVE to set the video
card's resolution setting to the Native Resolution of your LCD monitor. For
an LCD there is only ONE best resolution, and it is noted in the
instructions for the monitor.

--
---------------------
DaveW

---------------------
"Reader" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Hi, I am here to have some knowledge b/w the two resolutions (Graphic
> Card Resolution vs. Monitor Resolution).
> What is the relation b/w two ?
>
> Actually I want to have more desktop space. So before buying anything
> I want to know the relation b/w two.
> Any pointers/help will be highly appreciated.
>
> Thanks :)
>

Victek
October 23rd 07, 03:37 PM
> Hi, I am here to have some knowledge b/w the two resolutions (Graphic
> Card Resolution vs. Monitor Resolution).
> What is the relation b/w two ?
>
> Actually I want to have more desktop space. So before buying anything
> I want to know the relation b/w two.
> Any pointers/help will be highly appreciated.

Since you want more desktop space I suggest you find the screen size you
want first. Then you can make sure you select a video card that supports
the screen's highest resolution in 32 bit color. Assuming you want a flat
panel you don't need to worry about refresh rate.

Alfred Einstein[_2_]
October 23rd 07, 06:42 PM
"Reader" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Hi, I am here to have some knowledge b/w the two resolutions (Graphic
> Card Resolution vs. Monitor Resolution).
> What is the relation b/w two ?
>
> Actually I want to have more desktop space. So before buying anything
> I want to know the relation b/w two.
> Any pointers/help will be highly appreciated.

The video card's so-called "resolution" specifies how many dots it is
capable of displaying, vertically and horizontally. It can be changed over a
wide range of settings. But this does not specify the resolution.
(Resolution is specified in dots per inch (or pixels per inch). The video
card only specifies total dots.)

Your monitor's resolution determines what you can actually see. The monitor,
whether CRT or LCD, has a fixed number of active elements (pixels) per inch
(or per millimeter). The number of pixels per inch sets an upper limit on
your display resolution. This usually runs somewhere around 100 dots per
inch.

If your video card is set to display 1024x768, then your 1024 horizontal
pixels are spread across the horizontal width of your monitor. If that width
is, say, 16 inches (typical 21" CRT), then you're seeing 64 dots per inch.
(On a screen twice the size, you'll only get 64 dots per inch!)

If you set the card to 1280x1024, then the 1280 horizontal pixels yield 80
dots per inch.

Crank it up to 1600x1200, and you're getting 100 dots per inch. (A good 21"
CRT can be pushed to about 110 per inch, so 1600x1200 is nearly the most you
can do.)

But these numbers only apply if your monitor's pixel pitch can provide at
least that much resolution. CRTs specs show their dot pitch as millimeters
between pixels. A good CRT might have a dot pitch of about 0.22 mm. That's
115 dots per inch.

Reader
October 25th 07, 01:07 AM
So this implies I should look for maximum resolution supporting
monitor to have more desktop space.
Graphic cards can support upto good number of resolution, i mean much
bigger resolution numbers as compared to monitor.
The restriction of desktop space is due to monitor (not graphic card).

Right ?

Thanks for those who replied and Thanks in advance for the rest.

Victek
October 25th 07, 05:02 AM
> So this implies I should look for maximum resolution supporting
> monitor to have more desktop space.
> Graphic cards can support upto good number of resolution, i mean much
> bigger resolution numbers as compared to monitor.
> The restriction of desktop space is due to monitor (not graphic card).
>
> Right ?

With today's graphics cards that come with a lot of memory it's generally
true that the monitor sets the limit on resolution not the card, but it's
always good to confirm a card's specs.