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* * Chas
February 14th 06, 03:09 AM
Does anyone here know what kind of thermal paste AMD uses on the pad on
their latest heatsink/fans in the retail boxed CPUs?

I picked up a retail boxed Athlon 64 3000+ CPU with a Venice core.

The paste on the pad is silver and looks like it's either silver or
aluminum.

If it's already silver then I'll probably skip using Arctic Silver
thermal paste.

Chas.

Ed Light
February 14th 06, 04:21 AM
"Ed" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 13 Feb 2006 18:09:28 -0800, "* * Chas" >
> wrote:
>
>> Does anyone here know what kind of thermal paste AMD uses on the pad on
>>their latest heatsink/fans in the retail boxed CPUs?
>>
>>I picked up a retail boxed Athlon 64 3000+ CPU with a Venice core.
>>
>>The paste on the pad is silver and looks like it's either silver or
>>aluminum.
>>
>>If it's already silver then I'll probably skip using Arctic Silver
>>thermal paste.
>>
>>Chas.
>>
> Not sure but fwiw I have a newcastle 3200+ and replaced the pad with
> Artic Silver 3 and also tried the Artic Cremque?(spelling?) stuff, end
> result... no difference at all in temps, the stock AMD64 pads work great
> IMO.
> Ed

Did you give them their 200 hours breakin?


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J. Eric Durbin
February 14th 06, 04:55 AM
On Mon, 13 Feb 2006 19:21:30 -0800, "Ed Light" >
wrote:

>
>"Ed" > wrote in message
...
>> On Mon, 13 Feb 2006 18:09:28 -0800, "* * Chas" >
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Does anyone here know what kind of thermal paste AMD uses on the pad on
>>>their latest heatsink/fans in the retail boxed CPUs?
>>>
>>>I picked up a retail boxed Athlon 64 3000+ CPU with a Venice core.
>>>
>>>The paste on the pad is silver and looks like it's either silver or
>>>aluminum.
>>>
>>>If it's already silver then I'll probably skip using Arctic Silver
>>>thermal paste.
>>>
>>>Chas.
>>>
>> Not sure but fwiw I have a newcastle 3200+ and replaced the pad with
>> Artic Silver 3 and also tried the Artic Cremque?(spelling?) stuff, end
>> result... no difference at all in temps, the stock AMD64 pads work great
>> IMO.
>> Ed
>
>Did you give them their 200 hours breakin?

Just for comparison, I have two Athlon 64 3000+s on two different
boards:

1. MSI K8N Neo 2 Platinum using the AMD thermal pad

2. Asrock Dual SATAII 939 using Arctic Silver

The MSI consistently runs about 6-7C hotter under low load than the
Asrock. Both have had much more than the 200 hours break in. The
difference is less under high load, perhaps 2-3C.

The MSI case has two 80mm rear fans and one 80mm side fan -- it's a
Monarch branded server case, I believe from Thermaltake, with an
Enermax Whisper 420W PSU with one fan. The Asrock is in an Antec Super
Lanboy case with 120mm fans front and back with an Antec NeoPower 480
modular PSU, also with one fan.

For what it's worth...

BC
February 14th 06, 07:19 AM
* * Chas wrote:
> Does anyone here know what kind of thermal paste AMD uses on the pad on
> their latest heatsink/fans in the retail boxed CPUs?
>
> I picked up a retail boxed Athlon 64 3000+ CPU with a Venice core.
>
> The paste on the pad is silver and looks like it's either silver or
> aluminum.
>
> If it's already silver then I'll probably skip using Arctic Silver
> thermal paste.

Maximum PC, January 2006 issue, Page 70: "Thermal Paste Debate":

The conclusion: "It doesn't matter what kind of thermal compund you
use, as long as you use something".

Search of their web site does not pull up article.

Summary table: Idle Load (degrees C)

Arctic Silver 5 36 54

Arctic Ceramique 35 53 (best)

OCZ SIlver 8 36 53 (tie high load)

Frozen CPU Copper 37 58

Generic crap 40 54
from Radio Shack

FX-55 CPU, A8N-SLi mobo, Gigabyte Neon Coller heatsink/fan; recorded
with Asus A.I utility; idle measured after 30 minutes zero load; "load"
measured after running CPU burn in for one hour.

(No mention of 200 hour "curing" time....)

In my AMD 3000, I just used the stock heatsink/thermal pad....used to
scrape/clean/buff, etc, and use Artic Silver, but, always seemed the
temps I got were pretty average, and, I do not overclock...

HTH,

BC

Wes Newell
February 14th 06, 10:20 AM
On Mon, 13 Feb 2006 18:09:28 -0800, * * Chas wrote:

> Does anyone here know what kind of thermal paste AMD uses on the pad on
> their latest heatsink/fans in the retail boxed CPUs?
>
> I picked up a retail boxed Athlon 64 3000+ CPU with a Venice core.
>
> The paste on the pad is silver and looks like it's either silver or
> aluminum.
>
> If it's already silver then I'll probably skip using Arctic Silver
> thermal paste.
>
Save yourself time and money and just use what you have. I got so tired
of all the BS you see about thermal compounds I removed mine and
replaced it with 30 year old wheel bearing grease last Sept.1. Current
temps;

CPU Temp: +35C
M/B Temp: +34C

Reason the MB temp is so high is I've got 4 HDTV tuner cards in this box.
I highly recommend wheel bearing grease for it's ability to not dry out
over the years. Wonder how well AS left open in the garage for 30 years
would work.:-) To be honest I don't know how long ago the plastic tub the
grease was in deteriorated and cracked open. Maybe only 10-20 years ago.


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Ed Light
February 14th 06, 10:02 PM
"J. Eric Durbin" > wrote
> The MSI case has two 80mm rear fans and one 80mm side fan -- it's a

Just for fun, you could try closing up the side fan hole and see if it
improves. Those can disturb the airflow from front to back.


--
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Ed Light
February 14th 06, 10:05 PM
"BC" > wrote
>
> Maximum PC, January 2006 issue, Page 70: "Thermal Paste Debate":
>
> The conclusion: "It doesn't matter what kind of thermal compund you use,
> as long as you use something".

Possibly they didn't allow the 200 hrs. break-in time.

There are many reviews listed on the Arctic Silver site where Ceramique beat
Silver and Alumina by 1-2C, and in one review it beat Thermaltake generic by
7C, though that _was_ unusual.

I friend used Alumina and the temps dropped several degrees over time from
when he first fired it up.

Ceramique is only $4.
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* * Chas
February 14th 06, 10:23 PM
"Wes Newell" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Mon, 13 Feb 2006 18:09:28 -0800, * * Chas wrote:
<skip>
> Save yourself time and money and just use what you have. I got so
tired
> of all the BS you see about thermal compounds I removed mine and
> replaced it with 30 year old wheel bearing grease last Sept.1. Current
> temps;
>
> CPU Temp: +35C
> M/B Temp: +34C
>
> Reason the MB temp is so high is I've got 4 HDTV tuner cards in this
box.
> I highly recommend wheel bearing grease for it's ability to not dry
out
> over the years. Wonder how well AS left open in the garage for 30
years
> would work.:-) To be honest I don't know how long ago the plastic tub
the
> grease was in deteriorated and cracked open. Maybe only 10-20 years
ago.
>

Maybe you're on to something!

Many types of grease have metallic based high pressure lubricating
compounds. White greases usually have lithium compounds which make them
water resistant. Other HP additives use Sulfur, Chlorine or Phosphorus
compounds.

We could get some of the little plastic condiment cups that they use in
fast food restaurants and repackage the WB Grease. We could sell the
stuff for $6-$7 a cup! ;-)

Chas.

John Lewis
February 15th 06, 04:24 AM
On Tue, 14 Feb 2006 09:20:51 GMT, Wes Newell
> wrote:

>On Mon, 13 Feb 2006 18:09:28 -0800, * * Chas wrote:
>
>> Does anyone here know what kind of thermal paste AMD uses on the pad on
>> their latest heatsink/fans in the retail boxed CPUs?
>>
>> I picked up a retail boxed Athlon 64 3000+ CPU with a Venice core.
>>
>> The paste on the pad is silver and looks like it's either silver or
>> aluminum.
>>
>> If it's already silver then I'll probably skip using Arctic Silver
>> thermal paste.
>>
>Save yourself time and money and just use what you have. I got so tired
>of all the BS you see about thermal compounds I removed mine and
>replaced it with 30 year old wheel bearing grease last Sept.1. Current
>temps;
>
>CPU Temp: +35C
>M/B Temp: +34C
>
>Reason the MB temp is so high is I've got 4 HDTV tuner cards in this box.
>I highly recommend wheel bearing grease for it's ability to not dry out
>over the years. Wonder how well AS left open in the garage for 30 years
>would work.:-) To be honest I don't know how long ago the plastic tub the
>grease was in deteriorated and cracked open. Maybe only 10-20 years ago.
>

BEWARE. Grease not specifically intended for use with electronics
will have unknown electrical conductivity/capacitance, let alone
poorly-spec'd thermal conductivity. Be very careful not to smear it
anywhere near any electrical contacts or circuitry -- and double-check
that it does not ooze out and flow to undesired locations at
high-temperatures. Remember that in a wheel-bearing, the grease
is designed to flow sufficiently to lubricate all bearing surfaces
continuously.

John Lewis

Harkhof
February 15th 06, 05:31 AM
"John Lewis" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 14 Feb 2006 09:20:51 GMT, Wes Newell
> > wrote:
>
>>On Mon, 13 Feb 2006 18:09:28 -0800, * * Chas wrote:
>>
>>> Does anyone here know what kind of thermal paste AMD uses on the pad on
>>> their latest heatsink/fans in the retail boxed CPUs?
>>>
>>> I picked up a retail boxed Athlon 64 3000+ CPU with a Venice core.
>>>
>>> The paste on the pad is silver and looks like it's either silver or
>>> aluminum.
>>>
>>> If it's already silver then I'll probably skip using Arctic Silver
>>> thermal paste.
>>>
>>Save yourself time and money and just use what you have. I got so tired
>>of all the BS you see about thermal compounds I removed mine and
>>replaced it with 30 year old wheel bearing grease last Sept.1. Current
>>temps;
>>
>>CPU Temp: +35C
>>M/B Temp: +34C
>>
>>Reason the MB temp is so high is I've got 4 HDTV tuner cards in this box.
>>I highly recommend wheel bearing grease for it's ability to not dry out
>>over the years. Wonder how well AS left open in the garage for 30 years
>>would work.:-) To be honest I don't know how long ago the plastic tub the
>>grease was in deteriorated and cracked open. Maybe only 10-20 years ago.
>>
>
> BEWARE. Grease not specifically intended for use with electronics
> will have unknown electrical conductivity/capacitance, let alone
> poorly-spec'd thermal conductivity. Be very careful not to smear it
> anywhere near any electrical contacts or circuitry -- and double-check
> that it does not ooze out and flow to undesired locations at
> high-temperatures. Remember that in a wheel-bearing, the grease
> is designed to flow sufficiently to lubricate all bearing surfaces
> continuously.

Not to mention the fact that grese, when heated, gets thin and tends to seep
(or ooze...) out unless somehow contained.

Harkhof
February 15th 06, 05:38 AM
"Harkhof" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "John Lewis" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Tue, 14 Feb 2006 09:20:51 GMT, Wes Newell
>> > wrote:
>>
>>>On Mon, 13 Feb 2006 18:09:28 -0800, * * Chas wrote:
>>>
>>>> Does anyone here know what kind of thermal paste AMD uses on the pad
>>>> on
>>>> their latest heatsink/fans in the retail boxed CPUs?
>>>>
>>>> I picked up a retail boxed Athlon 64 3000+ CPU with a Venice core.
>>>>
>>>> The paste on the pad is silver and looks like it's either silver or
>>>> aluminum.
>>>>
>>>> If it's already silver then I'll probably skip using Arctic Silver
>>>> thermal paste.
>>>>
>>>Save yourself time and money and just use what you have. I got so tired
>>>of all the BS you see about thermal compounds I removed mine and
>>>replaced it with 30 year old wheel bearing grease last Sept.1. Current
>>>temps;
>>>
>>>CPU Temp: +35C
>>>M/B Temp: +34C
>>>
>>>Reason the MB temp is so high is I've got 4 HDTV tuner cards in this box.
>>>I highly recommend wheel bearing grease for it's ability to not dry out
>>>over the years. Wonder how well AS left open in the garage for 30 years
>>>would work.:-) To be honest I don't know how long ago the plastic tub the
>>>grease was in deteriorated and cracked open. Maybe only 10-20 years ago.
>>>
>>
>> BEWARE. Grease not specifically intended for use with electronics
>> will have unknown electrical conductivity/capacitance, let alone
>> poorly-spec'd thermal conductivity. Be very careful not to smear it
>> anywhere near any electrical contacts or circuitry -- and double-check
>> that it does not ooze out and flow to undesired locations at
>> high-temperatures. Remember that in a wheel-bearing, the grease
>> is designed to flow sufficiently to lubricate all bearing surfaces
>> continuously.
>
> Not to mention the fact that grese, when heated, gets thin and tends to
> seep (or ooze...) out unless somehow contained.

Oops...I see you *did* mention that...

Wes Newell
February 15th 06, 08:01 AM
On Wed, 15 Feb 2006 03:24:25 +0000, John Lewis wrote:

> On Tue, 14 Feb 2006 09:20:51 GMT, Wes Newell
> > wrote:
>
>>On Mon, 13 Feb 2006 18:09:28 -0800, * * Chas wrote:
>>
>>> Does anyone here know what kind of thermal paste AMD uses on the pad on
>>> their latest heatsink/fans in the retail boxed CPUs?
>>>
>>> I picked up a retail boxed Athlon 64 3000+ CPU with a Venice core.
>>>
>>> The paste on the pad is silver and looks like it's either silver or
>>> aluminum.
>>>
>>> If it's already silver then I'll probably skip using Arctic Silver
>>> thermal paste.
>>>
>>Save yourself time and money and just use what you have. I got so tired
>>of all the BS you see about thermal compounds I removed mine and
>>replaced it with 30 year old wheel bearing grease last Sept.1. Current
>>temps;
>>
>>CPU Temp: +35C
>>M/B Temp: +34C
>>
>>Reason the MB temp is so high is I've got 4 HDTV tuner cards in this box.
>>I highly recommend wheel bearing grease for it's ability to not dry out
>>over the years. Wonder how well AS left open in the garage for 30 years
>>would work.:-) To be honest I don't know how long ago the plastic tub the
>>grease was in deteriorated and cracked open. Maybe only 10-20 years ago.
>>
>
> BEWARE. Grease not specifically intended for use with electronics
> will have unknown electrical conductivity/capacitance, let alone
> poorly-spec'd thermal conductivity. Be very careful not to smear it
> anywhere near any electrical contacts or circuitry -- and double-check
> that it does not ooze out and flow to undesired locations at
> high-temperatures. Remember that in a wheel-bearing, the grease
> is designed to flow sufficiently to lubricate all bearing surfaces
> continuously.
>
> John Lewis

I think nearly 6 months of 24/7 operation can just about do away with
this BS fud. Not to mention that wheel bearing grease is made to withstand
10 times the tempature your cpu will ever get to. And If you'd done your
homework, you'd know that it won't run at the low temps of the cpu.

So beware, a fool and his money is soon parted by fud talking people like
this.

--
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John Lewis
February 17th 06, 06:26 AM
On Wed, 15 Feb 2006 07:01:43 GMT, Wes Newell
> wrote:


>
>I think nearly 6 months of 24/7 operation can just about do away with
>this BS fud. Not to mention that wheel bearing grease is made to withstand
>10 times the tempature your cpu will ever get to. And If you'd done your
>homework, you'd know that it won't run at the low temps of the cpu.
>
>So beware, a fool and his money is soon parted by fud talking people like
>this.
>

Arrogant idiot - wrong implied-assumption....

FYI, I don't subscribe to Arctic Silver either, no more than I believe
in the vitues of Monster Cable over copper cable of the same gauge,
or any other techno gimmick supplied to the technically illiterate.

Thermal grease specifically for electronic heat-transfer or the pads
supplied on the boxed-CPU heatsinks are just fine. Nice to know that
you have measured the thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity
and specific capacitance of all available wheel-bearing grease.
Like to tabulate the results ?

John Lewis

>--
>Want the ultimate in free OTA SD/HDTV Recorder? http://mythtv.org
>http://mysettopbox.tv/knoppmyth.html Usenet alt.video.ptv.mythtv
>My server http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/cpu.php
>

dark_ryan
February 20th 06, 06:40 PM
"* * Chas" > wrote in message
...
> Does anyone here know what kind of thermal paste AMD uses on the pad on
> their latest heatsink/fans in the retail boxed CPUs?
>
> I picked up a retail boxed Athlon 64 3000+ CPU with a Venice core.
>
> The paste on the pad is silver and looks like it's either silver or
> aluminum.
>
> If it's already silver then I'll probably skip using Arctic Silver
> thermal paste.
>
> Chas.
>
>
As I recall reading when I built my AMD Athlon 64 3500+ and 3700+ system, if
you change the heatsink your warrenty will be voided. Though there is no
need to change the thermal paste.

* * Chas
February 20th 06, 06:44 PM
"dark_ryan" > wrote in message
...
>
> "* * Chas" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Does anyone here know what kind of thermal paste AMD uses on the pad
on
> > their latest heatsink/fans in the retail boxed CPUs?
> >
> > I picked up a retail boxed Athlon 64 3000+ CPU with a Venice core.
> >
> > The paste on the pad is silver and looks like it's either silver or
> > aluminum.
> >
> > If it's already silver then I'll probably skip using Arctic Silver
> > thermal paste.
> >
> > Chas.
> >
> >
> As I recall reading when I built my AMD Athlon 64 3500+ and 3700+
system, if
> you change the heatsink your warrenty will be voided. Though there is
no
> need to change the thermal paste.
>
>
Interesting point!

Chas.

Harkhof
February 25th 06, 03:44 AM
"Wes Newell" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Tue, 14 Feb 2006 22:31:40 -0600, Harkhof wrote:
>
>> Not to mention the fact that grese, when heated, gets thin and tends to
>> seep
>> (or ooze...) out unless somehow contained.
>

> And yet another fudster.


As you can see from my late response to this post, my time is quite limited.
As such, I have no time or interest for "blow torch & grease" tests. I
would, however, be interested in your definition of "fudster". Is this some
sort of intellectual term of which I am unaware? Or is it a self invented
noun to further extend the usefulness of the "jargon" term "fud"? If you
really want to insult someone, you should try using an actual word, or at
the very least make the attempt to explain terms you make up.

> Now go take a bit of WB grrease and heat it to
> 100C and see how much it runs. Better yet, see what it does under a direct
> flame. Then come back with the results. I've already done this. Do the
> same with the HS compound of your choice and let's see which one is still
> usable.:-)

Where does one begin when someone makes such an arrogant, obtuse statement?
Some would think such arrogance over such a trivial matter would imply that
the utterer of such a statement must be a child, or at the very least, one
who's emotional maturation has been arrested at some point in life. I myself
extend you the benefit of the doubt and assume that you really didn't intend
to sound so childishly arrogant. Perhaps you have unresolved issues?

Now, to address your assertions: Who cares? I myself have always used the
stock heat sink and thermal compoud that came with the chip. Would I ever
try out your "grease hypothosis"? Doubtful. Why? Again, I don't care. I
simply jumped in with the reality that grease, when heated, tends to liquify
and run. You state that a cpu doesn't produce adequate temperatures to
produce such results. Though I would hardly, as you suggest, pull my cpu out
at smear it with grease just because you command it (or for any other
reason, really), I have to say that I also would not take you at your word
simply because, by virtue of your response and arrogance, you seem to be an
as_hole.

Hark

* * Chas
February 25th 06, 04:40 AM
"Harkhof" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Wes Newell" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > On Tue, 14 Feb 2006 22:31:40 -0600, Harkhof wrote:
<snip>

> I simply jumped in with the reality that grease, when heated, tends to
liquify
> and run. You state that a cpu doesn't produce adequate temperatures to
> produce such results.
>
> Hark

After 10 to 20 years of sitting in a broken plastic 1 lb. tub, most if
not all of the volatile components in the wheel bearing grease have
probably evaporated. Add to that the possible heat transfer qualities of
the extreme pressure additives and the stuff might work as a thermal
paste without liquefying.

But given the dozens of different formulations for wheel bearing grease,
I personally am not willing to experiment with the stuff.

The purpose of thermal transferring materials is to fill the gaps
between a semiconductor and a heat sink. The white silicone based grease
has been used in commercial applications such as lighting, voltage
switches and regulators for over 40 years.

Silver has very high thermal conductivity. I put a faster CPU and new
fan in one of my ThinkPads. I initially used Radio Shack white goop. It
was running a little hot as measured with 2 different utilities. I
replaced the white silicone compound with Arctic Silver and noticed
about a 10% reduction in CPU heat.

Chas.

Wes Newell
February 25th 06, 06:06 AM
On Fri, 24 Feb 2006 20:44:18 -0600, Harkhof wrote:

> As you can see from my late response to this post, my time is quite limited.
> As such, I have no time or interest for "blow torch & grease" tests. I
> would, however, be interested in your definition of "fudster". Is this some
> sort of intellectual term of which I am unaware? Or is it a self invented
> noun to further extend the usefulness of the "jargon" term "fud"? If you
> really want to insult someone, you should try using an actual word, or at
> the very least make the attempt to explain terms you make up.
>

Ok, then go get screwed. How's that. Now since you don't seem to have
enough brains to look it up, here's a link.

http://homepage.mac.com/bhoglund/forumFudsters.html

>> Now go take a bit of WB grrease and heat it to 100C and see how much it
>> runs. Better yet, see what it does under a direct flame. Then come back
>> with the results. I've already done this. Do the same with the HS
>> compound of your choice and let's see which one is still usable.:-)
>
> Where does one begin when someone makes such an arrogant, obtuse
> statement?

Well, If I wree really interested, I'd perform the experiment to see what
the out come was. But a fudstrer like you will do nothing and just come
back with some BS remark like you have. Don't like being called a fudster?
Fine I'll end with bye dickhead.


> Some would think such arrogance over such a trivial matter
> would imply that the utterer of such a statement must be a child, or at
> the very least, one who's emotional maturation has been arrested at some
> point in life. I myself extend you the benefit of the doubt and assume
> that you really didn't intend to sound so childishly arrogant. Perhaps
> you have unresolved issues?
>
You see this is why you are a fudster. Not being able or willing to
disprove or prove anything, you immediately attack something about the
other person. And even then without knowing anything about them.

> Now, to address your assertions: Who cares?

Well, you obviously must care or you wouldn't have replied.

> I myself have always used the stock heat sink and thermal compoud that
> came with the chip. Would I ever try out your "grease hypothosis"?

Yet you seem so willing to condem it without trying it. Now what do that
say about you.

> Doubtful. Why? Again, I don't care. I simply jumped in with the reality
> that grease, when heated, tends to liquify and run. You state that a cpu
> doesn't produce adequate temperatures to produce such results. Though I
> would hardly, as you suggest, pull my cpu out at smear it with grease
> just because you command it (or for any other reason, really), I have to
> say that I also would not take you at your word simply because, by
> virtue of your response and arrogance, you seem to be an as_hole.
>
I didn't ask you to test it on your cpu. I said put it under a flame and
see how much it runs. hell, just open up a tub of that been in a hot
garage. the cpu won't get much hotter than that. It's not oil.

So here's where we stand. I made a claim backed up by test and usage (of
almost 6 months now) and you say it crap, without conducting any test of
your own. That's what a fudster does. In this case you just hampen to be a
whimpering dickhead too. if if those aren't instults enough, I've got
plenty more although I'd prefer not to waste my time on you.

--
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http://mysettopbox.tv/knoppmyth.html Usenet alt.video.ptv.mythtv
My server http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/cpu.php

Harkhof
February 25th 06, 10:00 AM
"Wes Newell" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Fri, 24 Feb 2006 20:44:18 -0600, Harkhof wrote:
>
>> As you can see from my late response to this post, my time is quite
>> limited.
>> As such, I have no time or interest for "blow torch & grease" tests. I
>> would, however, be interested in your definition of "fudster". Is this
>> some
>> sort of intellectual term of which I am unaware? Or is it a self invented
>> noun to further extend the usefulness of the "jargon" term "fud"? If you
>> really want to insult someone, you should try using an actual word, or at
>> the very least make the attempt to explain terms you make up.
>>
>
> Ok, then go get screwed.

heh!

> How's that. Now since you don't seem to have
> enough brains to look it up, here's a link.
>
> http://homepage.mac.com/bhoglund/forumFudsters.html

So, then, it is indeed an extension of the jargon term FUD. Thanks for the
link. I now know the location of a totally useless site. You spend much time
there?


>>> Now go take a bit of WB grrease and heat it to 100C and see how much it
>>> runs. Better yet, see what it does under a direct flame. Then come back
>>> with the results. I've already done this. Do the same with the HS
>>> compound of your choice and let's see which one is still usable.:-)
>>
>> Where does one begin when someone makes such an arrogant, obtuse
>> statement?
>
> Well, If I wree really interested,

Now you're getting it...


> I'd perform the experiment to see what
> the out come was. But a fudstrer like you will do nothing and just come
> back with some BS remark like you have. Don't like being called a fudster?

Of course not. Thus, my objections. Must you be obtuse?

> Fine I'll end with bye dickhead.

Yet you didn't end. There's a real credibility boost.

>
>> Some would think such arrogance over such a trivial matter
>> would imply that the utterer of such a statement must be a child, or at
>> the very least, one who's emotional maturation has been arrested at some
>> point in life. I myself extend you the benefit of the doubt and assume
>> that you really didn't intend to sound so childishly arrogant. Perhaps
>> you have unresolved issues?
>>
> You see this is why you are a fudster. Not being able or willing to
> disprove or prove anything, you immediately attack something about the
> other person. And even then without knowing anything about them.

And herein lies your error. Try re-reading the thread, genius, or finish
this paragraph, reading carefully, since you've already demonstrated a
notable lack of discernment. My first post to this thread merely regarded
my opinion regarding the properties of grease. If you believe that to be an
attack then, well, perhaps a little therapy is in order.

Your response, however, was to call me a liar. That's just plain rude. I
stated as much in my follow up post.

>> Now, to address your assertions: Who cares?
>
> Well, you obviously must care or you wouldn't have replied.

Another flawed conclusion. My objections are not directed at your incidental
"theory", but rather your ill manners.

>> I myself have always used the stock heat sink and thermal compoud that
>> came with the chip. Would I ever try out your "grease hypothosis"?
>
> Yet you seem so willing to condem it without trying it. Now what do that
> say about you.

uh, I don't care?


>> Doubtful. Why? Again, I don't care. I simply jumped in with the reality
>> that grease, when heated, tends to liquify and run. You state that a cpu
>> doesn't produce adequate temperatures to produce such results. Though I
>> would hardly, as you suggest, pull my cpu out at smear it with grease
>> just because you command it (or for any other reason, really), I have to
>> say that I also would not take you at your word simply because, by
>> virtue of your response and arrogance, you seem to be an as_hole.
>>
> I didn't ask you to test it on your cpu. I said put it under a flame and
> see how much it runs. hell, just open up a tub of that been in a hot
> garage. the cpu won't get much hotter than that. It's not oil.

Why? Of what possible importance could that be to me? I can safely say that
I will never apply bearing grease to my cpu. You of course, are free to do
as you wish. And since my endorsement seems to be of some importance to you,
perhaps it will help to know that, while I don't endorse it, nor do I
condemn it. Will that do?

> So here's where we stand. I made a claim backed up by test and usage (of
> almost 6 months now) and you say it crap,

Uh, nope. Didn't say that. Personally, I don't care if it's crap or caviar.
Never said I did.

> without conducting any test of
> your own. That's what a fudster does. In this case you just hampen to be a
> whimpering dickhead too.

Really, now. You simply *must* do something about your issues. They must
torment you.

> if if those aren't instults enough, I've got
> plenty more

That would correspond with the characteristics you've already demonstrated.
You must be very proud...

> although I'd prefer not to waste my time on you.

And yet you have.

nos1eep
February 25th 06, 06:12 PM
It is further alleged that on or about Sat, 25 Feb 2006 05:06:36 GMT,
in alt.comp.hardware.amd.x86-64, the queezy keyboard of Wes Newell
> spewed the following:

|On Fri, 24 Feb 2006 20:44:18 -0600, Harkhof wrote:
|
|> As you can see from my late response to this post, my time is quite limited.
|> As such, I have no time or interest for "blow torch & grease" tests. I
|> would, however, be interested in your definition of "fudster". Is this some
|> sort of intellectual term of which I am unaware? Or is it a self invented
|> noun to further extend the usefulness of the "jargon" term "fud"? If you
|> really want to insult someone, you should try using an actual word, or at
|> the very least make the attempt to explain terms you make up.
|>
|
|Ok, then go get screwed. How's that. Now since you don't seem to have
|enough brains to look it up, here's a link.
|
|http://homepage.mac.com/bhoglund/forumFudsters.html

Jeez, Wes, your link sucks almost as much as your advice.
*plonk*
--

-nos1eep

Baldy
July 19th 06, 05:03 PM
On Wed, 15 Feb 2006 07:05:53 GMT, Wes Newell
> wrote:

>On Tue, 14 Feb 2006 22:31:40 -0600, Harkhof wrote:
>
>> Not to mention the fact that grese, when heated, gets thin and tends to seep
>> (or ooze...) out unless somehow contained.
>
>And yet another fudster. Now go take a bit of WB grrease and heat it to
>100C and see how much it runs. Better yet, see what it does under a direct
>flame. Then come back with the results. I've already done this. Do the
>same with the HS compound of your choice and let's see which one is still
>usable.:-)

Apply the 100C to any CPU and see how it runs.