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February 5th 07, 08:33 PM
Is there a benchmark program that can test my video cards memory
transfer rate?

First of One
February 6th 07, 03:23 AM
I haven't seen one. And even if such a program existed, its usefulness would
be questionable at best. Real-world performance depends on the memory
controller design. For example, a 4x32-bit "crossbar" interface is faster
than an 1x128-bit interface in most games, even though the theoretical
transfer rates are identical. Other significant factors include memory
timings, color/Z-buffer compression, and hidden-surface removal (think
Geforce 8800's Early-Z or Radeon's Hyper-Z).

On the other hand, if all you need to do is confirm, for example, your card
has a full 128-bit memory interface rather than a cut-down 64-bit "LE"
interface, then a program like Everest will tell you.

--
"War is the continuation of politics by other means.
It can therefore be said that politics is war without
bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."

> wrote in message
oups.com...
> Is there a benchmark program that can test my video cards memory
> transfer rate?
>

February 6th 07, 07:19 PM
On Feb 5, 6:23 pm, "First of One" <[email protected]> wrote:
> I haven't seen one. And even if such a program existed, its usefulness would
> be questionable at best. Real-world performance depends on the memory
> controller design. For example, a 4x32-bit "crossbar" interface is faster
> than an 1x128-bit interface in most games, even though the theoretical
> transfer rates are identical. Other significant factors include memory
> timings, color/Z-buffer compression, and hidden-surface removal (think
> Geforce 8800's Early-Z or Radeon's Hyper-Z).
>
> On the other hand, if all you need to do is confirm, for example, your card
> has a full 128-bit memory interface rather than a cut-down 64-bit "LE"
> interface, then a program like Everest will tell you.
>
> --
> "War is the continuation of politics by other means.
> It can therefore be said that politics is war without
> bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."
>
> > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
> > Is there a benchmark program that can test my video cards memory
> > transfer rate?


Ok. I just seem to see this measurement often when video cards are
compared. I didn't know if this was a common benchmark test or not.

First of One
February 7th 07, 02:05 AM
The "measurement" of memory bandwidth, as written in reviews, is always
calculated theoretically. For example, a card with a 256-bit memory
interface, with the RAM running at 1.2 GHz effective, would have 256 x 1.2 /
8 = 38 GB/s of memory bandwidth.

--
"War is the continuation of politics by other means.
It can therefore be said that politics is war without
bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."

> wrote in message
oups.com...
> On Feb 5, 6:23 pm, "First of One" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> I haven't seen one. And even if such a program existed, its usefulness
>> would
>> be questionable at best. Real-world performance depends on the memory
>> controller design. For example, a 4x32-bit "crossbar" interface is faster
>> than an 1x128-bit interface in most games, even though the theoretical
>> transfer rates are identical. Other significant factors include memory
>> timings, color/Z-buffer compression, and hidden-surface removal (think
>> Geforce 8800's Early-Z or Radeon's Hyper-Z).
>>
>> On the other hand, if all you need to do is confirm, for example, your
>> card
>> has a full 128-bit memory interface rather than a cut-down 64-bit "LE"
>> interface, then a program like Everest will tell you.
>>
>> --
>> "War is the continuation of politics by other means.
>> It can therefore be said that politics is war without
>> bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."
>>
>> > wrote in message
>>
>> oups.com...
>>
>> > Is there a benchmark program that can test my video cards memory
>> > transfer rate?
>
>
> Ok. I just seem to see this measurement often when video cards are
> compared. I didn't know if this was a common benchmark test or not.
>

February 7th 07, 06:41 PM
On Feb 6, 5:05 pm, "First of One" <[email protected]> wrote:
> The "measurement" of memory bandwidth, as written in reviews, is always
> calculated theoretically. For example, a card with a 256-bit memory
> interface, with the RAM running at 1.2 GHz effective, would have 256 x 1.2 /
> 8 = 38 GB/s of memory bandwidth.
>
> --
> "War is the continuation of politics by other means.
> It can therefore be said that politics is war without
> bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."
>
> > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
> > On Feb 5, 6:23 pm, "First of One" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >> I haven't seen one. And even if such a program existed, its usefulness
> >> would
> >> be questionable at best. Real-world performance depends on the memory
> >> controller design. For example, a 4x32-bit "crossbar" interface is faster
> >> than an 1x128-bit interface in most games, even though the theoretical
> >> transfer rates are identical. Other significant factors include memory
> >> timings, color/Z-buffer compression, and hidden-surface removal (think
> >> Geforce 8800's Early-Z or Radeon's Hyper-Z).
>
> >> On the other hand, if all you need to do is confirm, for example, your
> >> card
> >> has a full 128-bit memory interface rather than a cut-down 64-bit "LE"
> >> interface, then a program like Everest will tell you.
>
> >> --
> >> "War is the continuation of politics by other means.
> >> It can therefore be said that politics is war without
> >> bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."
>
> >> > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
> >> > Is there a benchmark program that can test my video cards memory
> >> > transfer rate?
>
> > Ok. I just seem to see this measurement often when video cards are
> > compared. I didn't know if this was a common benchmark test or not.

Oh, got it. Makes sense now. Is there a small simple program to
benchmark video cards? I only see the larger 3DMark, etc.

First of One
February 9th 07, 07:24 AM
I am sure there are small simple programs. However, again, such benchmarks
bear no resemblance to real-world gameplay. Even the large 3DMark suite
stopped being realistic after the 2001 edition.

There's a burn-in function in ATiTool, with a frame-per-second display.
Consider it the simplest benchmark available. :-)

--
"War is the continuation of politics by other means.
It can therefore be said that politics is war without
bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."

> wrote in message
oups.com...
> On Feb 6, 5:05 pm, "First of One" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> The "measurement" of memory bandwidth, as written in reviews, is always
>> calculated theoretically. For example, a card with a 256-bit memory
>> interface, with the RAM running at 1.2 GHz effective, would have 256 x
>> 1.2 /
>> 8 = 38 GB/s of memory bandwidth.
>>
>> --
>> "War is the continuation of politics by other means.
>> It can therefore be said that politics is war without
>> bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."
>>
>> > wrote in message
>>
>> oups.com...
>>
>> > On Feb 5, 6:23 pm, "First of One" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> >> I haven't seen one. And even if such a program existed, its usefulness
>> >> would
>> >> be questionable at best. Real-world performance depends on the memory
>> >> controller design. For example, a 4x32-bit "crossbar" interface is
>> >> faster
>> >> than an 1x128-bit interface in most games, even though the theoretical
>> >> transfer rates are identical. Other significant factors include memory
>> >> timings, color/Z-buffer compression, and hidden-surface removal (think
>> >> Geforce 8800's Early-Z or Radeon's Hyper-Z).
>>
>> >> On the other hand, if all you need to do is confirm, for example, your
>> >> card
>> >> has a full 128-bit memory interface rather than a cut-down 64-bit "LE"
>> >> interface, then a program like Everest will tell you.
>>
>> >> --
>> >> "War is the continuation of politics by other means.
>> >> It can therefore be said that politics is war without
>> >> bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."
>>
>> >> > wrote in message
>>
>> oups.com...
>>
>> >> > Is there a benchmark program that can test my video cards memory
>> >> > transfer rate?
>>
>> > Ok. I just seem to see this measurement often when video cards are
>> > compared. I didn't know if this was a common benchmark test or not.
>
> Oh, got it. Makes sense now. Is there a small simple program to
> benchmark video cards? I only see the larger 3DMark, etc.
>

February 12th 07, 06:27 PM
On Feb 8, 10:24 pm, "First of One" <[email protected]> wrote:
> I am sure there are small simple programs. However, again, such benchmarks
> bear no resemblance to real-world gameplay. Even the large 3DMark suite
> stopped being realistic after the 2001 edition.
>
> There's a burn-in function in ATiTool, with a frame-per-second display.
> Consider it the simplest benchmark available. :-)
>
> --
> "War is the continuation of politics by other means.
> It can therefore be said that politics is war without
> bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."
>
> > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
> > On Feb 6, 5:05 pm, "First of One" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >> The "measurement" of memory bandwidth, as written in reviews, is always
> >> calculated theoretically. For example, a card with a 256-bit memory
> >> interface, with the RAM running at 1.2 GHz effective, would have 256 x
> >> 1.2 /
> >> 8 = 38 GB/s of memory bandwidth.
>
> >> --
> >> "War is the continuation of politics by other means.
> >> It can therefore be said that politics is war without
> >> bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."
>
> >> > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
> >> > On Feb 5, 6:23 pm, "First of One" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >> >> I haven't seen one. And even if such a program existed, its usefulness
> >> >> would
> >> >> be questionable at best. Real-world performance depends on the memory
> >> >> controller design. For example, a 4x32-bit "crossbar" interface is
> >> >> faster
> >> >> than an 1x128-bit interface in most games, even though the theoretical
> >> >> transfer rates are identical. Other significant factors include memory
> >> >> timings, color/Z-buffer compression, and hidden-surface removal (think
> >> >> Geforce 8800's Early-Z or Radeon's Hyper-Z).
>
> >> >> On the other hand, if all you need to do is confirm, for example, your
> >> >> card
> >> >> has a full 128-bit memory interface rather than a cut-down 64-bit "LE"
> >> >> interface, then a program like Everest will tell you.
>
> >> >> --
> >> >> "War is the continuation of politics by other means.
> >> >> It can therefore be said that politics is war without
> >> >> bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."
>
> >> >> > wrote in message
>
> >> oups.com...
>
> >> >> > Is there a benchmark program that can test my video cards memory
> >> >> > transfer rate?
>
> >> > Ok. I just seem to see this measurement often when video cards are
> >> > compared. I didn't know if this was a common benchmark test or not.
>
> > Oh, got it. Makes sense now. Is there a small simple program to
> > benchmark video cards? I only see the larger 3DMark, etc.

Sweet, thanks.