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NoSpam
August 3rd 07, 04:27 PM
Dear Group,

I need a graphics card for the ASUS A7N8X-X
motherboard. ( I do images, not gaming, not TV.)

I am thinking of the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200
or 400 card. These are listed as compatible for the
mentioned motherboard.

What confuses me and for which I am seeking ad-
vice is that the described card is offered under
names like Jaton, HP, Dell etc.

Are all these cards interchangeable? Do they
differ in driver, in output cables or format
(VGA vs DVI)? Do you know of a reliable source
for purchase?

I have spent a lot of time trying to find answers
by googling, but without success.

Any help is appreciated.

GR.

Victek
August 3rd 07, 04:50 PM
> I need a graphics card for the ASUS A7N8X-X
> motherboard. ( I do images, not gaming, not TV.)
>
> I am thinking of the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200
> or 400 card. These are listed as compatible for the
> mentioned motherboard.
>
> What confuses me and for which I am seeking ad-
> vice is that the described card is offered under
> names like Jaton, HP, Dell etc.
>
> Are all these cards interchangeable? Do they
> differ in driver, in output cables or format
> (VGA vs DVI)? Do you know of a reliable source
> for purchase?

Have a look at www.newegg.com - there will be pictures for the cards that
will show the outputs. I haven't checked, but it may be possible to get
different combinations of ports, such as S-Video output, VGA, DVI, etc. In
my experience they all use the standard Nvidia drivers so the brand doesn't
matter in that respect.

NoSpam
August 3rd 07, 05:25 PM
Dear Victek,

Thank you for your quick response. I looked at the newegg.com
site and found two versions of the GeForce2 MX 400 card.
They are both PCI cards, no AGP is available. The pictures do
show the output which is of value.

I had been wishing for an AGP card. Since I do have empty PCI
slots I could install the card from newegg, but I think that an AGP
card would be better. What do you think

I could also get an AGP card elsewhere since I now seem to know
what the output looks like

Thanks
GR.
"Victek" > wrote in message
...
> > I need a graphics card for the ASUS A7N8X-X
> > motherboard. ( I do images, not gaming, not TV.)
> >
> > I am thinking of the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200
> > or 400 card. These are listed as compatible for the
> > mentioned motherboard.
> >
> > What confuses me and for which I am seeking ad-
> > vice is that the described card is offered under
> > names like Jaton, HP, Dell etc.
> >
> > Are all these cards interchangeable? Do they
> > differ in driver, in output cables or format
> > (VGA vs DVI)? Do you know of a reliable source
> > for purchase?
>
> Have a look at www.newegg.com - there will be pictures for the cards that
> will show the outputs. I haven't checked, but it may be possible to get
> different combinations of ports, such as S-Video output, VGA, DVI, etc.
In
> my experience they all use the standard Nvidia drivers so the brand
doesn't
> matter in that respect.
>

Paul
August 3rd 07, 06:31 PM
Victek wrote:
>> I need a graphics card for the ASUS A7N8X-X
>> motherboard. ( I do images, not gaming, not TV.)
>>
>> I am thinking of the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200
>> or 400 card. These are listed as compatible for the
>> mentioned motherboard.
>>
>> What confuses me and for which I am seeking ad-
>> vice is that the described card is offered under
>> names like Jaton, HP, Dell etc.
>>
>> Are all these cards interchangeable? Do they
>> differ in driver, in output cables or format
>> (VGA vs DVI)? Do you know of a reliable source
>> for purchase?
>
> Have a look at www.newegg.com - there will be pictures for the cards
> that will show the outputs. I haven't checked, but it may be possible
> to get different combinations of ports, such as S-Video output, VGA,
> DVI, etc. In my experience they all use the standard Nvidia drivers so
> the brand doesn't matter in that respect.

I'd agree with that. You want to be more curious about the
output options, and whether they are sufficient for your needs.

If you have an old CRT monitor, there may be less to worry about.
VGA connectors, with good analog capabilities, are easy to find.
If you have an LCD, it could have an analog input (VGA), a digital
input (DVI) or both. Depending on the age of the video card,
there may not be a DVI connector, and no digital output. Or,
there may be resolution restrictions on the DVI connector.

Your video card slot on the A7N8X-X is pretty universal. The "keys" cut
in the video card, are what is used to ensure there is agreement on
voltages. If the card fits in the slot, it should be safe. There
are exceptions to that rule, but the exceptions should be getting
harder and harder to find, as time passes. This overview article
should help.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/agpcompat/agp.html

There are 136 AGP 4X/8X video cards in this list. Many are duplicates and
are made by different manufacturers. The prices vary slightly on the
duplicates, as the RAM used may be different brands, and the manufacturer
may have been able to save a few dimes here and there. For the more
expensive cards, the ones that break more often, the warranty details
may factor into the purchase decision. For a $50 card, you may not care
too much about the warranty, as the expense of shipping the card around
may not make it worthwhile to fix or seek a warranty replacement.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=2010380048+1069609639&Configurator=&Subcategory=48

In this example card, you get to see the results of going too cheap.

ASUS A9250/TD/128 Radeon 9250 128MB 64-bit DDR AGP 4X/8X Video Card
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductReview.aspx?Item=N82E16814121525

To understand why some of the people have problems with the DVI output, you
need to look at this article first.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dvi

In this picture, you can see some of the connector variations.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fb/DVI_Connector_Types.svg/181px-DVI_Connector_Types.svg.png

That Asus card has a DVI-D connector. It carries only digital signals.
The Asus card has a VGA connector, so there is an analog output. If you
wanted to use two monitors, one would be analog and the other one would have
to use the digital-only connector.

Most video cards with DVI connectors, will be DVI-I. The DVI-I connector
has both analog and digital signals on it. The analog signals are on the
"four dot" end. If the "four dots" are missing, there are no analog signals
on the DVI connector.

To get at the available analog signals on the DVI-I connector, you use
one of these. It picks up the signals from the "four dots" end and puts
it in the familiar 15 pin VGA connector format. So for the majority of
video cards, if you see a DVI-I connector, then a DVI-VGA adapter can be
used to run an analog monitor, like a CRT.

http://www.cooltechpc.com/ctpc/images/dvi-vga.jpg
http://www.cooltechpc.com/ctpc/images/vga.jpg

To save on future discomfort, it is a good idea to get a card with the
DVI-VGA adapter included in the box. It is one less thing to have to shop
for at the last minute, when you get a new monitor, or a friend comes over
and needs their monitor tested.

Anyway, back to that cheap Asus card. A DVI-VGA adapter won't fit. You
would not discover that, unless you looked closely at the connector. In
the picture here, you can see the "four dot" end is deficient.

http://images10.newegg.com/NeweggImage/productimage/14-121-525-08.jpg

I picked this picture next, to illustrate a card with a dual link DVI
connector. The way I can tell, is the arrow they drew next to the
connector, because otherwise I wouldn't have been able to guess :-)
Dual link DVI can drive a digital monitor like an Apple 30".
With the two connectors, you could drive one monitor with the VGA
connector (analog signals), while the DVI-I dual link would be
able to drive the 30" screen.

http://images10.newegg.com/NeweggImage/productimage/14-241-044-02.jpg
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814241044

(A card with two dual-link-DVI could drive two 30" monitors at the
same time. This is a X1650Pro.)

http://images10.newegg.com/NeweggImage/productimage/14-241-043-02.jpg

There are other criterion I use when selecting cards. For example, if you
can see yourself using Vista in the future, and the Aero interface option,
knowing what shader support is provided might be important. There are
AGP cards that support DirectX 9 in the Newegg list, but there aren't
any DirectX 10 video cards in AGP format (yet). DirectX 10 is more
important for future gaming considerations.

http://www.techpowerup.com/gpudb/

Video card power dissipation, is important both for sizing the needed
power supply, and for helping to keep the computer cool inside. There
isn't a comprehensive source of power information, and you have to
scrounge through individual articles to find the info. Xbitlabs
has a search page, and if you use the Advanced Search and set the
"Search Using" to "All Words", then enter the video card model, as in
"7300 GT power', you can find articles like this. A 30W card is low
power, a 60W is midrange (what I have in my computer right now), while
a 120W card is typical of a high end card. For computers with limited
power supplies, and if you aren't a gamer, then a 30W card would be a good
choice.

http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/video/display/power-noise_7.html

Some video cards have a power connector on the end. For the AGP cards,
the connector type is the same as a disk drive. The connector
provides additional power, rather than trying to pull the power
through the slot connector. Seeing the connector, doesn't necessarily
mean the card draws a lot of power. It is just more convenient, if they
wanted to use +12V to run the card.

I didn't pick a "winning card" for you, because you might be price
sensitive. Maybe the MX 400 is all you need or want. It all depends
on what you plan on using for a monitor, as to whether that card
would be enough.

Paul

Benjamin Gawert
August 3rd 07, 06:45 PM
* NoSpam:

> I need a graphics card for the ASUS A7N8X-X
> motherboard. ( I do images, not gaming, not TV.)
>
> I am thinking of the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200
> or 400 card. These are listed as compatible for the
> mentioned motherboard.

Holy ****, this card is around 7 years old! Are you really sure you want
to buy such a dinosaur, especially since driver support is very likely
to end soon?

Since the A7N8X-X is a nForce2-based mainboard with AGP 8x slot you can
just get any AGP card that you want and use it in your mainboard. For
your low demaning you should look for a Geforce FX5200 or similar. They
are sold very cheaply today and probably even cheaper than still getting
a GF2MX.

Benjamin

NoSpam
August 3rd 07, 08:25 PM
"Paul" > wrote in message ...
> Victek wrote:
> >> I need a graphics card for the ASUS A7N8X-X
> >> motherboard. ( I do images, not gaming, not TV.)
> >>
> >> I am thinking of the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200
> >> or 400 card. These are listed as compatible for the
> >> mentioned motherboard.
> >>
> >> What confuses me and for which I am seeking ad-
> >> vice is that the described card is offered under
> >> names like Jaton, HP, Dell etc.
> >>
> >> Are all these cards interchangeable? Do they
> >> differ in driver, in output cables or format
> >> (VGA vs DVI)? Do you know of a reliable source
> >> for purchase?
> >
> > Have a look at www.newegg.com - there will be pictures for the cards
> > that will show the outputs. I haven't checked, but it may be possible
> > to get different combinations of ports, such as S-Video output, VGA,
> > DVI, etc. In my experience they all use the standard Nvidia drivers so
> > the brand doesn't matter in that respect.
>
> I'd agree with that. You want to be more curious about the
> output options, and whether they are sufficient for your needs.
>
> If you have an old CRT monitor, there may be less to worry about.
> VGA connectors, with good analog capabilities, are easy to find.
> If you have an LCD, it could have an analog input (VGA), a digital
> input (DVI) or both. Depending on the age of the video card,
> there may not be a DVI connector, and no digital output. Or,
> there may be resolution restrictions on the DVI connector.
>
> Your video card slot on the A7N8X-X is pretty universal. The "keys" cut
> in the video card, are what is used to ensure there is agreement on
> voltages. If the card fits in the slot, it should be safe. There
> are exceptions to that rule, but the exceptions should be getting
> harder and harder to find, as time passes. This overview article
> should help.
>
> http://www.playtool.com/pages/agpcompat/agp.html
>
> There are 136 AGP 4X/8X video cards in this list. Many are duplicates and
> are made by different manufacturers. The prices vary slightly on the
> duplicates, as the RAM used may be different brands, and the manufacturer
> may have been able to save a few dimes here and there. For the more
> expensive cards, the ones that break more often, the warranty details
> may factor into the purchase decision. For a $50 card, you may not care
> too much about the warranty, as the expense of shipping the card around
> may not make it worthwhile to fix or seek a warranty replacement.
>
>
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=2010380048+1069609639&Configurator=&Subcategory=48
>
> In this example card, you get to see the results of going too cheap.
>
> ASUS A9250/TD/128 Radeon 9250 128MB 64-bit DDR AGP 4X/8X Video Card
> http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductReview.aspx?Item=N82E16814121525
>
> To understand why some of the people have problems with the DVI output,
you
> need to look at this article first.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dvi
>
> In this picture, you can see some of the connector variations.
>
>
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fb/DVI_Connector_Types.svg/181px-DVI_Connector_Types.svg.png
>
> That Asus card has a DVI-D connector. It carries only digital signals.
> The Asus card has a VGA connector, so there is an analog output. If you
> wanted to use two monitors, one would be analog and the other one would
have
> to use the digital-only connector.
>
> Most video cards with DVI connectors, will be DVI-I. The DVI-I connector
> has both analog and digital signals on it. The analog signals are on the
> "four dot" end. If the "four dots" are missing, there are no analog
signals
> on the DVI connector.
>
> To get at the available analog signals on the DVI-I connector, you use
> one of these. It picks up the signals from the "four dots" end and puts
> it in the familiar 15 pin VGA connector format. So for the majority of
> video cards, if you see a DVI-I connector, then a DVI-VGA adapter can be
> used to run an analog monitor, like a CRT.
>
> http://www.cooltechpc.com/ctpc/images/dvi-vga.jpg
> http://www.cooltechpc.com/ctpc/images/vga.jpg
>
> To save on future discomfort, it is a good idea to get a card with the
> DVI-VGA adapter included in the box. It is one less thing to have to shop
> for at the last minute, when you get a new monitor, or a friend comes over
> and needs their monitor tested.
>
> Anyway, back to that cheap Asus card. A DVI-VGA adapter won't fit. You
> would not discover that, unless you looked closely at the connector. In
> the picture here, you can see the "four dot" end is deficient.
>
> http://images10.newegg.com/NeweggImage/productimage/14-121-525-08.jpg
>
> I picked this picture next, to illustrate a card with a dual link DVI
> connector. The way I can tell, is the arrow they drew next to the
> connector, because otherwise I wouldn't have been able to guess :-)
> Dual link DVI can drive a digital monitor like an Apple 30".
> With the two connectors, you could drive one monitor with the VGA
> connector (analog signals), while the DVI-I dual link would be
> able to drive the 30" screen.
>
> http://images10.newegg.com/NeweggImage/productimage/14-241-044-02.jpg
> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814241044
>
> (A card with two dual-link-DVI could drive two 30" monitors at the
> same time. This is a X1650Pro.)
>
> http://images10.newegg.com/NeweggImage/productimage/14-241-043-02.jpg
>
> There are other criterion I use when selecting cards. For example, if you
> can see yourself using Vista in the future, and the Aero interface option,
> knowing what shader support is provided might be important. There are
> AGP cards that support DirectX 9 in the Newegg list, but there aren't
> any DirectX 10 video cards in AGP format (yet). DirectX 10 is more
> important for future gaming considerations.
>
> http://www.techpowerup.com/gpudb/
>
> Video card power dissipation, is important both for sizing the needed
> power supply, and for helping to keep the computer cool inside. There
> isn't a comprehensive source of power information, and you have to
> scrounge through individual articles to find the info. Xbitlabs
> has a search page, and if you use the Advanced Search and set the
> "Search Using" to "All Words", then enter the video card model, as in
> "7300 GT power', you can find articles like this. A 30W card is low
> power, a 60W is midrange (what I have in my computer right now), while
> a 120W card is typical of a high end card. For computers with limited
> power supplies, and if you aren't a gamer, then a 30W card would be a good
> choice.
>
> http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/video/display/power-noise_7.html
>
> Some video cards have a power connector on the end. For the AGP cards,
> the connector type is the same as a disk drive. The connector
> provides additional power, rather than trying to pull the power
> through the slot connector. Seeing the connector, doesn't necessarily
> mean the card draws a lot of power. It is just more convenient, if they
> wanted to use +12V to run the card.
>
> I didn't pick a "winning card" for you, because you might be price
> sensitive. Maybe the MX 400 is all you need or want. It all depends
> on what you plan on using for a monitor, as to whether that card
> would be enough.
>
> Paul

I thank you for your detailed info. It will take me some time to look into
it. In the meantime I wish to say that I am currently using a Mitsubishi
Diamond Pro 920 19inch monitor. I am thinking of getting a good LCD
in the future. I definitely do not need what is called three D performance
and fast action. I need good color and good resolution.

Another point is, that my image processing PC is not connected to the
net. It uses Win2k with Service Pack 4 and no updates. I have Direct
X 8.1 on it. I think and I hope that I am correct, that for my imaging
purposes I do not need late issues of Direct X. These all have to do
with creating images under various pixel generation algorithms. I do
not need the card to fill in anything. I generate still computer generated
images and I process my microphotographs only which come from
a single lens reflex digital camera.

Thank you for your help. If you have further suggestions please let
me know.

GR.

NoSpam
August 3rd 07, 08:25 PM
"Benjamin Gawert" > wrote in message
...
> * NoSpam:
>
> > I need a graphics card for the ASUS A7N8X-X
> > motherboard. ( I do images, not gaming, not TV.)
> >
> > I am thinking of the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200
> > or 400 card. These are listed as compatible for the
> > mentioned motherboard.
>
> Holy ****, this card is around 7 years old! Are you really sure you want
> to buy such a dinosaur, especially since driver support is very likely
> to end soon?
>
> Since the A7N8X-X is a nForce2-based mainboard with AGP 8x slot you can
> just get any AGP card that you want and use it in your mainboard. For
> your low demaning you should look for a Geforce FX5200 or similar. They
> are sold very cheaply today and probably even cheaper than still getting
> a GF2MX.
>
> Benjamin

Let me explain my reasons for getting a dinosaur graphics card.

I have put an ATI Rage 128 Pro Ultra VGP card on the A7N8X-X
and tried to install the proper driver for this card and my Win2000
OS. The driver comes from the AMD site and is file w2kr128513013279.
This is without doubt the proper file for a Rage 128 Pro and according
to my understanding for the ULTRA as well. However installing
the driver failed because I get a message to the effect that this driver
will
not work with my hardware. I spent one day trying all kinds of variations
on the theme and had no luck.

I then looked on the CD for this MB and found a lot of drivers for various
cards, among which were the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200 and 400 cards.
For this reason I figured that these cards would work.

Now since you tell me that other cards will work, may be I should look
into them. I feel however that to display images and work on them in Photo-
shop and not doing games or movies, almost any card will do. Currently I
use a fancy Mitsubishi display, but I wish to plan for an LCD.

Thank you for your work and any other ideas you might have.
GR.

Augustus
August 3rd 07, 08:46 PM
> I then looked on the CD for this MB and found a lot of drivers for various
> cards, among which were the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200 and 400 cards.
> For this reason I figured that these cards would work.
>
> Now since you tell me that other cards will work, may be I should look
> into them. I feel however that to display images and work on them in
> Photo-
> shop and not doing games or movies, almost any card will do. Currently I
> use a fancy Mitsubishi display, but I wish to plan for an LCD

Your logic here in choosing a ancient video card based on using the the
drivers supplied on a 7 year old m/b driver CD is really odd. Any modern low
end AGP Nvidia or ATI based card will perform flawlessly in that m/b and
cost about $40. If you wish to plan for an LCD don't go with a dinosaur
card. If I was doing exclusively Photoshop, I wouldn't be looking for a
Gefroce2MX200 or 400 card. Photoshop CS2 is known to have perfromance issues
with older video cards.
http://avondale.typepad.com/pixelupdate/2005/05/photoshop_cs2_p.html

NoSpam
August 3rd 07, 09:25 PM
"Augustus" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> > I then looked on the CD for this MB and found a lot of drivers for
various
> > cards, among which were the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200 and 400 cards.
> > For this reason I figured that these cards would work.
> >
> > Now since you tell me that other cards will work, may be I should look
> > into them. I feel however that to display images and work on them in
> > Photo-
> > shop and not doing games or movies, almost any card will do. Currently I
> > use a fancy Mitsubishi display, but I wish to plan for an LCD
>
> Your logic here in choosing a ancient video card based on using the the
> drivers supplied on a 7 year old m/b driver CD is really odd. Any modern
low
> end AGP Nvidia or ATI based card will perform flawlessly in that m/b and
> cost about $40. If you wish to plan for an LCD don't go with a dinosaur
> card. If I was doing exclusively Photoshop, I wouldn't be looking for a
> Gefroce2MX200 or 400 card. Photoshop CS2 is known to have perfromance
issues
> with older video cards.
> http://avondale.typepad.com/pixelupdate/2005/05/photoshop_cs2_p.html
>
>

Hello,

I have looked at the above link. I am afraid for people who need to use
camera raw files CS2 is the only choice. The program is terribly bloated.
Many agree with that statement..

Now since you know what I need to do on my PC and know the mother-
board and the OS, what graphics card would you propose that allows me
to use my current monitor, Mitshubishi Diamond Pro and will later allow
connection to an LCD panel? Again I do no gaming, no movies, no TV.
Strictly images up to 5000 by 5000 pixels.

GR.

Benjamin Gawert
August 3rd 07, 09:32 PM
* NoSpam:

> Let me explain my reasons for getting a dinosaur graphics card.
>
> I have put an ATI Rage 128 Pro Ultra VGP card on the A7N8X-X
> and tried to install the proper driver for this card and my Win2000
> OS. The driver comes from the AMD site and is file w2kr128513013279.
> This is without doubt the proper file for a Rage 128 Pro and according
> to my understanding for the ULTRA as well. However installing
> the driver failed because I get a message to the effect that this driver
> will
> not work with my hardware. I spent one day trying all kinds of variations
> on the theme and had no luck.

There were dozens of versions of the ancient Rage128 card available -
around a decade ago! This card is from the early Pentium2 aera, you
definitely don't want that on a mobo like yours any more! Besides that
the Rage drivers were just plain crap. Only after ATI came out with the
Radeon line of gfx cards which uses unified drivers the driver quality
got much better.

BTW: the Rage128 series was one of the few gfx card series that
contained cards that were incorrectly coded for AGP4x but only supported
3.3v signalling voltage, resulting in killing AGP4x/8x mobos that don't
have a protection circuit!

I really wonder why you want to use a 1997/1998 aera card in a ~1993
aera mainboard.

> I then looked on the CD for this MB and found a lot of drivers for various
> cards, among which were the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200 and 400 cards.
> For this reason I figured that these cards would work.

Sorry, but that's silly. These drivers were already outdated when your
mobo was new, and besides that they do support other Nvidia cards as
well (Nvidia like ATI now uses unified drivers for all their cards, so
the driver on your CD will probably support other Nvidia cards, too).
Since the drivers are very old they might have bugs and issues with
somewhat newer applications as well. That's why there are driver updates.

> Now since you tell me that other cards will work, may be I should look
> into them. I feel however that to display images and work on them in Photo-
> shop and not doing games or movies, almost any card will do. Currently I
> use a fancy Mitsubishi display, but I wish to plan for an LCD.

Just more reasons to go for a somewhat current card.

Benjamin

NoSpam
August 3rd 07, 10:10 PM
----- Original Message -----
From: "Benjamin Gawert" >
Newsgroups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia
Sent: Friday, August 03, 2007 1:32 PM
Subject: Re: About NVIDIA GeForce2 MX200


> * NoSpam:
>
> > Let me explain my reasons for getting a dinosaur graphics card.
> >
> > I have put an ATI Rage 128 Pro Ultra VGP card on the A7N8X-X
> > and tried to install the proper driver for this card and my Win2000
> > OS. The driver comes from the AMD site and is file w2kr128513013279.
> > This is without doubt the proper file for a Rage 128 Pro and according
> > to my understanding for the ULTRA as well. However installing
> > the driver failed because I get a message to the effect that this driver
> > will
> > not work with my hardware. I spent one day trying all kinds of
variations
> > on the theme and had no luck.
>
> There were dozens of versions of the ancient Rage128 card available -
> around a decade ago! This card is from the early Pentium2 aera, you
> definitely don't want that on a mobo like yours any more! Besides that
> the Rage drivers were just plain crap. Only after ATI came out with the
> Radeon line of gfx cards which uses unified drivers the driver quality
> got much better.
>
> BTW: the Rage128 series was one of the few gfx card series that
> contained cards that were incorrectly coded for AGP4x but only supported
> 3.3v signalling voltage, resulting in killing AGP4x/8x mobos that don't
> have a protection circuit!
>
> I really wonder why you want to use a 1997/1998 aera card in a ~1993
> aera mainboard.
>
> > I then looked on the CD for this MB and found a lot of drivers for
various
> > cards, among which were the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200 and 400 cards.
> > For this reason I figured that these cards would work.
>
> Sorry, but that's silly. These drivers were already outdated when your
> mobo was new, and besides that they do support other Nvidia cards as
> well (Nvidia like ATI now uses unified drivers for all their cards, so
> the driver on your CD will probably support other Nvidia cards, too).
> Since the drivers are very old they might have bugs and issues with
> somewhat newer applications as well. That's why there are driver updates.
>
> > Now since you tell me that other cards will work, may be I should look
> > into them. I feel however that to display images and work on them in
Photo-
> > shop and not doing games or movies, almost any card will do. Currently I
> > use a fancy Mitsubishi display, but I wish to plan for an LCD.
>
> Just more reasons to go for a somewhat current card.
>
> Benjamin

"Benjamin Gawert" > wrote in message
...
> * NoSpam:
>
> > Let me explain my reasons for getting a dinosaur graphics card.
> >
> > I have put an ATI Rage 128 Pro Ultra VGP card on the A7N8X-X
> > and tried to install the proper driver for this card and my Win2000
> > OS. The driver comes from the AMD site and is file w2kr128513013279.
> > This is without doubt the proper file for a Rage 128 Pro and according
> > to my understanding for the ULTRA as well. However installing
> > the driver failed because I get a message to the effect that this driver
> > will
> > not work with my hardware. I spent one day trying all kinds of
variations
> > on the theme and had no luck.
>
> There were dozens of versions of the ancient Rage128 card available -
> around a decade ago! This card is from the early Pentium2 aera, you
> definitely don't want that on a mobo like yours any more! Besides that
> the Rage drivers were just plain crap. Only after ATI came out with the
> Radeon line of gfx cards which uses unified drivers the driver quality
> got much better.
>
> BTW: the Rage128 series was one of the few gfx card series that
> contained cards that were incorrectly coded for AGP4x but only supported
> 3.3v signalling voltage, resulting in killing AGP4x/8x mobos that don't
> have a protection circuit!
>
> I really wonder why you want to use a 1997/1998 aera card in a ~1993
> aera mainboard.
>
> > I then looked on the CD for this MB and found a lot of drivers for
various
> > cards, among which were the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200 and 400 cards.
> > For this reason I figured that these cards would work.
>
> Sorry, but that's silly. These drivers were already outdated when your
> mobo was new, and besides that they do support other Nvidia cards as
> well (Nvidia like ATI now uses unified drivers for all their cards, so
> the driver on your CD will probably support other Nvidia cards, too).
> Since the drivers are very old they might have bugs and issues with
> somewhat newer applications as well. That's why there are driver updates.
>
> > Now since you tell me that other cards will work, may be I should look
> > into them. I feel however that to display images and work on them in
Photo-
> > shop and not doing games or movies, almost any card will do. Currently I
> > use a fancy Mitsubishi display, but I wish to plan for an LCD.
>
> Just more reasons to go for a somewhat current card.
>
> Benjamin

Well Benjamin,

Thank you so much and I am glad I found knowledgable people to
help. It is true that my motherboard CD lists some 38 cards which
are compatible and it gives the drivers for them. It is also true that
drivers will have been updated, but the list is of value because it gives
compatible video cards. The question is which card should I use which
meets my requirements? Do you have any ideas?

I am enclosing the mentioned list. I am open to all suggestions, that is
why I turned to this group. I think that using any card newer than the
ones listed may, just may be asking for problems.

Here is the list:

NVIDIA Display Driver for Windows 2000/XP
version 41.13, 12/27/2002

Operating systems supported
---------------------------
Microsoft Windows XP Home
Microsoft Windows 2000/XP Professional
Microsoft Windows 2000 Server

Adapters supported
------------------
NVIDIA RIVA TNT
NVIDIA RIVA TNT2
NVIDIA RIVA TNT2 Pro
NVIDIA RIVA TNT2 Ultra
NVIDIA Vanta
NVIDIA Vanta LT
NVIDIA RIVA TNT2 Model 64
NVIDIA RIVA TNT2 Model 64 Pro
NVIDIA Aladdin TNT2
NVIDIA GeForce 256
NVIDIA GeForce DDR
NVIDIA Quadro
NVIDIA GeForce2 MX
NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200
NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 400
NVIDIA Quadro2 MXR
NVIDIA Quadro2 EX
NVIDIA GeForce2 GTS
NVIDIA GeForce2 Pro
NVIDIA GeForce2 Ultra
NVIDIA Quadro2 Pro
NVIDIA GeForce4 MX 420
NVIDIA GeForce4 MX 440
NVIDIA GeForce4 MX 460
NVIDIA Quadro4 200NVS
NVIDIA Quadro4 400NVS
NVIDIA Quadro4 500XGL
NVIDIA Quadro4 550XGL
NVIDIA GeForce3
NVIDIA GeForce3 Ti 200
NVIDIA GeForce3 Ti 500
NVIDIA Quadro DCC
NVIDIA GeForce4 Ti 4200
NVIDIA GeForce4 Ti 4400
NVIDIA GeForce4 Ti 4600
NVIDIA Quadro4 700XGL
NVIDIA Quadro4 750XGL
NVIDIA Quadro4 900XGL

Thank you
GR.

NoSpam
August 3rd 07, 10:14 PM
"Paul" > wrote in message ...
> Victek wrote:
> >> I need a graphics card for the ASUS A7N8X-X
> >> motherboard. ( I do images, not gaming, not TV.)
> >>
> >> I am thinking of the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200
> >> or 400 card. These are listed as compatible for the
> >> mentioned motherboard.
> >>
> >> What confuses me and for which I am seeking ad-
> >> vice is that the described card is offered under
> >> names like Jaton, HP, Dell etc.
> >>
> >> Are all these cards interchangeable? Do they
> >> differ in driver, in output cables or format
> >> (VGA vs DVI)? Do you know of a reliable source
> >> for purchase?
> >
> > Have a look at www.newegg.com - there will be pictures for the cards
> > that will show the outputs. I haven't checked, but it may be possible
> > to get different combinations of ports, such as S-Video output, VGA,
> > DVI, etc. In my experience they all use the standard Nvidia drivers so
> > the brand doesn't matter in that respect.
>
> I'd agree with that. You want to be more curious about the
> output options, and whether they are sufficient for your needs.
>
> If you have an old CRT monitor, there may be less to worry about.
> VGA connectors, with good analog capabilities, are easy to find.
> If you have an LCD, it could have an analog input (VGA), a digital
> input (DVI) or both. Depending on the age of the video card,
> there may not be a DVI connector, and no digital output. Or,
> there may be resolution restrictions on the DVI connector.
>
> Your video card slot on the A7N8X-X is pretty universal. The "keys" cut
> in the video card, are what is used to ensure there is agreement on
> voltages. If the card fits in the slot, it should be safe. There
> are exceptions to that rule, but the exceptions should be getting
> harder and harder to find, as time passes. This overview article
> should help.
>
> http://www.playtool.com/pages/agpcompat/agp.html
>
> There are 136 AGP 4X/8X video cards in this list. Many are duplicates and
> are made by different manufacturers. The prices vary slightly on the
> duplicates, as the RAM used may be different brands, and the manufacturer
> may have been able to save a few dimes here and there. For the more
> expensive cards, the ones that break more often, the warranty details
> may factor into the purchase decision. For a $50 card, you may not care
> too much about the warranty, as the expense of shipping the card around
> may not make it worthwhile to fix or seek a warranty replacement.
>
>
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=2010380048+1069609639&Configurator=&Subcategory=48
>
> In this example card, you get to see the results of going too cheap.
>
> ASUS A9250/TD/128 Radeon 9250 128MB 64-bit DDR AGP 4X/8X Video Card
> http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductReview.aspx?Item=N82E16814121525
>
> To understand why some of the people have problems with the DVI output,
you
> need to look at this article first.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dvi
>
> In this picture, you can see some of the connector variations.
>
>
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fb/DVI_Connector_Types.svg/181px-DVI_Connector_Types.svg.png
>
> That Asus card has a DVI-D connector. It carries only digital signals.
> The Asus card has a VGA connector, so there is an analog output. If you
> wanted to use two monitors, one would be analog and the other one would
have
> to use the digital-only connector.
>
> Most video cards with DVI connectors, will be DVI-I. The DVI-I connector
> has both analog and digital signals on it. The analog signals are on the
> "four dot" end. If the "four dots" are missing, there are no analog
signals
> on the DVI connector.
>
> To get at the available analog signals on the DVI-I connector, you use
> one of these. It picks up the signals from the "four dots" end and puts
> it in the familiar 15 pin VGA connector format. So for the majority of
> video cards, if you see a DVI-I connector, then a DVI-VGA adapter can be
> used to run an analog monitor, like a CRT.
>
> http://www.cooltechpc.com/ctpc/images/dvi-vga.jpg
> http://www.cooltechpc.com/ctpc/images/vga.jpg
>
> To save on future discomfort, it is a good idea to get a card with the
> DVI-VGA adapter included in the box. It is one less thing to have to shop
> for at the last minute, when you get a new monitor, or a friend comes over
> and needs their monitor tested.
>
> Anyway, back to that cheap Asus card. A DVI-VGA adapter won't fit. You
> would not discover that, unless you looked closely at the connector. In
> the picture here, you can see the "four dot" end is deficient.
>
> http://images10.newegg.com/NeweggImage/productimage/14-121-525-08.jpg
>
> I picked this picture next, to illustrate a card with a dual link DVI
> connector. The way I can tell, is the arrow they drew next to the
> connector, because otherwise I wouldn't have been able to guess :-)
> Dual link DVI can drive a digital monitor like an Apple 30".
> With the two connectors, you could drive one monitor with the VGA
> connector (analog signals), while the DVI-I dual link would be
> able to drive the 30" screen.
>
> http://images10.newegg.com/NeweggImage/productimage/14-241-044-02.jpg
> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814241044
>
> (A card with two dual-link-DVI could drive two 30" monitors at the
> same time. This is a X1650Pro.)
>
> http://images10.newegg.com/NeweggImage/productimage/14-241-043-02.jpg
>
> There are other criterion I use when selecting cards. For example, if you
> can see yourself using Vista in the future, and the Aero interface option,
> knowing what shader support is provided might be important. There are
> AGP cards that support DirectX 9 in the Newegg list, but there aren't
> any DirectX 10 video cards in AGP format (yet). DirectX 10 is more
> important for future gaming considerations.
>
> http://www.techpowerup.com/gpudb/
>
> Video card power dissipation, is important both for sizing the needed
> power supply, and for helping to keep the computer cool inside. There
> isn't a comprehensive source of power information, and you have to
> scrounge through individual articles to find the info. Xbitlabs
> has a search page, and if you use the Advanced Search and set the
> "Search Using" to "All Words", then enter the video card model, as in
> "7300 GT power', you can find articles like this. A 30W card is low
> power, a 60W is midrange (what I have in my computer right now), while
> a 120W card is typical of a high end card. For computers with limited
> power supplies, and if you aren't a gamer, then a 30W card would be a good
> choice.
>
> http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/video/display/power-noise_7.html
>
> Some video cards have a power connector on the end. For the AGP cards,
> the connector type is the same as a disk drive. The connector
> provides additional power, rather than trying to pull the power
> through the slot connector. Seeing the connector, doesn't necessarily
> mean the card draws a lot of power. It is just more convenient, if they
> wanted to use +12V to run the card.
>
> I didn't pick a "winning card" for you, because you might be price
> sensitive. Maybe the MX 400 is all you need or want. It all depends
> on what you plan on using for a monitor, as to whether that card
> would be enough.
>
> Paul

Well Paul, your hints about the connectors are of great value. I am now
in a much better position to appreciate what is involved. I am not planning
on using two monitors, but I may want to use the one to one pixel corre-
spondence between file and monitor which DVI makes possible.

I am now hoping to get some concrete suggestions regarding a good
choice of adapter.

Thank you
GR.

Augustus
August 3rd 07, 11:24 PM
Again I do no gaming, no movies, no TV.
> Strictly images up to 5000 by 5000 pixels.
>
> GR.

If you want to go Nvidia, in the $50 range, this fanless EVGA 6200....

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130233

In the $60 range, this Diamond ATI X1050 is very good for the money. Has
some minor 3D ability too, but is also a 128bit card whereas the $50 EVGA is
a 64bit card

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814103033


There's plenty of others in this range that will do.

Bill
August 4th 07, 12:38 AM
In article <[email protected]>,
says...
>
>
<nsip>
> Hello,
>
> I have looked at the above link. I am afraid for people who need to use
> camera raw files CS2 is the only choice. The program is terribly bloated.
> Many agree with that statement..
>
> Now since you know what I need to do on my PC and know the mother-
> board and the OS, what graphics card would you propose that allows me
> to use my current monitor, Mitshubishi Diamond Pro and will later allow
> connection to an LCD panel? Again I do no gaming, no movies, no TV.
> Strictly images up to 5000 by 5000 pixels.
>
> GR.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?
Item=N82E16814130207

http://tinyurl.com/2gl9yl

This will probably fit your needs.

Bill
--
Gmail and Google Groups. This century's answer to AOL and
WebTV.

Mac Cool
August 4th 07, 05:42 AM
NoSpam:

> what graphics card

EVGA 256-A8-N341-LX GeForce 6200
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130233

--
Mac Cool

Benjamin Gawert
August 4th 07, 02:17 PM
* NoSpam:

> Thank you so much and I am glad I found knowledgable people to
> help.

You're welcome. That's what newsgroups are for.

> It is true that my motherboard CD lists some 38 cards which
> are compatible and it gives the drivers for them. It is also true that
> drivers will have been updated, but the list is of value because it gives
> compatible video cards.

Not really. It just tells you what video cards are supported by the
drivers on that CD, nothing more.

As to compatibility: your mobo is compatible with all AGP4x or AGP8x
cards, that means with every ATI Radeon and every Nvidia Geforce that
has an AGP interface. AGP is a standard.

And: methusalem cards like the ATI Rage128 should *never* be considered
to be used in such a mainboard. Never. Ever.

> The question is which card should I use which
> meets my requirements? Do you have any ideas?

Yes. Forget that list and get a modern entry level card.

> I am enclosing the mentioned list. I am open to all suggestions, that is
> why I turned to this group. I think that using any card newer than the
> ones listed may, just may be asking for problems.

Nope, it's not. You're just projecting the problems you had with an
almost 10 year old gfx card that already was a POS when it was new to
current gfx cards. But that is not the same.

I'd recommend you go for a Geforce 6200 which should be obtainable
around 50 bucks, if you want something cheaper get a Geforce FX5200 or
FX5500. All of these cards are compatible with your mobo, and all of
them fit the requirements you have. No need to hunt for outdated hardware.

Benjamin

NoSpam
August 4th 07, 04:27 PM
To all of you,

I thank you for your great and efficient help. It was a pleasure to
interact with this news group.

I have ordered a
GeForce 6200 256MB 64-bit DDR AGP 4X/8X adapter
from newegg. I had not heard of the company previously.
They have a good website.

Greetings

GR

Mr.E Solved!
August 4th 07, 10:38 PM
NoSpam wrote:
> To all of you,
>
> I thank you for your great and efficient help. It was a pleasure to
> interact with this news group.
>
> I have ordered a
> GeForce 6200 256MB 64-bit DDR AGP 4X/8X adapter
> from newegg. I had not heard of the company previously.
> They have a good website.
>
> Greetings
>
> GR

We look forward to you next PC upgrade in the year 2014. Start saving now.

NoSpam
August 5th 07, 12:22 AM
"Mr.E Solved!" > wrote in message
. ..
> NoSpam wrote:
> > To all of you,
> >
> > I thank you for your great and efficient help. It was a pleasure to
> > interact with this news group.
> >
> > I have ordered a
> > GeForce 6200 256MB 64-bit DDR AGP 4X/8X adapter
> > from newegg. I had not heard of the company previously.
> > They have a good website.
> >
> > Greetings
> >
> > GR
>
> We look forward to you next PC upgrade in the year 2014. Start saving now.

I understand your humor. But..... its not all that funny. I am an old
man and live on Soc.Security and a tiny pension.I hope to live to
2014 but I may not make it. Even if I do an upgrade then would
be too late.

Greetings

GR.

Larry Roberts
August 5th 07, 12:51 AM
On Fri, 03 Aug 2007 19:45:24 +0200, Benjamin Gawert >
wrote:

>* NoSpam:
>
>> I need a graphics card for the ASUS A7N8X-X
>> motherboard. ( I do images, not gaming, not TV.)
>>
>> I am thinking of the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200
>> or 400 card. These are listed as compatible for the
>> mentioned motherboard.
>
>Holy ****, this card is around 7 years old! Are you really sure you want
>to buy such a dinosaur, especially since driver support is very likely
>to end soon?
>
>Since the A7N8X-X is a nForce2-based mainboard with AGP 8x slot you can
>just get any AGP card that you want and use it in your mainboard. For
>your low demaning you should look for a Geforce FX5200 or similar. They
>are sold very cheaply today and probably even cheaper than still getting
>a GF2MX.
>
>Benjamin


Driver support has ended for all cards older than the 6xxx
series. The last drivers to support them is 93.71.

Mr.E Solved!
August 5th 07, 02:30 AM
NoSpam wrote:

>>> To all of you,
>>>
>>> I thank you for your great and efficient help. It was a pleasure to
>>> interact with this news group.
>>>
>>> I have ordered a
>>> GeForce 6200 256MB 64-bit DDR AGP 4X/8X adapter
>>> from newegg. I had not heard of the company previously.
>>> They have a good website.
>>>
>>> Greetings
>>>
>>> GR
>> We look forward to you next PC upgrade in the year 2014. Start saving now.
>
> I understand your humor. But..... its not all that funny. I am an old
> man and live on Soc.Security and a tiny pension.I hope to live to
> 2014 but I may not make it. Even if I do an upgrade then would
> be too late.
>
> Greetings
>
> GR.

Well good for you, you old so and so! There are lots of smart folk in
this group, just avoid anything written by DaveW...he goes a lil bit
crazy sometimes. (I think it's the drinky drinky)

But, please tell us you did not get a TC or 'Turbo Cache' version of the
6200? I only mention this since that model of card, while wonderfully
mediocre and completely non-compelling in any way, is priced right and
can get the job done, in time. Just be aware that it can and will
allocate system memory to help with the video memory if needed and that
extra step can cause system headaches. Just be aware of that if anything
wonky happens after you install it, that could be a reason (the turbo
cache feature).

And from what I heard about you, NoSpam, is that you will be with us for
a very long time. Only the good die young. :)

NoSpam
August 8th 07, 01:37 AM
To all who helped with constructive comments!

New EVGA e-GeForce 6200 received, installed and running.
No Problems.

Thank you

GR.


"Larry Roberts" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 03 Aug 2007 19:45:24 +0200, Benjamin Gawert >
> wrote:
>
> >* NoSpam:
> >
> >> I need a graphics card for the ASUS A7N8X-X
> >> motherboard. ( I do images, not gaming, not TV.)
> >>
> >> I am thinking of the NVIDIA GeForce2 MX 200
> >> or 400 card. These are listed as compatible for the
> >> mentioned motherboard.
> >
> >Holy ****, this card is around 7 years old! Are you really sure you want
> >to buy such a dinosaur, especially since driver support is very likely
> >to end soon?
> >
> >Since the A7N8X-X is a nForce2-based mainboard with AGP 8x slot you can
> >just get any AGP card that you want and use it in your mainboard. For
> >your low demaning you should look for a Geforce FX5200 or similar. They
> >are sold very cheaply today and probably even cheaper than still getting
> >a GF2MX.
> >
> >Benjamin
>
>
> Driver support has ended for all cards older than the 6xxx
> series. The last drivers to support them is 93.71.

Mr.E Solved!
August 8th 07, 02:38 AM
NoSpam wrote:
> To all who helped with constructive comments!
>
> New EVGA e-GeForce 6200 received, installed and running.
> No Problems.
>
> Thank you
>
> GR.

Hey there you old horse thief, was it worth it?