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View Full Version : Re: Does anyone use their computers under 100% stress in a 90F degrees environment?


June 19th 06, 01:58 PM
wrote:
> Hello.
>
> I am just wondering when you guys build computers. Are you able to keep the computers
> stable and not breaking (e.g., a SeaSonic PSU overheated) in a room that is about 90
> degrees(F) during heat waves with no air conditions? Computers would be crunching big time
> like gaming in this heat. No fancy water cooling setups in the computer cases and no opened
> cases either.
>
> I am just wondering and trying to determine what's the best way to keep my boxes stable in
> a very hot room (almost like heated indoor garages). In the past, I have seen my computer's
> Athlon 64 3200+ (754) CPU go over 160F degrees and ASUS K8V SE Deluxe motherboard go over
> 120F degrees.
>
> Thank you in advance. :)

90 F is 32 C. These temperatures are resonably common in tropical
countries (e.g. Malaysia) and many people there don't use aircons in
their homes. They do have fans of course so there is an inroom airflow.
However I suspect this doesn't make that much difference for the case
temp. Their computers survive. So so should yours... Just make sure
your CPU fan is working and your preferbly have at least one
ventilation fan and one blowing fan in your comp.

N.B. Some companies (Intel is one I recall), rather bizzarrely suggest
25 C or so maximum ambient temperatures for their products. These
companies are therefore rather bizzarrely suggesting that you should
not run your comp in many countries without an airconditioned room.

kony
June 19th 06, 04:53 PM
On 19 Jun 2006 05:58:57 -0700, wrote:


>N.B. Some companies (Intel is one I recall), rather bizzarrely suggest
>25 C or so maximum ambient temperatures for their products. These
>companies are therefore rather bizzarrely suggesting that you should
>not run your comp in many countries without an airconditioned room.


It's not bizarre at all, they're familiar with the typical
OEM chassis cooling that is tailored towards lowest noise
with fewest fans possible, which leaves lower margin, plus
Intel among others would like to avoid spending extra $$ to
include a more efficient heatsink with retail packaged CPUs.

How is it a justification that if someone, somewhere,
suffers through very hot weather, that others should too?
There are also people starving in the world, is that a
justification for others to starve too? There is every
reason to take advantage of modern conveniences such as A/C
as well as other conveniences such as a computer/gaming.

If the central AC is old and inefficient then a basic 5K BTU
window unit would be quite a bit better than nothing.

Mxsmanic
June 20th 06, 03:16 AM
writes:

> 90 F is 32 C. These temperatures are resonably common in tropical
> countries (e.g. Malaysia) and many people there don't use aircons in
> their homes.

Actually they do, if they can possibly afford it. Tropical countries
are leading users of air conditioning, for obvious reasons.

> They do have fans of course so there is an inroom airflow.

That won't lower the temperature in the room; in fact, it does just
the opposite.

> However I suspect this doesn't make that much difference for the case
> temp. Their computers survive.

The hotter the computer, the shorter its lifetime.

> N.B. Some companies (Intel is one I recall), rather bizzarrely suggest
> 25 C or so maximum ambient temperatures for their products.

I don't blame them. I suggest 20 C.

> These companies are therefore rather bizzarrely suggesting that you should
> not run your comp in many countries without an airconditioned room.

I agree with them.

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