PDA

View Full Version : Strange reboot problem on Asus A8N-SLI w/ A64 3800+ running XP


Andrew Krieg
May 31st 06, 03:00 AM
My A64 system has been super reliable for the last year. Recently I
discoverd this strange quirk that causes the system to reboot every
time. I am running WinXP SP2. One of the programs I use is a terminal
emulator called NetTerm (version 4.2.c). If I do a text paste into that
program (or Cntl-V paste), the computer does a hard reboot. Here is the
message in the Event Viewer:

System Error, Category (102), Event ID 103

Error code 100000d1, parameter1 00000004, parameter2 00000002,
parameter3 00000001, paramter4 efefdd86.

I use this emulator on a variety of other systems (Dell laptops, Abit
motherboard with Thunderbird chip, etc.) all running XP, and don't have
the reboot problem on them, only the A64 Asus system.

Any ideas on the culprit and how to fix?

--
=__ __ __ _ __ _= Andrew Krieg - Professional Newsgroup Junkie =
=_ __ _ __ _ _ __= =
=_ _ _ ___= E-mail: =
=_ __ _ __ _ __ _= WWW: http://my.execpc.com/~krieg =

Ken
May 31st 06, 10:12 AM
If you search Google on the error code you will get info. The important
part is the Filename associated with the shutdown which which is
typically corrupt or contains a bug.

Corruption can occasionally happen. Even your hard drive spec shows
information about the likelihood of random corruption.

Software problem that affect hardware come from three categories:
- Windows
- Drivers
- Application

For the user that is unsure of the source of his problems, the easy way
to try to repair is bottom up on the list above. And the best solution
is to installment and then reinstall. This hopefully removes the files
from the drive and the reinstall will not bypass replacement of existing
files.

Drivers would be those associated with the activities the application
uses. The most typical is video and often the read-me info for the
driver will detail that a fix for the application is part of the update.

Windows can have problems introduced by the automatic updates windows
defaults a system too. Occasionally, MS will make the world a worse
place than it was. If the problem arises after a Windows update, it is
a good idea to backtrack there first.

You can also check with the vendor when a single application causes the
problem. They may have resolved the issue for others and can fast-track
such fixes for folks.

With blue screens in general, Google should always be the first place
one looks. Asking here may get you the correct answer but Google will
typically give you more reliable information and often the search can
also relate to things like the application in use to give you the right
info without a long dialog in the group that may or may not resolve
one's issue.

Ken
May 31st 06, 10:15 AM
If you search Google on the error code you will get info. The important
part is the Filename associated with the shutdown which which is
typically corrupt or contains a bug.

Corruption can occasionally happen. Even your hard drive spec shows
information about the likelihood of random corruption.

Software problem that affect hardware come from three categories:
- Windows
- Drivers
- Application

For the user that is unsure of the source of his problems, the easy way
to try to repair is bottom up on the list above. And the best solution
is to installment and then reinstall. This hopefully removes the files
from the drive and the reinstall will not bypass replacement of existing
files.

Drivers would be those associated with the activities the application
uses. The most typical is video and often the read-me info for the
driver will detail that a fix for the application is part of the update.

Windows can have problems introduced by the automatic updates windows
defaults a system too. Occasionally, MS will make the world a worse
place than it was. If the problem arises after a Windows update, it is
a good idea to backtrack there first.

You can also check with the vendor when a single application causes the
problem. They may have resolved the issue for others and can fast-track
such fixes for folks.

With blue screens in general, Google should always be the first place
one looks. Asking here may get you the correct answer but Google will
typically give you more reliable information and often the search can
also relate to things like the application in use to give you the right
info without a long dialog in the group that may or may not resolve
one's issue.